96

In the following test code I would like to have both mytype and the doPrivate method private, so that only members of mytype can access it, but not other types\functions in the scope of the mypackage package.

Can I do this in golang?

package mypackage

type mytype struct {
    size          string
    hash          uint32
}

func (r *mytype) doPrivate() string {
    return r.size
}

func (r *mytype) Do() string {
    return doPrivate("dsdsd")
}

Fields size and hash as well as the doPrivate method should be encapsulated and no other type should have access to them.

0

6 Answers 6

121

In Go, an identifier that starts with a capital letter is exported from the package, and can be accessed by anyone outside the package that declares it.

If an identifier starts with a lower case letter, it can only be accessed from within the package.

If you need members in a type to only be accessed by members of that type, you then need to place that type and its member functions in a separate package, as the only type in that package.

91

That's not how "privacy" works in Go: the granularity of privacy is the package.

If you really want only the members of mytype to access some fields, then you must isolate the struct and the functions in their own package.

But that's not the usual practice. Whether Go is OOP or not is debatable but clearly the practice isn't to encapsulate the code by a struct like you seem to want to do. Usually a package is small enough to be coherent: if you don't want to access fields from within the package, don't access them.

10
  • 34
    I'd suggest you to read the code of some major standard packages of Go. Yes, whole packages. You'll be amazed at the clarity and simplicity this choice allows. Don't try to emulate another language in Go. Mar 3, 2014 at 14:01
  • 6
    good point, I don't like nor understand why people emulate "classes" or "classical inheritance" in JavaScript. In this point of time, it seems wired.
    – andrew.fox
    Mar 3, 2014 at 14:04
  • 24
    one remark though, the sentence "if you don't want to access fields from within the package, don't access them" - you could say that about encapsulation in general, but that doesn't solve any problems. It seems that Golang moves abstraction from class-scope to a package-scope. In my opinion it may make programs difficult to maintain. Just like modules in JavaScript (except for private fields).
    – andrew.fox
    Mar 3, 2014 at 14:54
  • 7
    The implicit reasoning behind is that the package is simple and small enough so that there's no coherency problem and no need of inner privacy enforcing. If you feel it makes it harder to maintain, maybe your package is too big. Of course, we're here rather in the domain of opinions and different programmer practices and experiences. Mar 3, 2014 at 14:58
  • 2
    Such a thing should be part of the language. Software Design and developers who will join the team later would be thankful, they do not have to handle with a Lava Flow, Duplicated, Giant Ball of Mud Monolith Application
    – Pwnstar
    Mar 3, 2018 at 16:42
44

You can create an interface with the method you wish to expose and only access the object when wrapped into that interface.

package main

type mytype struct {
    size string
    hash uint32
}

// interface for exposed methods
type myinterface interface {
    do() string
}

// constructor (optional)
func newMytype(size string, hash uint32) myinterface {
    return &mytype{size, hash}
}

func (r *mytype) doPrivate() string {
    return r.size
}

func (r *mytype) do() string {
    return r.doPrivate()
}

func main() {
    // with constructor
    t := newMytype("100", 100)
    t.do()
    // t.doPrivate() // t.doPrivate undefined (type myinterface has no field or method doPrivate)

    // without constructor
    t2:= myinterface(&mytype{"100", 100})
    t2.do()
    // t.doPrivate() // t.doPrivate undefined (type myinterface has no field or method doPrivate)doPrivate)
}

https://play.golang.org/p/awjIIj8Kwms

3
  • 7
    Out of all the answers this one combines the best of all worlds and should be higher up. Proper programming indeed involves interfaces so all the more reason to employ them. Nicely done!
    – XDS
    Mar 17, 2021 at 4:11
  • 1
    This is exactly what I do in my code.
    – wintermute
    Jun 22, 2022 at 17:37
  • 1
    This is definitely the best answer. Apr 19, 2023 at 16:33
14

You cannot do this in Go. Visibility is on a per package level only. But you may split your package into two.

7

In one module there can be any number of packages.

Public/Private works only across one package.
All public fields, methods and functions starts with uppercase char.
All private fields, methods and functions starts with lowercase char.

To add package to your module or program just create a lowercase folder and add package name to all files inside. Here is the example.

./main.go
./foo/foo.go
./foo/MyStruct.go

file ./foo/foo.go:

package foo

import "fmt"

func SomePublicFuncInFoo() {
    somePrivateFuncInFoo()
}

func somePrivateFuncInFoo() {
    fmt.Println("somePrivateFuncInFoo call")
}

file ./foo/MyStruct.go:

package foo

import "fmt"

type MyStruct struct {
    MyPublicField  string // starts with uppercase char
    myPrivateField string // starts with lowercase char
}

func NewMyStruct(publicField string, privateField string) *MyStruct {
    return &MyStruct{
        MyPublicField:  publicField,  
        myPrivateField: privateField, 
    }
}

func (self *MyStruct) SomePublicMethod() {
    self.privateMethod()
}

func (self *MyStruct) privateMethod() {
    fmt.Println("MyStruct", self.MyPublicField, self.myPrivateField)
}

file ./main.go:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "{your-module-name}/foo" // this line should be added by your IDE
)

func main() {

    foo.SomePublicFuncInFoo()

    myStruct := foo.NewMyStruct("string1", "string2")
    fmt.Println("myStruct.MyPublicField=", myStruct.MyPublicField)

    myStruct.SomePublicMethod()
}
1

You can have private variables and functions in Go, but the trick is that you simply don't define them in the struct. Bind them to the call stack of a closure, and simply don't return them.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

type mytype struct {
    Do func() string
}

func MyType(size string, hash uint32) mytype {
    doPrivate := func() string {
        return size
    }
    return mytype{
        Do: func() string {
            return doPrivate()
        },
    }
}

func main() {
    instance := MyType("100", 100)
    fmt.Println(instance.Do())
}

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