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hello i am using JPanel as my container of my frame then i really want to used a background picture in my Panel i really need help this is my code so far . this is the updates please check here is my code now

 import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.*;


public class imagebut extends JFrame
{

public static void main(String args [])
{
    imagebut w = new imagebut();
    w.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    w.setSize(300,300);
    w.setVisible(true);

}
public imagebut()
{   

    setLayout(null); // :-)
    PicPanel mainPanel = new PicPanel("picturename.jpg");
    mainPanel.setBounds(0,0,500,500);
    add(mainPanel);


}

class PicPanel extends JPanel{

    private BufferedImage image;
    private int w,h;
    public PicPanel(String fname){

        //reads the image
        try {
            image = ImageIO.read(new File(fname));
            w = image.getWidth();
            h = image.getHeight();

        } catch (IOException ioe) {
            System.out.println("Could not read in the pic");
            //System.exit(0);
        }

    }

    public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
        return new Dimension(w,h);
    }
    //this will draw the image
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g){
        super.paintComponent(g);
        g.drawImage(image,0,0,this);
    }
}

}
  • Where does picturename.jpg reside? You can't simply copy and paste code and expect it to work, you're going to need to make some modifications so that it meets your needs – MadProgrammer Mar 4 '14 at 4:13
  • i create picturename.jpg then i put inside of my src folder – Batusai Mar 4 '14 at 4:19
  • ImageIO.read(new File(fname)) is looking for a file within the current directory where the program was executed, you've embedded the image as a embedded resource, they need to be loaded differently. Try using something like ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/picturename.jpg")) instead (assuming that picturename.jpg is at the root of src). Also, don't use null layouts, they will come back to leave teeth marks in your rear end – MadProgrammer Mar 4 '14 at 4:22
  • what do i need to use if instead of null ? – Batusai Mar 4 '14 at 4:27
  • For the (new) example you've pasted, get rid of setLayout(null);, get rid of mainPanel.setBounds(0,0,500,500); and add(mainPanel); and simply use setContentPane(mainPanel) – MadProgrammer Mar 4 '14 at 4:30
18

There are any number of ways this might be achieved.

You Could...

Disclaimer

Cavet, using a JLabel for this purpose may result in the contents over spilling the continer, see below for more details

Create a JLabel, apply the image to it's icon property and set this as the frames content pane. You would then need to set the layout manager appropriately, as JLabel doesn't have a default layout manager

JFrame frame = ...;
JLabel background = new JLabel(new ImageIcon(ImageIO.read(...)));
frame.setContentPane(background);
frame.setLayout(...);
frame.add(...);

Update with full example

label based example

import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.GridBagConstraints;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.ImageIcon;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class LabelBackground {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new LabelBackground();
    }

    public LabelBackground() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                try {
                    // Load the background image
                    BufferedImage img = ImageIO.read(new File("/path/to/your/image/on/disk"));

                    // Create the frame...
                    JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
                    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

                    // Set the frames content pane to use a JLabel
                    // whose icon property has been set to use the image
                    // we just loaded                        
                    frame.setContentPane(new JLabel(new ImageIcon(img)));

                    // Supply a layout manager for the body of the content
                    frame.setLayout(new GridBagLayout());
                    GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
                    gbc.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
                    // Add stuff...
                    frame.add(new JLabel("Hello world"), gbc);
                    frame.add(new JLabel("I'm on top"), gbc);
                    frame.add(new JButton("Clickity-clackity"), gbc);

                    frame.pack();
                    frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                    frame.setVisible(true);
                } catch (IOException exp) {
                    exp.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        });
    }
}

The problem with this is the JLabel won't resize the image when the frame is resized

WARNING - Using a JLabel could cause issues if the required space of the child components exceeds the size of the background image, as JLabel does not calculate it's preferred size based on it's contents, but based on its icon and text properties

You Could...

Create a custom component, extending from something like JPanel and override it's paintComponent method, painting the background as you see fit.

Take a look at Performing Custom Painting for more details.

This provides you with the ability to decide how best the image should be scaled when it's available space changes. While there are a number of ways this might be achived, you should read through The Perils of Image.getScaledInstance() to understand the pros and cons of them.

This raises a bunch of new questions, to you want to scale them and preserve the aspect ratio? If so, do you want to fit the image to available area or fill it (so it will always cover the available space)?

Take a look at Java: maintaining aspect ratio of JPanel background image for more details.

Other considerations

Images are generally best loaded through the ImageIO API, as it's capable of loading a wide range of images, but will also throw an IOException when something goes wrong.

See Reading/Loading an Image for more details.

The location of the image is also important. If the image is external to the application (somewhere on the file system), you can use ImageIO.read(new File("/path/to/image")). However, if the the image is embedded within your application (stored within the Jar for example), you will need to use something more like ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource("/path/to/image")) instead...

For example...

Example

This example demonstrates the use of a custom component which acts as the background component. When the components size exceeds the size of the background image, the image is scaled up to fill the available content area.

enter image description here

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.GridBagConstraints;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;
import java.awt.HeadlessException;
import java.awt.RenderingHints;
import java.awt.Transparency;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class SimpleBackground {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new SimpleBackground();
    }

    public SimpleBackground() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                try {
                    BackgroundPane background = new BackgroundPane();
                    background.setBackground(ImageIO.read(new File("/path/to/your/image/on/your/disk")));

                    JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
                    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                    frame.setContentPane(background);
                    frame.setLayout(new GridBagLayout());
                    GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
                    gbc.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
                    frame.add(new JLabel("Hello world"), gbc);
                    frame.add(new JLabel("I'm on top"), gbc);
                    frame.add(new JButton("Clickity-clackity"), gbc);
                    frame.pack();
                    frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                    frame.setVisible(true);
                } catch (IOException exp) {
                    exp.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public class BackgroundPane extends JPanel {

        private BufferedImage img;
        private BufferedImage scaled;

        public BackgroundPane() {
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return img == null ? super.getPreferredSize() : new Dimension(img.getWidth(), img.getHeight());
        }

        public void setBackground(BufferedImage value) {
            if (value != img) {
                this.img = value;
                repaint();
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void invalidate() {
            super.invalidate();
            if (getWidth() > img.getWidth() || getHeight() > img.getHeight()) {
                scaled = getScaledInstanceToFill(img, getSize());
            } else {
                scaled = img;
            }
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            if (scaled != null) {
                int x = (getWidth() - scaled.getWidth()) / 2;
                int y = (getHeight() - scaled.getHeight()) / 2;
                g.drawImage(scaled, x, y, this);
            }
        }

    }

    public static BufferedImage getScaledInstanceToFill(BufferedImage img, Dimension size) {

        double scaleFactor = getScaleFactorToFill(img, size);

        return getScaledInstance(img, scaleFactor);

    }

    public static double getScaleFactorToFill(BufferedImage img, Dimension size) {

        double dScale = 1;

        if (img != null) {

            int imageWidth = img.getWidth();
            int imageHeight = img.getHeight();

            double dScaleWidth = getScaleFactor(imageWidth, size.width);
            double dScaleHeight = getScaleFactor(imageHeight, size.height);

            dScale = Math.max(dScaleHeight, dScaleWidth);

        }

        return dScale;

    }

    public static double getScaleFactor(int iMasterSize, int iTargetSize) {

        double dScale = (double) iTargetSize / (double) iMasterSize;

        return dScale;

    }

    public static BufferedImage getScaledInstance(BufferedImage img, double dScaleFactor) {

        return getScaledInstance(img, dScaleFactor, RenderingHints.VALUE_INTERPOLATION_BILINEAR, true);

    }

    protected static BufferedImage getScaledInstance(BufferedImage img, double dScaleFactor, Object hint, boolean bHighQuality) {

        BufferedImage imgScale = img;

        int iImageWidth = (int) Math.round(img.getWidth() * dScaleFactor);
        int iImageHeight = (int) Math.round(img.getHeight() * dScaleFactor);

//        System.out.println("Scale Size = " + iImageWidth + "x" + iImageHeight);
        if (dScaleFactor <= 1.0d) {

            imgScale = getScaledDownInstance(img, iImageWidth, iImageHeight, hint, bHighQuality);

        } else {

            imgScale = getScaledUpInstance(img, iImageWidth, iImageHeight, hint, bHighQuality);

        }

        return imgScale;

    }

    protected static BufferedImage getScaledDownInstance(BufferedImage img,
            int targetWidth,
            int targetHeight,
            Object hint,
            boolean higherQuality) {

        int type = (img.getTransparency() == Transparency.OPAQUE)
                ? BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB : BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB;

        BufferedImage ret = (BufferedImage) img;
        if (targetHeight > 0 || targetWidth > 0) {
            int w, h;
            if (higherQuality) {
                // Use multi-step technique: start with original size, then
                // scale down in multiple passes with drawImage()
                // until the target size is reached
                w = img.getWidth();
                h = img.getHeight();
            } else {
                // Use one-step technique: scale directly from original
                // size to target size with a single drawImage() call
                w = targetWidth;
                h = targetHeight;
            }

            do {
                if (higherQuality && w > targetWidth) {
                    w /= 2;
                    if (w < targetWidth) {
                        w = targetWidth;
                    }
                }

                if (higherQuality && h > targetHeight) {
                    h /= 2;
                    if (h < targetHeight) {
                        h = targetHeight;
                    }
                }

                BufferedImage tmp = new BufferedImage(Math.max(w, 1), Math.max(h, 1), type);
                Graphics2D g2 = tmp.createGraphics();
                g2.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_INTERPOLATION, hint);
                g2.drawImage(ret, 0, 0, w, h, null);
                g2.dispose();

                ret = tmp;
            } while (w != targetWidth || h != targetHeight);
        } else {
            ret = new BufferedImage(1, 1, type);
        }
        return ret;
    }

    protected static BufferedImage getScaledUpInstance(BufferedImage img,
            int targetWidth,
            int targetHeight,
            Object hint,
            boolean higherQuality) {

        int type = BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB;

        BufferedImage ret = (BufferedImage) img;
        int w, h;
        if (higherQuality) {
            // Use multi-step technique: start with original size, then
            // scale down in multiple passes with drawImage()
            // until the target size is reached
            w = img.getWidth();
            h = img.getHeight();
        } else {
            // Use one-step technique: scale directly from original
            // size to target size with a single drawImage() call
            w = targetWidth;
            h = targetHeight;
        }

        do {
            if (higherQuality && w < targetWidth) {
                w *= 2;
                if (w > targetWidth) {
                    w = targetWidth;
                }
            }

            if (higherQuality && h < targetHeight) {
                h *= 2;
                if (h > targetHeight) {
                    h = targetHeight;
                }
            }

            BufferedImage tmp = new BufferedImage(w, h, type);
            Graphics2D g2 = tmp.createGraphics();
            g2.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_INTERPOLATION, hint);
            g2.drawImage(ret, 0, 0, w, h, null);
            g2.dispose();

            ret = tmp;
            tmp = null;

        } while (w != targetWidth || h != targetHeight);
        return ret;
    }

}

It would be a simple matter to also have the image scaled down when the space decreases, but I deliberately decided to maintain the image at it's smallest size.

The example also makes use of a custom divide and conquer scaling algrotithm in order to generate a high quality scaled result.

  • 1
    please edit my work sir for better understanding . – Batusai Mar 4 '14 at 3:43
  • 1
    Please read the links provided which provide example code – MadProgrammer Mar 4 '14 at 3:47
  • "please edit my work " ~ That's gratitude. – Eddie B Jan 18 '16 at 13:02
1
import java.awt.*;

import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.*;

import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.*;


public class imagebut extends JFrame
{

public static void main(String args [])
{
imagebut w = new imagebut();
w.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
w.setSize(300,300);
w.setVisible(true);

}
 public imagebut()
{   

setLayout(null); // :-)
PicPanel mainPanel = new PicPanel("picturename.jpg");
mainPanel.setBounds(0,0,500,500);
add(mainPanel);


  }

 class PicPanel extends JPanel{

private BufferedImage image;
private int w,h;
public PicPanel(String fname){

    //reads the image
    try {
        image = ImageIO.read(getClass().getResource(fname));
        w = image.getWidth();
        h = image.getHeight();

    } catch (IOException ioe) {
        System.out.println("Could not read in the pic");
        //System.exit(0);
    }

}

public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
    return new Dimension(w,h);
}
//this will draw the image
public void paintComponent(Graphics g){
    super.paintComponent(g);
    g.drawImage(image,0,0,this);
}
}

 }
  • how do i direct add background in my JPanel declare in my code sir for example ping.setBackground(Color.RED); i can set but only color . so i need it to be a picture something like that . – Batusai Mar 4 '14 at 3:41
  • Paste the code above inside your imagebut class. Then make a PicPanel. PicPanel p = new PicPanel(pictureNameHere); Then add the panel. – Solace Mar 4 '14 at 3:44
  • got an error sir . – Batusai Mar 4 '14 at 3:46
  • I have updated my answer with your code to make things easier. – Solace Mar 4 '14 at 3:52
  • 1
    null layouts are highly unrecommended in modern UIs, it is better to rely on the layout manager API and the pack method of the frame. – MadProgrammer Mar 4 '14 at 3:56
0
JPanel ping = new JPanel(){

@Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        super.paintComponent(g);

//draw hare what ever you want and it will be in the back of your components
   }
};
  • >.< i didnt get it . – Batusai Mar 4 '14 at 3:49
  • When you make the new panel override the paintComponent() method, this is the method that draws on the panel, Try this inside g.drawImage(background, 0, 0, this.getWidth(), this.getHeight(), null); – java-love Mar 4 '14 at 3:55

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