5

If I have this:

$results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE id=$id");

is there then any way to check how many rows which have a field-value of "Private" or "Company" ?

I need to show the user how many "Private" and "Company" records where found, without making another query. (There is a column called 'ad_type' which contains either "private" or "company")

I already know the mysql_num_rows for counting all rows!

EDIT: There are 500thousand records! So maybe an iteration through the result is slow, what do you think?

Thanks for all help :)

9 Answers 9

13

The above answers are great and all, but the currently checked answer will work very inefficiently should you be dealing with a large amount of data

Example of the above answer (via Gal)

$results = mysql_query("SELECT *,(SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table_name WHERE column=$value) count FROM table_name WHERE id=$id");

It's good and all, and it returns what you need but the obvious design flaw is that making your SQL server return the results then re-return them and look at just the count is very inefficient for large amounts of data.

Simply do this:

$results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE column=$value");
$num_rows = mysql_num_rows($result);

It will yield the same results and be much more efficient in the long run, additionally for larger amounts of data.

3
  • This won't retrieve him the results+count, only the count. Plus, you're query is incomplete, revise it.
    – Gal
    Commented Feb 8, 2010 at 13:38
  • 1
    The query was incomplete, it is now fixed to reflect the removing of the count function from the query. Additionally, Gal. It does count how many are contained in it. $num_rows has the number. It's more efficient in that manner since when passing a query back the server automatically passes the number of elements within the resultant set which is accessed by mysql_num_rows($result)
    – David
    Commented Feb 8, 2010 at 18:57
  • $result should be $results in: $num_rows = mysql_num_rows($result);
    – Lexib0y
    Commented Mar 28, 2020 at 1:57
4

If you don't want to change your query you could do a

$results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE id=$id");
$count = mysql_num_rows($results);
3

You can do something like:

$results = mysql_query("SELECT *,(SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table_name WHERE column=$value) count FROM table_name WHERE id=$id");

in order to fetch the number with sql.

2
  • Is this better than iteration through 500thousand records in terms of performance?
    – user188962
    Commented Feb 7, 2010 at 16:30
  • I think so (this would be the way i'd do it). Mysql filtering in this case is better than iterating through the result with php, especially if you have a very large number of rows.
    – Gal
    Commented Feb 7, 2010 at 16:35
2

steps to get a count():

  1. use mysql_query() to get count,
  2. use mysql_fetch_array() to get the only 1 row
  3. get the only one column of the row, this is the count,

here is an example, which check whether the email is already used:

// check whether email used
$check_email_sql = "select count(*) from users where email='$email'";
$row = mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query($check_email_sql));
$email_count = $row[0];
1

Iterate through the result set of rows and count the number of occurences of Private and Company in ad_type, respectively?

0
0

You can do

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table_name WHERE id=$id GROUP BY fieldvalue HAVING fieldvalue = "Private"
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table_name WHERE id=$id GROUP BY fieldvalue HAVING fieldvalue = "Company"

but that would be another query. But if you process the data anyway, you could simply sum up the number of "Private" and "Company" rows after doing the query.

0

In the case you don't have to get all results, use this.

SELECT ad_type, COUNT(*)
FROM table_name
WHERE (id=$id)
GROUP BY ad_type
HAVING ((ad_type = 'Private') OR (ad_type = 'Company'))

If you still have to fetch all the records where id = $id, it won't work. But executing such a query (once) before fetching the real data should be more efficient than using a subquery.

0

I guess this query would do the job:

SELECT ad_type, count(*) FROM table_name WHERE id=$id GROUP BY ad_type; 

I don't see any reason so far to use HAVING, since you probably want to show the user an overview of all the ad_type's found in DB (at least you didn't mention that there are other values for ad_type then the two given). I also strongly suggest NOT to use sub-queries; always try to use just one. If there's one thing that will slow your query down, it's a subquery (or subqueries).

Good luck!

-2

Iterate through the results of the query and keep a count of how many of each show up in local variables.

2
  • It could be up to 500thousand rows, would iteration be of choice here, or another query, or somehow use the cache to do things faster? Please help me out
    – user188962
    Commented Feb 7, 2010 at 16:25
  • You specified "without making another query", so I gave you an option without making another query. Commented Feb 7, 2010 at 16:53

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