593

I have an object that contains an array of objects.

things = new Object();

things.thing = new Array();

things.thing.push({place:"here",name:"stuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});

I'm wondering what is the best method to remove duplicate objects from an array. So for example, things.thing would become...

{place:"here",name:"stuff"},
{place:"there",name:"morestuff"}
4
  • Do you mean how do you stop a hashtable/object with all the same parameters being added to an array? Feb 8 '10 at 0:46
  • 5
    Mathew -> If it is simpler to prevent a duplicate object from being added to the array in the first place, instead of filtering it out later, yes, that would be fine too.
    – Travis
    Feb 8 '10 at 1:01
  • 16
    It keeps on surprising me how people name their variables. Sometimes I think they really want to make it unnecessarily complicated. Next to see will aaaaa.aaaa.push(...) :)
    – dazito
    Jan 25 '20 at 22:40
  • 4
    Downmodded for things.thing. This unnecessarily complicates both the question and the answer. Nov 24 '20 at 13:26

69 Answers 69

2

I believe a combination of reduce with JSON.stringify to perfectly compare Objects and selectively adding those who are not already in the accumulator is an elegant way.

Keep in mind that JSON.stringify might become a performance issue in extreme cases where the array has many Objects and they are complex, BUT for majority of the time, this is the shortest way to go IMHO.

var collection= [{a:1},{a:2},{a:1},{a:3}]

var filtered = collection.reduce((filtered, item) => {
  if( !filtered.some(filteredItem => JSON.stringify(filteredItem) == JSON.stringify(item)) )
    filtered.push(item)
  return filtered
}, [])

console.log(filtered)

Another way of writing the same (but less efficient):

collection.reduce((filtered, item) => 
  filtered.some(filteredItem => 
    JSON.stringify(filteredItem ) == JSON.stringify(item)) 
      ? filtered
      : [...filtered, item]
, [])
0
2
 npm i lodash

 let non_duplicated_data = _.uniqBy(pendingDeposits, v => [v.stellarAccount, v.externalTransactionId].join());
2

The problem can be simplified to removing duplicates from the thing array.

You can implement a faster O(n) solution (assuming native key lookup is negligible) by using an object to both maintain unique criteria as keys and storing associated values.

Basically, the idea is to store all objects by their unique key, so that duplicates overwrite themselves:

const thing = [{ place: "here", name:"stuff" }, { place: "there", name:"morestuff" }, { place: "there", name:"morestuff" } ]

const uniques = {}
for (const t of thing) {
  const key = t.place + '$' + t.name  // Or whatever string criteria you want, which can be generified as Object.keys(t).join("$")
  uniques[key] = t                    // Last duplicate wins
}
const uniqueThing = Object.values(uniques)
console.log(uniqueThing)

2

es6 magic in one line... readable at that!

// returns the union of two arrays where duplicate objects with the same 'prop' are removed
const removeDuplicatesWith = (a, b, prop) => {
  a.filter(x => !b.find(y => x[prop] === y[prop]));
};
1
  • this doesn't work in two ways. Not only did the two people that edited the original solution fundamentally change it by adding braces but not adding a return statement before the a.filter, the original function didnt work anyway since it ignores any items in the second array that are not in the first.
    – MarkC
    Feb 24 at 22:29
2
const objectsMap = new Map();
const placesName = [
  { place: "here", name: "stuff" },
  { place: "there", name: "morestuff" },
  { place: "there", name: "morestuff" },
];
placesName.forEach((object) => {
  objectsMap.set(object.place, object);
});
console.log(objectsMap);
1
  • Create Arrays of object: console.log([...objectsMap.values()]); Jul 14 at 9:28
2

Here I found a simple solution for removing duplicates from an array of objects using reduce method. I am filtering elements based on the position key of an object

const med = [
  {name: 'name1', position: 'left'},
  {name: 'name2', position: 'right'},
  {name: 'name3', position: 'left'},
  {name: 'name4', position: 'right'},
  {name: 'name5', position: 'left'},
  {name: 'name6', position: 'left1'}
]

const arr = [];
med.reduce((acc, curr) => {
  if(acc.indexOf(curr.position) === -1) {
    acc.push(curr.position);
    arr.push(curr);
  }
  return acc;
}, [])

console.log(arr)

1

If you don't mind your unique array being sorted afterwards, this would be an efficient solution:

things.thing
  .sort(((a, b) => a.place < b.place)
  .filter((current, index, array) =>
    index === 0 || current.place !== array[index - 1].place)

This way, you only have to compare the current element with the previous element in the array. Sorting once before filtering (O(n*log(n))) is cheaper than searching for a duplicate in the entire array for every array element (O(n²)).

1
1
str =[
{"item_id":1},
{"item_id":2},
{"item_id":2}
]

obj =[]
for (x in str){
    if(check(str[x].item_id)){
        obj.push(str[x])
    }   
}
function check(id){
    flag=0
    for (y in obj){
        if(obj[y].item_id === id){
            flag =1
        }
    }
    if(flag ==0) return true
    else return false

}
console.log(obj)

str is an array of objects. There exists objects having same value (here a small example, there are two objects having same item_id as 2). check(id) is a function that checks if any object having same item_id exists or not. if it exists return false otherwise return true. According to that result, push the object into a new array obj The output of the above code is [{"item_id":1},{"item_id":2}]

2
1

Have you heard of Lodash library? I recommend you this utility, when you don't really want to apply your logic to the code, and use already present code which is optimised and reliable.

Consider making an array like this

things.thing.push({place:"utopia",name:"unicorn"});
things.thing.push({place:"jade_palace",name:"po"});
things.thing.push({place:"jade_palace",name:"tigress"});
things.thing.push({place:"utopia",name:"flying_reindeer"});
things.thing.push({place:"panda_village",name:"po"});

Note that if you want to keep one attribute unique, you may very well do that by using lodash library. Here, you may use _.uniqBy

.uniqBy(array, [iteratee=.identity])

This method is like _.uniq (which returns a duplicate-free version of an array, in which only the first occurrence of each element is kept) except that it accepts iteratee which is invoked for each element in array to generate the criterion by which uniqueness is computed.

So, for example, if you want to return an array having unique attribute of 'place'

_.uniqBy(things.thing, 'place')

Similarly, if you want unique attribute as 'name'

_.uniqBy(things.thing, 'name')

Hope this helps.

Cheers!

1
const uniqueElements = (arr, fn) => arr.reduce((acc, v) => {
    if (!acc.some(x => fn(v, x))) { acc.push(v); }
    return acc;
}, []);

const stuff = [
    {place:"here",name:"stuff"},
    {place:"there",name:"morestuff"},
    {place:"there",name:"morestuff"},
];

const unique = uniqueElements(stuff, (a,b) => a.place === b.place && a.name === b.name );
//console.log( unique );

[{
    "place": "here",
    "name": "stuff"
  },
  {
    "place": "there",
    "name": "morestuff"
}]
1

You can convert the array objects into strings so they can be compared, add the strings to a Set so the comparable duplicates will be automatically removed and then convert each of the strings back into objects.

It might not be as performant as other answers, but it's readable.

const things = {};

things.thing = [];
things.thing.push({place:"here",name:"stuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});

const uniqueArray = (arr) => {

  const stringifiedArray = arr.map((item) => JSON.stringify(item));
  const set = new Set(stringifiedArray);

  return Array.from(set).map((item) => JSON.parse(item));
}

const uniqueThings = uniqueArray(things.thing);

console.log(uniqueThings);
1

Simple solution with ES6 'reduce' and 'find' array helper methods

Works efficiently and perfectly fine!

"use strict";

var things = new Object();
things.thing = new Array();
things.thing.push({
    place: "here",
    name: "stuff"
});
things.thing.push({
    place: "there",
    name: "morestuff"
});
things.thing.push({
    place: "there",
    name: "morestuff"
});

// the logic is here

function removeDup(something) {
    return something.thing.reduce(function (prev, ele) {
        var found = prev.find(function (fele) {
            return ele.place === fele.place && ele.name === fele.name;
        });
        if (!found) {
            prev.push(ele);
        }
        return prev;
    }, []);
}
console.log(removeDup(things));
0
1

For a readable and a simple solution searcher, her is my version:

    function removeDupplicationsFromArrayByProp(originalArray, prop) {
        let results = {};
        for(let i=0; i<originalArray.length;i++){
            results[originalArray[i][prop]] = originalArray[i];
        }
        return Object.values(results);
    }
1

My two cents here. If you know the properties are in the same order, you can stringify the elements and remove dupes from the array and parse the array again. Something like this:

var things = new Object();

things.thing = new Array();

things.thing.push({place:"here",name:"stuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});
  
let stringified = things.thing.map(i=>JSON.stringify(i));
let unique =  stringified.filter((k, idx)=> stringified.indexOf(k) === idx)
                         .map(j=> JSON.parse(j))
console.log(unique);

1
1

This solution worked best for me , by utilising Array.from Method, And also its shorter and readable.

let person = [
{name: "john"}, 
{name: "jane"}, 
{name: "imelda"}, 
{name: "john"},
{name: "jane"}
];

const data = Array.from(new Set(person.map(JSON.stringify))).map(JSON.parse);
console.log(data);
1
  • Removing Duplicates From Array Of Objects in react js (Working perfectly)

      let optionList = [];
          var dataArr = this.state.itemArray.map(item => {
              return [item.name, item]
          });
      var maparr = new Map(dataArr);
    
      var results = [...maparr.values()];
    
      if (results.length > 0) {
           results.map(data => {
           if (data.lead_owner !== null) {
                optionList.push({ label: data.name, value: 
                data.name });
           }
           return true;
         });
     }
     console.log(optionList)
    
1
1

Fast (less runtime) and type-safe answer for lazy Typescript developers:

export const uniqueBy = <T>( uniqueKey: keyof T, objects: T[]): T[] => {
  const ids = objects.map(object => object[uniqueKey]);
  return objects.filter((object, index) => !ids.includes(object[uniqueKey], index + 1));
} 
1
  • 1
    uniqueKey should be keyof T instead of string to make it more precise. Sep 14 at 13:45
0

Here is another technique to find number of duplicate and and remove it easily from you data object. "dupsCount" is number of duplicate files count. sort your data first then remove. it will gives you fastest duplication remove.

  dataArray.sort(function (a, b) {
            var textA = a.name.toUpperCase();
            var textB = b.name.toUpperCase();
            return (textA < textB) ? -1 : (textA > textB) ? 1 : 0;
        });
        for (var i = 0; i < dataArray.length - 1; ) {
            if (dataArray[i].name == dataArray[i + 1].name) {
                dupsCount++;
                dataArray.splice(i, 1);
            } else {
                i++;
            }
        }
0

Here is a solution using new filter function of JavaScript that is quite easy . Let's say you have an array like this.

var duplicatesArray = ['AKASH','AKASH','NAVIN','HARISH','NAVIN','HARISH','AKASH','MANJULIKA','AKASH','TAPASWENI','MANJULIKA','HARISH','TAPASWENI','AKASH','MANISH','HARISH','TAPASWENI','MANJULIKA','MANISH'];

The filter function will allow you to create a new array, using a callback function once for each element in the array. So you could set up the unique array like this.

var uniqueArray = duplicatesArray.filter(function(elem, pos) {return duplicatesArray.indexOf(elem) == pos;});

In this scenario your unique array will run through all of the values in the duplicate array. The elem variable represents the value of the element in the array (mike,james,james,alex), the position is it's 0-indexed position in the array (0,1,2,3...), and the duplicatesArray.indexOf(elem) value is just the index of the first occurrence of that element in the original array. So, because the element 'james' is duplicated, when we loop through all of the elements in the duplicatesArray and push them to the uniqueArray, the first time we hit james, our "pos" value is 1, and our indexOf(elem) is 1 as well, so James gets pushed to the uniqueArray. The second time we hit James, our "pos" value is 2, and our indexOf(elem) is still 1 (because it only finds the first instance of an array element), so the duplicate is not pushed. Therefore, our uniqueArray contains only unique values.

Here is the Demo of above function.Click Here for the above function example

1
  • 1
    this does not take into account Objects (part of question)
    – rob2d
    Mar 29 '18 at 18:25
0

If you need an unique array based on multiple properties in the object you can do this with map and combining the properties of the object.

    var hash = array.map(function(element){
        var string = ''
        for (var key in element){
            string += element[key]
        }
        return string
    })
    array = array.filter(function(element, index){
        var string = ''
        for (var key in element){
            string += element[key]
        }
        return hash.indexOf(string) == index
    })
0

Generic for any array of objects:

/**
* Remove duplicated values without losing information
*/
const removeValues = (items, key) => {
  let tmp = {};

  items.forEach(item => {
    tmp[item[key]] = (!tmp[item[key]]) ? item : Object.assign(tmp[item[key]], item);
  });
  items = [];
  Object.keys(tmp).forEach(key => items.push(tmp[key]));

  return items;
}

Hope it could help to anyone.

0

Another way would be to use reduce function and have a new array to be the accumulator. If there is already a thing with the same name in the accumulator array then don't add it there.

let list = things.thing;
list = list.reduce((accumulator, thing) => {
    if (!accumulator.filter((duplicate) => thing.name === duplicate.name)[0]) {
        accumulator.push(thing);
    }
    return accumulator;
}, []);
thing.things = list;

I'm adding this answer, because I couldn't find nice, readable es6 solution (I use babel to handle arrow functions) that's compatible with Internet Explorer 11. The problem is IE11 doesn't have Map.values() or Set.values() without polyfill. For the same reason I used filter()[0] to get first element instead of find().

2
  • where does rule come from?
    – mjwrazor
    Jun 29 '17 at 14:20
  • @mjwrazor sorry I meant thing to be there
    – Keammoort
    Jun 29 '17 at 16:06
0
 var testArray= ['a','b','c','d','e','b','c','d'];

 function removeDuplicatesFromArray(arr){

 var obj={};
 var uniqueArr=[];
 for(var i=0;i<arr.length;i++){ 
    if(!obj.hasOwnProperty(arr[i])){
        obj[arr[i]] = arr[i];
        uniqueArr.push(arr[i]);
    }
 }

return uniqueArr;

}
var newArr = removeDuplicatesFromArray(testArray);
console.log(newArr);

Output:- [ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e' ]
0

If you don't want to specify a list of properties:

function removeDuplicates(myArr) {
  var props = Object.keys(myArr[0])
  return myArr.filter((item, index, self) =>
    index === self.findIndex((t) => (
      props.every(prop => {
        return t[prop] === item[prop]
      })
    ))
  )
}

OBS! Not compatible with IE11.

0
  • This solution is generic for any kind of object and checks for every (key, value) of the Object in the array.
  • Using an temporary object as a hash table to see if the entire Object was ever present as a key.
  • If the string representation of the Object is found then that item is removed from the array.

var arrOfDup = [{'id':123, 'name':'name', 'desc':'some desc'},
                {'id':125, 'name':'another name', 'desc':'another desc'},
                {'id':123, 'name':'name', 'desc':'some desc'},
                {'id':125, 'name':'another name', 'desc':'another desc'},
                {'id':125, 'name':'another name', 'desc':'another desc'}];

function removeDupes(dupeArray){
  let temp = {};
  let tempArray = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(dupeArray));
  dupeArray.forEach((item, pos) => {
    if(temp[JSON.stringify(item)]){
      tempArray.pop();
    }else{
      temp[JSON.stringify(item)] = item;
    }
  });
 return tempArray;
}

arrOfDup = removeDupes(arrOfDup);

arrOfDup.forEach((item, pos) => {
  console.log(`item in array at position ${pos} is ${JSON.stringify(item)}`);
});

0

here is my solution, it searches for duplicates based on object.prop and when it finds a duplicate object it replaces its value in array1 with array2 value

function mergeSecondArrayIntoFirstArrayByProperty(array1, array2) {
    for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
        var found = false;
        for (var j = 0; j < array1.length; j++) {
            if (array2[i].prop === array1[j].prop) { // if item exist in array1
                array1[j] = array2[i]; // replace it in array1 with array2 value
                found = true;
            }
        }
        if (!found) // if item in array2 not found in array1, add it to array1
            array1.push(array2[i]);

    }
    return array1;
}
0

What about this:

function dedupe(arr, compFn){
    let res = [];
    if (!compFn) compFn = (a, b) => { return a === b };
    arr.map(a => {if(!res.find(b => compFn(a, b))) res.push(a)});
    return res;
}
0

If you find yourself needing to remove duplicate objects from arrays based on particular fields frequently, it might be worth creating a distinct(array, predicate) function that you can import from anywhere in your project. This would look like

const things = [{place:"here",name:"stuff"}, ...];
const distinctThings = distinct(things, thing => thing.place);

The distinct function can use any of the implementations given in the many good answers above. The easiest one uses findIndex:

const distinct = (items, predicate) => items.filter((uniqueItem, index) =>
    items.findIndex(item =>
        predicate(item) === predicate(uniqueItem)) === index);
0

You can use Object.values() combined with Array.prototype.reduce():

const things = new Object();

things.thing = new Array();

things.thing.push({place:"here",name:"stuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});
things.thing.push({place:"there",name:"morestuff"});

const result = Object.values(things.thing.reduce((a, c) => (a[`${c.place}${c.name}`] = c, a), {})); 

console.log(result);
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

0

Make Something simple. Fancy is good but unreadable code is useless. Enjoy :-)

var a = [
	{
		executiveId: 6873702,
		largePhotoCircle: null,
		name: "John A. Cuomo",
		photoURL: null,
		primaryCompany: "VSE CORP",
		primaryTitle: "Chief Executive Officer, President and Director"
	},
	{
		executiveId: 6873702,
		largePhotoCircle: null,
		name: "John A. Cuomo",
		photoURL: null,
		primaryCompany: "VSE CORP",
		primaryTitle: "Chief Executive Officer, President and Director"
	},
	{
		executiveId: 6873703,
		largePhotoCircle: null,
		name: "John A. Cuomo",
		photoURL: null,
		primaryCompany: "VSE CORP",
		primaryTitle: "Chief Executive Officer, President and Director",
	}
];

function filterDuplicate(myArr, prop) {
      // Format - (1)

      // return myArr.filter((obj, pos, arr) => {
      //     return arr.map(mapObj => mapObj[prop]).indexOf(obj[prop]) === pos;
      // });

      // Format - (2)
      var res = {};
      var resArr = [];
      for (var elem of myArr) {
        res[elem.executiveId] = elem;
      }
      for (let [index, elem] of Object.entries(res)) {
        resArr.push(elem);
      }
      return resArr;
  }
  
let finalRes = filterDuplicate(a,"executiveId");
console.log("finalResults : ",finalRes);

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