9

I'm looking for a correct way to measure openCV FPS. I've found several ways to do it. but none of them looks right for me.

The first one I've tested, uses time_t start and time_t end. I think that one is wrong once it returns me a dumped function as fps x time plot (I really can't imagine how a fps plot could be a dumped function).

Here the image of this plot.

FPS PLOT

The second I've tested uses t = (double)cvGetTickCount() to measure fps. This way is wrong once it returns 120 fps as result, but, for a 30 seconds length video captured with 120 fps shouldn't take more than 1 minute to be processed. so this is a wrong way to measure FPS.

Someone knows another way to measure FPS in openCV?

Ps. I'm trying to find circles in each frame of the video. The video frame size is 320x240 pixels.

Update 2 The code that I'm trying to measure FPS.

for(;;)
    {

        clock_t start=CLOCK();

        Mat frame, finalFrame;
        capture >> frame; 

        finalFrame = frame;

        cvtColor(frame, frame, CV_BGR2GRAY);

        GaussianBlur(frame, frame, Size(7,7), 1.5, 1.5);
        threshold(frame, frame, 20, 255, CV_THRESH_BINARY);

        dilate(frame, frame, Mat(), Point(-1, -1), 2, 1, 1);
        erode(frame, frame, Mat(), Point(-1, -1), 2, 1, 1);

        Canny(frame, frame, 20, 20*2, 3 );

        vector<Vec3f> circles;

        findContours(frame,_contours,_storage,CV_RETR_CCOMP,CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE );

        vector<vector<Point> > contours_poly( _contours.size() );
        vector<Rect> boundRect( _contours.size() );
        vector<Point2f>center( _contours.size() );
        vector<float>radius( _contours.size() );


        int temp = 0;

        for( int i = 0; i < _contours.size(); i++ )
        { 
            if( _contours[i].size() > 100 )
            {
               approxPolyDP( Mat(_contours[i]), contours_poly[i], 3, true );
               boundRect[i] = boundingRect( Mat(_contours[i]) );
               minEnclosingCircle( (Mat)_contours[i], center[i], radius[i] );
               temp = i;
               break;
            }
        }



        double dur = CLOCK()-start;
            printf("avg time per frame %f ms. fps %f. frameno = %d\n",avgdur(dur),avgfps(),frameno++ );

        frameCounter++;

        if(frameCounter == 3600)
        break;

        if(waitKey(1000/120) >= 0) break;
    }

Update

Program execution using the Zaw Lin method! enter image description here

  • 1
    do you want to measure the fps of the video or the current runtime fps(to know how fast your algorithm can run)? – Zaw Lin Mar 3 '14 at 14:13
  • I'm looking for a way to measure runtime fps! – MSO Mar 3 '14 at 14:16
  • getTickCount() returns a number of ticks, not a duration in seconds. You have to use getTickFrequency() to convert ticks into seconds. See docs.opencv.org/modules/core/doc/…. – BConic Mar 3 '14 at 14:22
9

I have posted a way to do that @ Getting current FPS of OpenCV. It is necessary to do a bit of averaging otherwise the fps will be too jumpy.

edit

I have put a Sleep inside process() and it gives correct fps and duration(+/- 1ms).

#include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
#include "opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp"
#include <opencv/cv.h>
#include <sys/timeb.h>
using namespace cv;

#if defined(_MSC_VER) || defined(WIN32)  || defined(_WIN32) || defined(__WIN32__) \
    || defined(WIN64)    || defined(_WIN64) || defined(__WIN64__) 

#include <windows.h>
bool _qpcInited=false;
double PCFreq = 0.0;
__int64 CounterStart = 0;
void InitCounter()
{
    LARGE_INTEGER li;
    if(!QueryPerformanceFrequency(&li))
    {
        std::cout << "QueryPerformanceFrequency failed!\n";
    }
    PCFreq = double(li.QuadPart)/1000.0f;
    _qpcInited=true;
}
double CLOCK()
{
    if(!_qpcInited) InitCounter();
    LARGE_INTEGER li;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&li);
    return double(li.QuadPart)/PCFreq;
}

#endif

#if defined(unix)        || defined(__unix)      || defined(__unix__) \
    || defined(linux)       || defined(__linux)     || defined(__linux__) \
    || defined(sun)         || defined(__sun) \
    || defined(BSD)         || defined(__OpenBSD__) || defined(__NetBSD__) \
    || defined(__FreeBSD__) || defined __DragonFly__ \
    || defined(sgi)         || defined(__sgi) \
    || defined(__MACOSX__)  || defined(__APPLE__) \
    || defined(__CYGWIN__) 
double CLOCK()
{
    struct timespec t;
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC,  &t);
    return (t.tv_sec * 1000)+(t.tv_nsec*1e-6);
}
#endif

double _avgdur=0;
double _fpsstart=0;
double _avgfps=0;
double _fps1sec=0;

double avgdur(double newdur)
{
    _avgdur=0.98*_avgdur+0.02*newdur;
    return _avgdur;
}

double avgfps()
{
    if(CLOCK()-_fpsstart>1000)      
    {
        _fpsstart=CLOCK();
        _avgfps=0.7*_avgfps+0.3*_fps1sec;
        _fps1sec=0;
    }
    _fps1sec++;
    return _avgfps;
}

void process(Mat& frame)
{
    Sleep(3);
}
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int frameno=0;
    cv::Mat frame;
    cv::VideoCapture cap(0);
    for(;;)
    {
        //cap>>frame;
        double start=CLOCK();
        process(frame);
        double dur = CLOCK()-start;
        printf("avg time per frame %f ms. fps %f. frameno = %d\n",avgdur(dur),avgfps(),frameno++ );
        if(waitKey(1)==27)
            exit(0);
    }
    return 0;
}    
  • Zaw Lin Thanks for ur reply. I've tested ur method to measure the FPS. the problem is: the avgfps() is always increasing it's value up 220 fps and the average time for each frame keeps on 7 or 8 ms per frame ! What's wrong with it? – MSO Mar 3 '14 at 14:26
  • Is this something unexpected? May I know what's expected? – Zaw Lin Mar 3 '14 at 14:31
  • I think this is unexpected once the time to process each frame remains the same, never decreases. to achieve 220 fps the time to process each frame should be less than 7 ms, maybe 3 or 4, and that is not what's happening. I've got a pic of the program execution. I'll update the main thread with it. Please check it! – MSO Mar 3 '14 at 14:35
  • hi, I believe this behaviour occurs because clock()'s smallest sensitivity is 1ms. If each frame takes less than one ms, some rounding should occur and you will still get 1ms. When they are averaged out, the duration is higher than expected due to accumulation of rounding errors. You can test by outputting the instantaneous duration instead of average duration. You will notice a lot of 1ms(which are probably less than 1ms). But since fps is really counting in 1 second intervals, it should be more accurate. – Zaw Lin Mar 3 '14 at 14:41
  • 2
    did you call InitCounter(); before anything? – Zaw Lin Mar 3 '14 at 17:43
1

You can use OpenCV's API to get the original FPS if you are dealing with video files. The following method will not work when capturing from a live stream:

cv::VideoCapture capture("C:\\video.avi");
if (!capture.isOpened())
{
    std::cout  << "!!! Could not open input video" << std::endl;
    return;
}

std::cout << "FPS: " << capture.get(CV_CAP_PROP_FPS) << std::endl;

To get the actual FPS after the processing, you can try Zaw's method.

0

You can use opencv helper cv::getTickCount()

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#include "opencv2/core.hpp"
#include "opencv2/core/utility.hpp"
#include "opencv2/video.hpp"
#include "opencv2/highgui.hpp"

using namespace cv;


int main(int ac, char** av) {

    VideoCapture capture(0);
    Mat frame;

    for (;;) {

        int64 start = cv::getTickCount();

        capture >> frame;
        if (frame.empty())
            break;

        /* do some image processing here */

        char key = (char)waitKey(1);

        double fps = cv::getTickFrequency() / (cv::getTickCount() - start);
        std::cout << "FPS : " << fps << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
0

I would just measure the walltime and simply divide the frames by time elapsed. On linux:

/*
* compile with:
*   g++ -ggdb webcam_fps_example2.cpp -o webcam_fps_example2 `pkg-config --cflags --libs opencv`
*/

#include "opencv2/opencv.hpp"
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/time.h>


using namespace cv;
using namespace std;

double get_wall_time(){
    struct timeval time;
    if (gettimeofday(&time,NULL)){
        //  Handle error
        return 0;
    }
    return (double)time.tv_sec + (double)time.tv_usec * .000001;
}


int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    VideoCapture cap;
    // open the default camera, use something different from 0 otherwise;
    // Check VideoCapture documentation.
    if(!cap.open(0))
        return 0;

    cap.set(CV_CAP_PROP_FRAME_WIDTH,1920);
    cap.set(CV_CAP_PROP_FRAME_HEIGHT,1080);

    double wall0 = get_wall_time();
    for(int x = 0; x < 500; x++)
    {
          Mat frame;
          cap >> frame;
          if( frame.empty() ) break; // end of video stream
          //imshow("this is you, smile! :)", frame);
          if( waitKey(10) == 27 ) break; // stop capturing by pressing ESC 
    }
    double wall1 = get_wall_time();
    double fps = 500/(wall1 - wall0);
    cout << "Wall Time = " << wall1 - wall0 << endl;
    cout << "FPS = " << fps << endl;
    // the camera will be closed automatically upon exit
    // cap.close();
    return 0;
}

Wall Time = 43.9243 FPS = 11.3832

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