282

I have a class as follows:

public class Tag {
    public Int32 Id { get; set; }
    public String Name { get; set; }
}

And I have two lists of tag:

List<Tag> tags1;
List<Tag> tags2;

I used LINQ's select to get the Ids of each tags list. And then:

List<Int32> ids1 = new List<Int32> { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
List<Int32> ids2 = new List<Int32> { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
List<Int32> ids3 = new List<Int32> { 2, 1, 3, 4 };
List<Int32> ids4 = new List<Int32> { 1, 2, 3, 5 };
List<Int32> ids5 = new List<Int32> { 1, 1, 3, 4 };

ids1 should be equal to ids2 and ids3 ... Both have the same numbers.

ids1 should not be equal to ids4 and to ids5 ...

I tried the following:

var a = ints1.Equals(ints2);
var b = ints1.Equals(ints3);

But both give me false.

What is the fastest way to check if the lists of tags are equal?

UPDATE

I am looking for POSTS which TAGS are exactly the same as the TAGS in a BOOK.

IRepository repository = new Repository(new Context());

IList<Tags> tags = new List<Tag> { new Tag { Id = 1 }, new Tag { Id = 2 } };

Book book = new Book { Tags = new List<Tag> { new Tag { Id = 1 }, new Tag { Id = 2 } } };

var posts = repository
  .Include<Post>(x => x.Tags)
  .Where(x => new HashSet<Int32>(tags.Select(y => y.Id)).SetEquals(book.Tags.Select(y => y.Id)))
  .ToList();

I am using Entity Framework and I get the error:

An exception of type 'System.NotSupportedException' occurred in mscorlib.dll but was not handled in user code

Additional information: LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method 'Boolean SetEquals(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1[System.Int32])' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression.

How do I solve this?

8
  • What do you mean by not equality exacly, do you mean all elements should be different or just they shouldn't contains same elements,at least there should be one different? Mar 4, 2014 at 14:00
  • Your sequence ids5 contains duplicates. Is that intentional? Mar 4, 2014 at 14:06
  • 1
    @Selman22 I mean that the two lists should contain exactly the same elements ... The order does not matter Mar 4, 2014 at 14:20
  • @dasblinkenlight Yes, it does not make since since in this case IDs are unique because they are primary keys. Mar 4, 2014 at 14:20
  • You may want to post the updated question separately, because after the edit the question will have an entirely different solution from anything that has been posted so far. Add [EF] tag, and make sure that the title of the new question says "comparing lists inside EF's Where clause" or something similar. Mar 4, 2014 at 14:26

5 Answers 5

530

Use SequenceEqual to check for sequence equality because Equals method checks for reference equality.

var a = ints1.SequenceEqual(ints2);

Or if you don't care about elements order use Enumerable.All method:

var a = ints1.All(ints2.Contains);

The second version also requires another check for Count because it would return true even if ints2 contains more elements than ints1. So the more correct version would be something like this:

var a = ints1.All(ints2.Contains) && ints1.Count == ints2.Count;

In order to check inequality just reverse the result of All method:

var a = !ints1.All(ints2.Contains)
15
  • 19
    Slow and doesn't handle duplicates. [1, 1, 2] != [1, 2, 2] Mar 4, 2014 at 15:42
  • 2
    @CodesInChaos according to OP's comment in the question duplicates doesn't matter Mar 4, 2014 at 15:55
  • 24
    Note: You might be used to using .All with a lambda like .All(i=> ints2.Contains(i)), but since list.Contains() matches the function signature of taking a int and returning a bool, then he is passing the function name directly as a predicate. Essentially the same as ints1.All(i=> ints2.Contains(i)). Just wanted to point this out in case others like me were initially confused.
    – AaronLS
    Jul 17, 2014 at 18:01
  • 49
    I would revert the order of the var a = ints1.All(ints2.Contains) && ints1.Count == ints2.Count; to var a = ints1.Count == ints2.Count && ints1.All(ints2.Contains);. A simple count comparison is likely much faster than the .All call. If counts are not equal it would return faster.
    – Spiralis
    Aug 24, 2015 at 4:21
  • 13
    I will downvote this answer because this does not apply for all cases, List A {a,a} and list B contains {b,a} now ListB.All(listA.contains) and LIstA.All(listB.contains) will give different results, since both have same count, we will get true in one of them even though both are different, it wont work if a list has multiple entries – Jul 19, 2018 at 7:17
158

List<T> equality does not check them element-by-element. You can use LINQ's SequenceEqual method for that:

var a = ints1.SequenceEqual(ints2);

To ignore order, use SetEquals:

var a = new HashSet<int>(ints1).SetEquals(ints2);

This should work, because you are comparing sequences of IDs, which do not contain duplicates. If it does, and you need to take duplicates into account, the way to do it in linear time is to compose a hash-based dictionary of counts, add one for each element of the first sequence, subtract one for each element of the second sequence, and check if the resultant counts are all zeros:

var counts = ints1
    .GroupBy(v => v)
    .ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());
var ok = true;
foreach (var n in ints2) {
    int c;
    if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out c)) {
        counts[n] = c-1;
    } else {
        ok = false;
        break;
    }
}
var res = ok && counts.Values.All(c => c == 0);

Finally, if you are fine with an O(N*LogN) solution, you can sort the two sequences, and compare them for equality using SequenceEqual.

13
  • 1
    With SequenceEqual the elements must be in the same order - OP wants the same elements in any order.
    – D Stanley
    Mar 4, 2014 at 13:57
  • 3
    @TimSchmelter That's what editing is for. How's it looking after the edit? Mar 4, 2014 at 14:01
  • 1
    @dasblinkenlight still will not work if either sequence contains duplcates - {1, 1, 2, 3} would be "equal" to {1, 2, 2, 3}
    – D Stanley
    Mar 4, 2014 at 14:03
  • 1
    @dasblinkenlight: maybe something like this would work: bool isEqual = ids1.Count == ids2.Count; if (isEqual) isEqual = ids1.OrderBy(i=>i).SequenceEqual(ids2.OrderBy(i => i));. Mar 4, 2014 at 14:06
  • 2
    @dasblinkenlight Sure it can. In fact the fifth sequence in the OP's exmaple does.
    – D Stanley
    Mar 4, 2014 at 14:06
30
Enumerable.SequenceEqual(FirstList.OrderBy(fElement => fElement), 
                         SecondList.OrderBy(sElement => sElement))
4
  • 9
    The name of your lambda parameter is weird. They're no list, they're an element. I'd either go with id in the OP's context, or element in a generic context. Mar 4, 2014 at 15:40
  • This guy clearly copied this answer from elsewhere since judging by the parameter names he doesn't even know what it does.. Feb 1, 2017 at 11:56
  • 2
    I think it covers exactly the issue at hand. It compares two lists, no matter the sequence. Apr 2, 2019 at 6:36
  • You can even add .Distinct() before the OrderBys if you want to compare and ignore duplicates. This is definitely not the most efficient method of comparing sets. HashSet.SetEquals ignores duplicates and order. Enumerable.SequenceEquals considers duplicates and preserves order.
    – Triynko
    Mar 9, 2022 at 20:01
2

The accepted answer for almost 10 years now (Selman answer) is not working for duplicate (in question we can see duplicates). You can try yourself with: {2, 2, 3} and {2, 3, 3} where Selman algo say equal. I agree its not obvious at first sight.

The second most voted up answer (Sergey) include comments that suggest a very fast algorithm. I made a little benchmark (code at the bottom). I included 3 answers (Selman, Sergey, Pankaj). I also added 2 new algorithms (Guru and EricO). According to my benchmark, Sergey algorithm is not very fast compare to some others. I know speed was not a criteria of the question itself, but author answer suggest a very efficient algorithm.

Included here, a little benchmark to compare proposed solutions plus 2 more. Far from being perfect and complete, the benchmark could give a good idea of validity and performance. I suggest that you check results before choosing what you want to implement in your own code.

Test code and compare functions implementations are below results. Thanks to Guru for its feedback and good idea on an algorithm (I think it worth to be an answer of its own ;-)).

Results:

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 3
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman    : 00:00:00.0006856. Equal: True  <<<<< ERROR
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.0045392. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.0019844. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.0002651. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.0005945. Equal: False
End Compare

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 10000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:11.6260563. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:03.2376179. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:01.0078811. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:01.5709527. Equal: True
End Compare

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 10000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:12.9824722. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:03.8619141. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:01.0829506. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:02.0760940. Equal: False
End Compare

Start Compare for String of size: 10000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:16.3923001. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:54.0820172. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:53.5317528. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:05.9972781. Equal: True
End Compare

Start Compare for String of size: 10000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:14.3085444. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:54.4835349. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:53.6763668. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:05.6920709. Equal: False
End Compare

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 1000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.7707951. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.2131278. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.0892336. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.5455456. Equal: True
End Compare

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 1000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.5982986. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.2248797. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.0937744. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.1462340. Equal: False
End Compare

Start Compare for String of size: 1000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:01.3971059. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:04.3682767. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:03.7275648. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.4822032. Equal: True
End Compare

Start Compare for String of size: 1000000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:01.1479243. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:04.2601652. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:03.7690159. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.2350588. Equal: False
End Compare

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 100000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.1446754. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.0212269. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.0087268. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.0081945. Equal: True
End Compare

Start Compare for Int32 of size: 100000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.0245328. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.0232001. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.0075184. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.0139519. Equal: False
End Compare

Start Compare for String of size: 100000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.0808056. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.2401923. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.1936675. Equal: True
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.0392954. Equal: True
End Compare

Start Compare for String of size: 100000
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey    : 00:00:00.1257959. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj    : 00:00:00.2398588. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru      : 00:00:00.2811503. Equal: False
CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO     : 00:00:00.0406129. Equal: False
End Compare

Test Code:

using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text;
using General.Compare;

namespace ConsoleAppTestEnumCompare
{
    internal class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Show error in accepted solution of SO question
            int[] itemsToShowStackOverflowAcceptedAnswerError = new int[] { 2, 2, 3 };
            int[] itemsToShowStackOverflowAcceptedAnswerError2 = new int[] { 2, 3, 3 };
            Test(itemsToShowStackOverflowAcceptedAnswerError, itemsToShowStackOverflowAcceptedAnswerError2);

            // Major tests for int and string
            foreach (var countOfInt in new int[] { 100000000, 10000000, 1000000, 100000 })
            {
                Random rnd = new Random();
                List<int> list1 = new List<int>();
                for (int i = 0; i < countOfInt; i++)
                {
                    list1.Add(rnd.Next(list1.Count));
                }
                List<int> list2 = new List<int>(list1);
                list2.Sort();

                Test(list1, list2);

                list1[list1.Count / 2] = list1[list1.Count / 2] + 1;

                Test(list1, list2);

                List<string> listString1 = new List<string>();
                StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
                for (int i = 0; i < countOfInt; i++)
                {
                    sb.Clear();
                    int stringSize = rnd.Next(1, 12);
                    for (int n = 0; n < stringSize; n++)
                    {
                        sb.Append((char)rnd.Next((int)'a', (int)'z'));
                    }

                    listString1.Add(sb.ToString());
                }
                List<string> listString2 = new List<string>(listString1);
                listString2.Sort();

                Test(listString1, listString2);

                listString1[listString1.Count / 2] = listString1[listString1.Count / 2] + 1;

                Test(listString1, listString2);
            }
        }

        static void Test<T>(IEnumerable<T> list1, IEnumerable<T> list2)
        {
            (Func<IEnumerable<T>, IEnumerable<T>, bool> Compare, string Name)[] compareActions = new (Func<IEnumerable<T>, IEnumerable<T>, bool>, string)[5];
            compareActions[0] = (CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman, nameof(CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman));
            compareActions[1] = (CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey, nameof(CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey));
            compareActions[2] = (CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj, nameof(CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj));
            compareActions[3] = (CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru, nameof(CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru));
            compareActions[4] = (CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO, nameof(CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO));

            Debug.WriteLine($"Start Compare for {typeof(T).Name} of size: {list1.Count()}");
            Console.WriteLine($"Start Compare for {typeof(T).Name} of size: {list1.Count()}");

            bool areListsEqual;
            Stopwatch stopwatch;
             
            foreach(var compareAction in compareActions)
            {
                if (list1.Count() > 100 && compareAction.Name == nameof(CompareEnumerableExtension.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman)) 
                {
                    continue; // Too slow and does not work
                }

                stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                areListsEqual = compareAction.Compare(list1, list2);
                stopwatch.Stop();
                Debug.WriteLine($"{compareAction.Name, -33}  : {stopwatch.Elapsed}. Equal: {areListsEqual}");
                Console.WriteLine($"{compareAction.Name, -33}  : {stopwatch.Elapsed}. Equal: {areListsEqual}");
            }

            Debug.WriteLine("End Compare");
            Console.WriteLine("End Compare");

            Debug.WriteLine("");
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }
}

Compare functions:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace General.Compare
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Based on question: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/22173762/check-if-two-lists-are-equal
    /// </summary>
    public static class CompareEnumerableExtension
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Check for Equality where items should be in the same order
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="enum1"></param>
        /// <param name="enum2"></param>
        /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
        public static bool CompareEnumerableInSameOrder<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        {
            return enum1.SequenceEqual(enum2);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Check for Equality in ANY order (SLOW).
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="enum1"></param>
        /// <param name="enum2"></param>
        /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
        public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        {
            return Enumerable.SequenceEqual(enum1.OrderBy(fElement => fElement), enum2.OrderBy(sElement => sElement));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Check for Equality in ANY order (VERY SLOW). In reality, it just does not work with duplicate.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="enum1"></param>
        /// <param name="enum2"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2) 
        {
            return enum1.Count() == enum2.Count() && enum1.All(enum2.Contains);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Check for Equality in ANY order. Supposed to be Fast (according to Author in SO) but very slow.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="enum1"></param>
        /// <param name="enum2"></param>
        /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
        public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        {
            var counts = enum1.GroupBy(v => v).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());
            var ok = true;
            foreach (var n in enum2)
            {
                if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out int c))
                {
                    counts[n] = c - 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    ok = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return ok && counts.Values.All(c => c == 0);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Check for Equality in ANY order (ORDER DESTRUCTIVE on LIST). Just for fun.
        /// Code based on suggestion from "Guru Stron" on comments of my first answer
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="enum1"></param>
        /// <param name="enum2"></param>
        /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
        public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        {
            var list1 = new List<T>(enum1);
            list1.Sort();

            var list2 = new List<T>(enum2);
            list2.Sort();

            return Enumerable.SequenceEqual(list1, list2);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Check for Equality in ANY order (Fast). Support null
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="enum1"></param>
        /// <param name="enum2"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        {
            if (enum1.Count() != enum2.Count())
                return false;

            // null value is never insert in the map, they are calculated outside of it.
#pragma warning disable CS8714 // The type cannot be used as type parameter in the generic type or method. Nullability of type argument doesn't match 'notnull' constraint.
            Dictionary<T, int> counts = new Dictionary<T, int>(enum1.Count());
#pragma warning restore CS8714 // The type cannot be used as type parameter in the generic type or method. Nullability of type argument doesn't match 'notnull' constraint.

            int nullCount = 0;

            foreach (var n in enum1)
            {
                if (n == null)
                {
                    nullCount++;
                    continue;
                }

                if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out int c))
                {
                    counts[n] = c + 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    counts[n] = 1;
                }
            }

            var ok = true;
            foreach (var n in enum2)
            {
                if (n == null)
                {
                    nullCount++;
                    continue;
                }

                if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out int c))
                {
                    counts[n] = c - 1;
                }
                else
                {
                    ok = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return ok && nullCount == 0 && counts.Values.All(c => c == 0);
        }
    }
}
14
  • 1
    You are right on some points, like duplicates amount or simply the data type (where it was 'int' in the question but could be really different in reality). I think that Stopwatch is OK (not perfect but sufficient in this case). The worse problem I see in my test is the usage of debug mode which could lead to pretty biased behaviors. I will try in release and perhaprs your tool. But I already lost a lot of time just doing this and publishing it for the community just as pure information only. I was only based on some programmer instinct that Sergey code wasn't that fast and had some slowness Nov 30, 2023 at 21:25
  • 1
    Also I suggest trying List<T>.Sort in addition to OrderBy approach (when preserving original order is not needed in-place sorting can save quite some time compared to LINQ).
    – Guru Stron
    Nov 30, 2023 at 21:33
  • 1
    Check out this answer. Though again it should not beat the counting approach due to the complexity (O(n) vs O(n log n) if I'm correct - it's a bit late for me =) )
    – Guru Stron
    Nov 30, 2023 at 21:41
  • 1
    @GuruStron, You are 100% right, my tests were biased and still they are. But I added string just to give a better overview. One another reason was that you were faster than me on "int" ;-) !!! Thanks for your advise. I'm too lazy for using BEnchmarkDotNet but thank you very much for let me know. I'm really happy to know the existence of that tool. 👍 Dec 1, 2023 at 5:47
  • 2
    Just a small nitpick - "The accepted answer for almost 10 years now is just not working." - it still works (or it was never working depending on point of view) - the answer clearly does not take duplicates into account and it can be a valid case (especially that OP does not have duplicates except for id5 which can be a typo)
    – Guru Stron
    Dec 1, 2023 at 20:41
-1

I did the benchmark of @eric-ouellet post, including my version (kinda same of eric's solution with a little refactoring + early loop break).

I don't fully understand how BenchMarkDotNet work behind the scene, and can't really get it why there is so much difference from means of methods to other ones.

EDIT (brief explanation) :

I did my benchmark against 100 random pairs of int[10] and 100 random pairs of string[10] arrays.

They have a probability that each of the 2 second generated ones are either simply the first one shuffled, or a new random one with a recursing probability of corrupted (a random item value set to default) datas to handle several scenarii.

Not used in my benchmark, but it could also generate a random array's length centered of the expected length.

/// The class that will be the entry point of my benchmarks
public class EnumerableComparison
{
    /// Set the size and length of my randomly generated enumerable to benchmark.
    private const int _batchSize = 100;
    private const int _batchLength = 10;

    /// Calling our (static) algorithms from this (benchmark) class.
    /// Decorate each call with [Benchmark] attribute to tell
    /// BenchmarkDotNet to benchmark this method.
    /// Also with [ArgumentsSource(Rnd***Datas)] to tell
    /// BenchMarkDotNet to provide our benchmarked methods with
    /// arguments generated with the Rnd***Datas() method.

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool OnlyOrdered_Duplicate(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableInSameOrder<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool OnlyOrdered_Duplicate(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableInSameOrder<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableInSameOrder<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.CompareEnumerableInSameOrder(second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_Pankaj(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_Pankaj(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj(second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_NoDuplicate_Selman(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_NoDuplicate_Selman(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman(second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_Sergey(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_Sergey(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey(second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_Guru(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_Guru(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru(second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_EricO(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_EricO(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO(second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndIntDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_TRex(int[] first, int[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderTRexAll<int>(first, second);

    [Benchmark]
    [ArgumentsSource(nameof(RndStringDatas))]
    public bool AnyOrder_Duplicate_TRex(string[] first, string[] second)
        => CompareEnumerableAnyOrderTRexAll<string>(first, second);

    public bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderTRexAll<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
        => first.EnumerableEqualsAllV3(second);    

    /// <summary>
    /// Generate a pair of <typeparamref name="T"/>[] having a centered length
    /// of <paramref name="batchLength"/>, that could be randomly altered 
    /// according to <paramref name="lengthVariation"/> value.
    /// The first one is using <paramref name="selector"/> delegate
    /// to generate the <typeparamref name="T"/> items
    /// and second one is either the first one shuffled according to 
    /// <paramref name="copyProbability"/> value,
    /// or a new generated one using <paramref name="selector"/> delegate again
    /// Both have a <paramref name="duplicationProbability"/>
    /// recursing probability to duplicate a random generated element
    /// and a <paramref name="corruptProbability"/>
    /// recursing probability to corrupt a random generated element.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">
    /// The type of generated pairs of <typeparamref name="T"/>[]
    /// </typeparam>
    /// <param name="batchSize">
    /// The number of generated pairs of <typeparamref name="T"/>[]
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="batchLength">
    /// The length of generated pairs of <typeparamref name="T"/>[]
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="selector">
    /// The delegate to transform the index of generated 
    /// <see cref="IEnumerable{int}"/> into an <typeparamref name="T"/>[]
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="corruptProbability">
    /// The probability to corrupt (set to default(<typeparamref name="T"/>))"/>
    /// a random element of the generated pairs
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="copyProbability">
    /// The probability that the second element of the generated pair is simply
    /// the first element of the pair shuffled.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="duplicationProbability">
    /// The recursive probability that a random element of 
    /// a generated <typeparamref name="T"/>[] is duplicated.
    /// </param>
    /// <param name="lengthVariation">
    /// The percentage amount to randomly modify <paramref name="batchLength"/>
    /// </param>
    /// <returns>
    /// A <see cref="IEnumerable{object}"/> whose all item are a generated pair
    /// of <typeparamref name="T"/>[]
    /// </returns>

    public IEnumerable<object[]> RandomizedDatas<T>(
        int batchSize, 
        int batchLength, 
        Func<int, T> selector, 
        int corruptProbability = 5, 
        int copyProbability = 20, 
        int duplicationProbability = 50, 
        double lengthVariation = 0.0)
    {
        batchLength = Math.Abs(batchLength);
        lengthVariation = Math.Clamp(lengthVariation, 0.0, 1.0);
        copyProbability = Math.Clamp(copyProbability, 0, 100);
        corruptProbability = Math.Clamp(corruptProbability, 0, 99);
        duplicationProbability = Math.Clamp(duplicationProbability, 0, 99);
        
        T[]? sample1, sample2;
        for (int i = 0; i < batchSize; i++)
        {
            sample1 = Enumerable.Range(1, Math.Max(1, Helper.StaticRandom.Next((int)Math.Floor(batchLength * (1.0 - lengthVariation)), (int)Math.Ceiling(batchLength * (1.0 + lengthVariation)))))
            .Select(selector).ToArray();

                while (Helper.StaticRandom.Next(0, 101) < duplicationProbability)
                    sample1 = sample1.AddRandomDuplicate();

            while (Helper.StaticRandom.Next(0, 101) < corruptProbability)
                sample1 = sample1.Corrupt();

            if (Helper.StaticRandom.Next(0, 101) < copyProbability)
                sample2 = sample1.CopyShuffle();
            else
            {
                sample2 = Enumerable.Range(1, Math.Max(1, Helper.StaticRandom.Next((int)Math.Floor(batchLength * (1.0 - lengthVariation)), (int)Math.Ceiling(batchLength * (1.0 + lengthVariation)))))
                .Select(selector).ToArray();

                while (Helper.StaticRandom.Next(0, 101) < duplicationProbability)
                    sample2 = sample2.AddRandomDuplicate();

                while (Helper.StaticRandom.Next(0, 101) < corruptProbability)
                    sample2 = sample2.Corrupt();
            }

            yield return new object[] { sample1, sample2 };
        }
    }

    public IEnumerable<object[]> RndIntDatas()
        => RandomizedDatas(_batchSize, _batchLength, _ => Helper.StaticRandom.Next(1, _batchLength*10));
    
    public IEnumerable<object[]> RndStringDatas()
        => RandomizedDatas(_batchSize, _batchLength, _ => Helper.RandomString(Helper.StaticRandom.Next(1, _batchLength)));  
}

And

public static class Helper
{
    private static Random _staticRandom = new();
    public static Random StaticRandom => _staticRandom;

    private const string ALPHANUMERICAL = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";

    public static string RandomString(int lenght)
    {
        var stringChars = new char[lenght];

        for (int i = 0; i < stringChars.Length; i++)
        {
            stringChars[i] = ALPHANUMERICAL[_staticRandom.Next(ALPHANUMERICAL.Length)];
        }

        return new string(stringChars);
    }

    public static T[] CopyShuffle<T>(this T[] values)
    {
        T[] shuffled = new T[values.Length];
        values.CopyTo(shuffled, 0);

        Random.Shared.Shuffle(shuffled);

        return shuffled;
    }

    public static T[] Corrupt<T>(this T[] values)
    {
        values[StaticRandom.Next(0, values.Length)] = default;
        return values;
    }

    public static T[] AddDuplicate<T>(this T[] values, int index)
    {
        if (values == null || index >= values.Length)
            return values;

        return values.Concat(new T[] { values[index] }).ToArray();
    }

    public static T[] AddRandomDuplicate<T>(this T[] values)
    {
        if (values == null || values.Length == 0)
            return values;

        return values.AddDuplicate(StaticRandom.Next(0, values.Length));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for Equality where items should be in the same order
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="enum1"></param>
    /// <param name="enum2"></param>
    /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
    public static bool CompareEnumerableInSameOrder<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        => enum1.SequenceEqual(enum2);

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for Equality in ANY order (SLOW).
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="enum1"></param>
    /// <param name="enum2"></param>
    /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
    public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderPankaj<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        => Enumerable.SequenceEqual(enum1.OrderBy(fElement => fElement), enum2.OrderBy(sElement => sElement));

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for Equality in ANY order (VERY SLOW). In reality, it just does not work with duplicate.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="enum1"></param>
    /// <param name="enum2"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSelman<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
        => enum1.Count() == enum2.Count() && enum1.All(enum2.Contains);

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for Equality in ANY order. Supposed to be Fast (according to Author in SO) but very slow.
    /// Error on NULL element !
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="enum1"></param>
    /// <param name="enum2"></param>
    /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
    public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderSergey<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
    {
        var counts = enum1.GroupBy(v => v).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());
        var ok = true;
        foreach (var n in enum2)
        {
            if (n == null)///ADDED to avoid crash
                return false;

            if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out int c))
            {
                counts[n] = c - 1;
            }
            else
            {
                ok = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        return ok && counts.Values.All(c => c == 0);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for Equality in ANY order (ORDER DESTRUCTIVE on LIST). Just for fun.
    /// Code based on suggestion from "Guru Stron" on comments of my first answer
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="enum1"></param>
    /// <param name="enum2"></param>
    /// <returns>return true if both are equals</returns>
    public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderGuru<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
    {
        var list1 = new List<T>(enum1);
        list1.Sort();

        var list2 = new List<T>(enum2);
        list2.Sort();

        return Enumerable.SequenceEqual(list1, list2);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for Equality in ANY order (Fast). Support null
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="enum1"></param>
    /// <param name="enum2"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool CompareEnumerableAnyOrderEricO<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enum1, IEnumerable<T> enum2)
    {
        if (enum1.Count() != enum2.Count())
            return false;

        // null value is never insert in the map, they are calculated outside of it.
#pragma warning disable CS8714 // The type cannot be used as type parameter in the generic type or method. Nullability of type argument doesn't match 'notnull' constraint.
        Dictionary<T, int> counts = new Dictionary<T, int>(enum1.Count());
#pragma warning restore CS8714 // The type cannot be used as type parameter in the generic type or method. Nullability of type argument doesn't match 'notnull' constraint.

        int nullCount = 0;

        foreach (var n in enum1)
        {
            if (n == null)
            {
                nullCount++;
                continue;
            }

            if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out int c))
            {
                counts[n] = c + 1;
            }
            else
            {
                counts[n] = 1;
            }
        }

        var ok = true;
        foreach (var n in enum2)
        {
            if (n == null)
            {
                nullCount++;
                continue;
            }

            if (counts.TryGetValue(n, out int c))
            {
                counts[n] = c - 1;
            }
            else
            {
                ok = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        return ok && nullCount == 0 && counts.Values.All(c => c == 0);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check for equality in Any order. Handle duplicate 
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of elements in <paramref name="first"/> and <paramref name="second"/> <see cref="IEnumerable{T}"/> to test equality </typeparam>
    /// <param name="first">The first <see cref="IEnumerable{T}"/> to test equality against <paramref name="second"/></param>
    /// <param name="second">The second <see cref="IEnumerable{T}"/> to test equality against <paramref name="first"/></param>
    /// <returns>True if <paramref name="first"/> exactly have same elements than those in <paramref name="second"/> without taking order in consideration (duplicate are important)</returns>
    public static bool EnumerableEqualsAllV3<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
    {
        if (first == default && second == default)
            return true;

        if (first == default || second == default)
            return false;

        if (ReferenceEquals(first, second))
            return true;

        int firstCount = first.Count();

        if (firstCount != second.Count())
            return false;

        IDictionary<T, int> mappedCount = new Dictionary<T, int>(firstCount);

        int nullCount = 0;            

        foreach (T item in first)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                nullCount++;
                continue;
            }

            if (mappedCount.ContainsKey(item))
            {
                mappedCount[item]++;
            }
            else
            {
                mappedCount[item] = 1;
            }
        }

        foreach (T item in second)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                nullCount--;
                continue;
            }

            if (!mappedCount.ContainsKey(item))
                return false;

            mappedCount[item]--;
        }

        return mappedCount.Values.All(count => count == 0);
    }
}

Here are (pre edited) the results. (too long to be post in this post unfortunately, so is the use of pastebin site).

2
  • It's not very useful to add this long listing of bare results, esp. not in an external link that is inevitably going to break one day. Aggregate these results and discuss the conclusions. Mar 2 at 18:25
  • I slightly modified the code so Ill run another benchmark, but it take time (8h +/-). To aggregate I searched an option in BenchmarkDotNet, but couldn't find one that will merge all result of same method across my 2 * 100 random testing sample. Could do it aside with the generated log.
    – TRex
    Mar 2 at 19:16

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