For a certain Hibernate entity we have a requirement to store its creation time and the last time it was updated. How would you design this?

  • What data types would you use in the database (assuming MySQL, possibly in a different timezone that the JVM)? Will the data types be timezone-aware?

  • What data types would you use in Java (Date, Calendar, long, ...)?

  • Whom would you make responsible for setting the timestamps—the database, the ORM framework (Hibernate), or the application programmer?

  • What annotations would you use for the mapping (e.g. @Temporal)?

I'm not only looking for a working solution, but for a safe and well-designed solution.

13 Answers 13

If you are using the JPA annotations, you can use @PrePersist and @PreUpdate event hooks do this:

@Entity
@Table(name = "entities")    
public class Entity {
  ...

  private Date created;
  private Date updated;

  @PrePersist
  protected void onCreate() {
    created = new Date();
  }

  @PreUpdate
  protected void onUpdate() {
    updated = new Date();
  }
}

or you can use the @EntityListener annotation on the class and place the event code in an external class.

  • 7
    Works without any problems in J2SE, as @PrePersist and @PerUpdate are JPA annotations. – Kdeveloper Dec 16 '10 at 19:52
  • 10
    Good soultion but won't work when using Hibernate Session. – Kumar Sambhav Sep 15 '13 at 14:11
  • 2
    @Kumar - In case you are using plain Hibernate session ( instead of JPA) you can try hibernate event listeners, although that's not very elegant and compact vs JPA annotations. – Shailendra Oct 9 '13 at 10:16
  • 30
    In current Hibernate with JPA one can use "@CreationTimestamp" and "@UpdateTimestamp" – Florian Loch Mar 9 '15 at 10:04
  • @FlorianLoch is there an equivalent for Date rather than Timestamp? Or would I have to create my own? – mike Mar 16 '16 at 14:33

Taking the resources in this post along with information taken left and right from different sources, I came with this elegant solution, create the following abstract class

import java.util.Date;

import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.MappedSuperclass;
import javax.persistence.PrePersist;
import javax.persistence.PreUpdate;
import javax.persistence.Temporal;
import javax.persistence.TemporalType;

@MappedSuperclass
public abstract class AbstractTimestampEntity {

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(name = "created", nullable = false)
    private Date created;

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(name = "updated", nullable = false)
    private Date updated;

    @PrePersist
    protected void onCreate() {
    updated = created = new Date();
    }

    @PreUpdate
    protected void onUpdate() {
    updated = new Date();
    }
}

and have all your entities extend it, for instance:

@Entity
@Table(name = "campaign")
public class Campaign extends AbstractTimestampEntity implements Serializable {
...
}
  • 5
    this is good until you want to add different exclusive behaviours to your entities (and you can't extend more than one base class). afaik the only way to obtain the same effect without a base class is though aspectj itd or event listeners see @kieren dixon answer – gpilotino Feb 2 '12 at 0:49
  • 3
    I would do this using a MySQL trigger so that even if the full entity is not saved or is modified by any external application or manual query, it'll still update these fields. – Webnet Jul 25 '13 at 12:09
  • 3
    can you give me any working example because I'm experiencing exception not-null property references a null or transient value: package.path.ClassName.created – Sumit Ramteke Feb 14 '14 at 9:41
  • @rishiAgar, No I haven't. But for now I have assign date to my property from default constructor. Will let you know once I found. – Sumit Ramteke Dec 29 '14 at 6:50
  • 1
    Change it to @Column(name = "updated", nullable = false, insertable = false) to make it work. Interesting that this answer got so many upvotes .. – Stefan Falk May 8 '15 at 21:56

You can just use @CreationTimestamp and @UpdateTimestamp:

@CreationTimestamp
@Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
@Column(name = "create_date")
private Date createDate;

@UpdateTimestamp
@Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
@Column(name = "modify_date")
private Date modifyDate;
  • 1
    thanks bro such a small thing need to update timestamp. I didnt know. you saved my day. – Virendra Sagar Jan 27 '17 at 14:28
  • There is TemporalType.DATE in the first case and TemporalType.TIMESTAMP in the second one. – v.ladynev Feb 8 '17 at 15:33
  • @v.ladynev thx, I've fixed it, actually it is up to you. – idmitriev Feb 8 '17 at 22:17
  • @igor-dmitriev You are welcome – v.ladynev Feb 8 '17 at 22:37
  • 1
    When I update the object and persist it, the bd lost the create_date... why? – Brenno Leal Oct 19 '17 at 2:04

You can also use an interceptor to set the values

Create an interface called TimeStamped which your entities implement

public interface TimeStamped {
    public Date getCreatedDate();
    public void setCreatedDate(Date createdDate);
    public Date getLastUpdated();
    public void setLastUpdated(Date lastUpdatedDate);
}

Define the interceptor

public class TimeStampInterceptor extends EmptyInterceptor {

    public boolean onFlushDirty(Object entity, Serializable id, Object[] currentState, 
            Object[] previousState, String[] propertyNames, Type[] types) {
        if (entity instanceof TimeStamped) {
            int indexOf = ArrayUtils.indexOf(propertyNames, "lastUpdated");
            currentState[indexOf] = new Date();
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public boolean onSave(Object entity, Serializable id, Object[] state, 
            String[] propertyNames, Type[] types) {
            if (entity instanceof TimeStamped) {
                int indexOf = ArrayUtils.indexOf(propertyNames, "createdDate");
                state[indexOf] = new Date();
                return true;
            }
            return false;
    }
}

And register it with the session factory

  • 1
    Works, thanks. Additional information docs.jboss.org/hibernate/core/4.0/manual/en-US/html_single/… – Andrii Nemchenko Mar 11 '12 at 23:45
  • This is one solution, if you work with SessionFactory instead of EntityManager! – olivmir Feb 27 at 14:07
  • Just for those, who suffer with a similar problem as I did in this context: if your entity does not itself define these extra fields (createdAt, ...) but inherit it from a parent class, then this parent class has to be annotated with @MappedSuperclass - otherwise Hibernate doesn't find these fields. – olivmir Feb 27 at 14:11

Thanks everyone who helped. After doing some research myself (I'm the guy who asked the question), here is what I found to make sense most:

  • Database column type: the timezone-agnostic number of milliseconds since 1970 represented as decimal(20) because 2^64 has 20 digits and disk space is cheap; let's be straightforward. Also, I will use neither DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, nor triggers. I want no magic in the DB.

  • Java field type: long. The Unix timestamp is well supported across various libs, long has no Y2038 problems, timestamp arithmetic is fast and easy (mainly operator < and operator +, assuming no days/months/years are involved in the calculations). And, most importantly, both primitive longs and java.lang.Longs are immutable—effectively passed by value—unlike java.util.Dates; I'd be really pissed off to find something like foo.getLastUpdate().setTime(System.currentTimeMillis()) when debugging somebody else's code.

  • The ORM framework should be responsible for filling in the data automatically.

  • I haven't tested this yet, but only looking at the docs I assume that @Temporal will do the job; not sure about whether I might use @Version for this purpose. @PrePersist and @PreUpdate are good alternatives to control that manually. Adding that to the layer supertype (common base class) for all entities, is a cute idea provided that you really want timestamping for all of your entities.

  • While longs and Longs may be immutable, that will not help you in the situation you describe. They can still say foo.setLastUpdate(new Long(System.currentTimeMillis()); – Ian McLaird Oct 23 '08 at 14:52
  • 2
    That's fine. Hibernate requires the setter anyway (or it will try to access the field directly through reflection). I was talking about difficulty chasing down who's modifying the timestamp from our application code. It is tricky when you can do that using a getter. – ngn Oct 23 '08 at 15:21
  • I agree with your claim that the ORM framework should be responsible for filling the date automatically, but I would go one step farther and say that the date should be set from the clock of the database server, rather than the client. I'm not clear if this accomplishes this goal. In sql, I can do this by using the sysdate function, but I don't know how to do this in Hibernate or any JPA implementation. – MiguelMunoz Jun 6 '17 at 21:12
  • I want no magic in the DB. I see what you mean, but I like to consider the fact that database should protect itself from bad/new/clueless developers. Data integrity is very important in a large company, you can't rely on others to insert good data. Constraints, defaults, and FKs will help achieve that. – Icegras Jul 12 '17 at 14:37

With Olivier's solution, during update statements you may run into:

com.mysql.jdbc.exceptions.jdbc4.MySQLIntegrityConstraintViolationException: Column 'created' cannot be null

To solve this, add updatable=false to the @Column annotation of "created" attribute:

@Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
@Column(name = "created", nullable = false, updatable=false)
private Date created;

In case you are using the Session API the PrePersist and PreUpdate callbacks won't work according to this answer.

I am using Hibernate Session's persist() method in my code so the only way I could make this work was with the code below and following this blog post (also posted in the answer).

@MappedSuperclass
public abstract class AbstractTimestampEntity {

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(name = "created")
    private Date created=new Date();

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(name = "updated")
    @Version
    private Date updated;

    public Date getCreated() {
        return created;
    }

    public void setCreated(Date created) {
        this.created = created;
    }

    public Date getUpdated() {
        return updated;
    }

    public void setUpdated(Date updated) {
        this.updated = updated;
    }
}
  • Should return cloned objects like updated.clone() otherwise other components can manipulate the internal state (date) – 1ambda Aug 6 '17 at 6:38

A good approach is to have a common base class for all your entities. In this base class, you can have your id property if it is commonly named in all your entities (a common design), your creation and last update date properties.

For the creation date, you simply keep a java.util.Date property. Be sure, to always initialize it with new Date().

For the last update field, you can use a Timestamp property, you need to map it with @Version. With this Annotation the property will get updated automatically by Hibernate. Beware that Hibernate will also apply optimistic locking (it's a good thing).

  • 1
    using a timestamp column for optimistic locking is a bad idea. Always use an integer version column. Reason being, 2 JVMs might be on different times and might not have millisecond accuracy. If you instead make hibernate use the DB timestamp, that would mean additional selects from the DB. Instead just use version number. – sethu Feb 18 '13 at 4:46

Just to reinforce: java.util.Calender is not for Timestamps. java.util.Date is for a moment in time, agnostic of regional things like timezones. Most database store things in this fashion (even if they appear not to; this is usually a timezone setting in the client software; the data is good)

As data type in JAVA I strongly recommend to use java.util.Date. I ran into pretty nasty timezone problems when using Calendar. See this Thread.

For setting the timestamps I would recommend using either an AOP approach or you could simply use Triggers on the table (actually this is the only thing that I ever find the use of triggers acceptable).

You might consider storing the time as a DateTime, and in UTC. I typically use DateTime instead of Timestamp because of the fact that MySql converts dates to UTC and back to local time when storing and retrieving the data. I'd rather keep any of that kind of logic in one place (Business layer). I'm sure there are other situations where using Timestamp is preferable though.

We had a similar situation. We were using Mysql 5.7.

CREATE TABLE my_table (
        ...
      updated_time TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    );

This worked for us.

protected by Will Jul 23 '10 at 13:50

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