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I have some data I have sampled from a radar satellite image and wanted to perform some statistical tests on. Before this I wanted to conduct a normality test so I could be sure my data was normally distributed. My data appears to be normally distributed but when I perform the test Im getting a Pvalue of 0, suggesting my data is not normally distributed.

I have attached my code along with the output and a histogram of the distribution (Im relatively new to python so apologies if my code is clunky in any way). Can anyone tell me if Im doing something wrong - I find it hard to believe from my histogram that my data is not normally distributed?

values = 'inputfile.h5'
f = h5py.File(values,'r')
dset = f['/DATA/DATA']
array = dset[...,0]
print('normality =', scipy.stats.normaltest(array))
max = np.amax(array)
min = np.amin(array)

histo = np.histogram(array, bins=100, range=(min, max))
freqs = histo[0]
rangebins = (max - min)
numberbins = (len(histo[1])-1)
interval = (rangebins/numberbins)
newbins = np.arange((min), (max), interval)
histogram = bar(newbins, freqs, width=0.2, color='gray')
plt.show()

This prints this: (41099.095955202931, 0.0). the first element is a chi-square value and the second is a pvalue.

I have made a graph of the data which I have attached. I thought that maybe as Im dealing with negative values it was causing a problem so I normalised the values but the problem persists.

histogram of values in array

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    This question explains why you're getting such a small p-value. Essentially, normality tests almost always reject the null on very large sample sizes (in yours, for example, you can see just a little bit of skew in the left side, which at your enormous sample size is way more than enough) Mar 4, 2014 at 17:45
  • @unutbu: That's not true: to demonstrate, normaltest(np.random.normal(loc=100, scale=10, size=1000)) still returns uniform p-values even though the mean is 100 and the standard deviation 10. Mar 4, 2014 at 18:05
  • 1
    This is a bit late, but for future readers: min and max are keywords in python, so I would advice not to use them as variables. May 8, 2018 at 6:54

2 Answers 2

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This question explains why you're getting such a small p-value. Essentially, normality tests almost always reject the null on very large sample sizes (in yours, for example, you can see just some skew in the left side, which at your enormous sample size is way more than enough).

What would be much more practically useful in your case is to plot a normal curve fit to your data. Then you can see how the normal curve actually differs (for example, you can see whether the tail on the left side does indeed go too long). For example:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.mlab as mlab

n, bins, patches = plt.hist(array, 50, normed=1)
mu = np.mean(array)
sigma = np.std(array)
plt.plot(bins, mlab.normpdf(bins, mu, sigma))

(Note the normed=1 argument: this ensures that the histogram is normalized to have a total area of 1, which makes it comparable to a density like the normal distribution).

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In general when the number of samples is less than 50, you should be careful about using tests of normality. Since these tests need enough evidences to reject the null hypothesis, which is "the distribution of the data is normal", and when the number of samples is small they are not able to find those evidences.

Keep in mind that when you fail to reject the null hypothesis it does not mean that the alternative hypothesis is correct.

There is another possibility that: Some implementations of the statistical tests for normality compare the distribution of your data to standard normal distribution. In order to avoid this, I suggest you to standardize the data and then apply the test of normality.

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