13

I have a Spring application that uses various configuration parameters that are persisted in a database. In order to minimize database access cycles, I have created a Singleton class that holds the parameters in a Properties object. There are occasions when the Properties object needs to be refreshed during the running of the application, so to this end I have a load() method and a reload() method. To access the database, I have an @Autowired service object. Simplifying a little:

public class AppConfig {
    private static AppConfig instance = null;
    private Properties appProperties;

    @Autowired ConfiguraitonService configService;

    protected AppConfig() {
        load();
    }

    public static AppConfig getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new AppConfig();
        }
        return instance;
    }

    public void reload() {
        load();
    }

    private void load() {
        List<Configuration> configList configService.findAll()

        for (Configuration myConfiguration : configList) {
          if (myConfiguration != null && myConfiguration.getAttribute() != null) {
                appProperties.setProperty(myConfiguration.getAttribute(),myConfiguration.getValue());
            }
        }
    }

public String getValue(String key) {
    return appProperties.getProperty(key);
}

In the Spring configuration file, I have:

<bean id="appConfigBean" class="foo.bar.AppConfig"></bean>

Calling 'getValue' against this Singleton generates a null pointer exception. I understand that this is in someway connected to @Autowired and a failure to initialise correctly, although I don't understand why. I guess my question relates to the best approach for resolving this issue.

For others, this is the modified code that worked:

public class AppConfig {
    private static Properties myProperties = new Properties();

    @Autowired
    private ConfigurationService configService;
    private static AppConfig instance = null;

    protected AppConfig() {
    }

    public static AppConfig getInstance() {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new AppConfig();
        }
        return instance;
    }

    @PostConstruct
    public void load() {        
        List<Configuration> configList = configService.findAll();

        for (Configuration myConfiguration : configList) {
            if (myConfiguration != null && myConfiguration.getAttribute() != null) {
                myProperties.setProperty(myConfiguration.getAttribute(), myConfiguration.getValue());
            }
        }
    }
2
  • What version of Spring are you using? Did you include <context:annotation-config /> ? – user2793390 Mar 4 '14 at 22:40
  • I am using Spring 3.1.4. I don't really understand the role of <context:annotation-config />, however I am using <context:component-scan /> – skyman Mar 4 '14 at 23:01
11

When you constructor calls load() the Autowired dependencies are still unwired. The wiring takes place after the constructor has finished. Either make configService final and use constructor autowiring or remove load() from your constructor but annotate load() with @PostConstruct.

1
  • Thank you Dirk - this worked! I have added the working code above for others benefit - much appreciated. – skyman Mar 4 '14 at 23:31
1

For anyone stumbling on this post trying to make some kind of static property storing mechanism using Spring, I have created a nice singleton class you can use which allows for centralizing properties pulled either from the environment (text file properties in my case) and/or from a database using a service. The refreshParameters() method can be called statically from anywhere in your code in order to pull all the properties from their respective sources again (this could be broken down into different methods to allow pulling only certain types of properties for example). The neat thing is that access to the underlying instance is completely hidden by relying on the getter methods to query the instance field.

The drawback is that we are injecting a static context via setter injection which is generally not recommended but it seems to be required to allow pulling the instance bean from the context statically (please let me know if there is another way!). Also, I'm sure its thread safety could be improved but this works perfectly for my needs :

package com.somepackage.utilities;

import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext;
import org.springframework.core.env.Environment;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

import com.somepackage.service.GlobalParamService;

import lombok.RequiredArgsConstructor;

@Component
@RequiredArgsConstructor
@Log4j2
public class ParameterUtils
{
    private static ParameterUtils instance = null;

    //Core
    private boolean headless = false;

    //Logging
    private String logLevel = "";

    private static ApplicationContext applicationContext;
    private final Environment environment;
    private final GlobalParamService globalParamService;

    @PostConstruct
    //Runs on bean creation to initialize parameters from environment and DB, is also 
        //called by the refreshParameters() method
    private void init()
    {
        //Core
        headless = !environment.getProperty("serviceGUI").equals("ON");

        //Logging
        logLevel = globalParamService.findByName("logLevel").getValue();
    }

    //creates instance if null, getting the ParameterUtils bean from the static 
        //context autowired via setter-injection
    private synchronized static ParameterUtils getInstance() 
    { 
        if (instance == null) 
       { 
            instance = applicationContext.getBean(ParameterUtils.class);
        } 

        return instance; 
    } 

    //Refreshes all parameters by querying the environment and DB again
    public static void refreshParameters()
    {
        getInstance().init();
    }

    //Core
    public static boolean headless()
    {
        return getInstance().headless;
    }

    //Logging
    public static String logLevel()
    {
        return getInstance().logLevel;
    }

    @Autowired
    //Autowires static context to allow creating the fully autowired 
        //instance variable with a getBean() call;
    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext)
    {
        ParameterUtils.applicationContext = applicationContext;
    }
}

With this, from anywhere in my code and statically, I can then just do ParameterUtils.headless() to see if I'm running in headless mode. This class eliminated hundreds of lines of code in my program.

******EDIT******

You could get fancy and replace the individual getter methods with a single one with variable return type using reflection, as I ended up doing :

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> T getParameter(String name, Class<T> returnType)
{
    try 
    {
        return (T) Stream.of(getInstance().getClass().getDeclaredFields())
                        .filter((field) -> field.getName().equals(name))
                        .findAny().get().get(instance);
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) 
    {
        instance.logEntryService.logError(LogEntrySource.SERVICE, LogEntryType.CORE, "Error retrieving " + name 
            + " parameter : " + ex.getMessage(), log);
    }

    return null;
}

In this case calls to ParameterUtils would look like this :

boolean headless = ParameterUtils.getParameter("headless", boolean.class);

Note that you will need @SuppressWarnings("unused") on top of your class to avoid warnings about fields not being used. They are very much being used, reflectively.

Feel free to steal this or to suggest improvements!

Cheers!

3
  • how is a class allowing to get parameters from a DB and a properties file a god class? Just asking... – Martin Feb 5 '20 at 20:31
  • B/c classes like this tend to handle concerns from many parts of the system. Even in your sample class with only two properties you are mixing ui and logging aspects. Over time this will grow into something you really don’t want to have. It‘s a complicated way to build globals. Been there and therefor know firsthand that that‘s a bad idea. – Dirk Lachowski Feb 6 '20 at 17:08
  • I don't entirely disagree with you on some parts but ultimately this is a class that is used to fetch properties. That is all it does, from 2 different sources sure, but ultimately it has one job to do and that's deliver properties. I guess it depends where you draw the line but I don't consider this a god class since, again, it has one purpose ultimately. – Martin Feb 6 '20 at 18:03

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