6
  7 foreach (@crons) {
  8     unless (index($_, "cks") != -1) {
  9         unless (index($_, "aab") != -1) {
 10             unless (index($_, "lam") != -1) {
 11                 push (@found, $_);
 12             }
 13         }
 14     }
 15 }

how come the above does not give the same output as the following:

  7 foreach (@crons) {
  8     unless (index($_, "cks") != -1 && index($_, "aab") != -1 && index($_, "lam") != -1) {
  9         push (@found, $_);
 10     }
 11 }

@crons has the list of strings and I am trying to get all string that does not have "cks", "aab" and "lam"

The first section of code does what i want but the second doesnt and in my mind, it should...
Can anyone care to explain why they are not the same nor why it does not give the same output?

  • 4
    foreach ( @crons ) { push @found, $_ if ! /cks/ && ! /aab/ && ! /lam/; } is far more legible. – Zaid Mar 5 '14 at 16:15
  • 2
    Or alternatively (thanks to de Morgan's law) : for ( @crons ) { push @found, $_ unless /cks/ or /aab/ or /lam/; } – Zaid Mar 5 '14 at 16:29
11

Let's call your conditions A, B, C. We now have the code

unless (A) {
  unless (B) {
    unless (C) {

The unless can be very confusing, so we write it only using if:

if (!A) {
  if (!B) {
    if (!C) {

Now we && those conditions together:

if (!A && !B && !C) {

This could also be written as

if (not(A || B || C)) {

This equivalence is called de Morgan's law

  • 3
    Beautifully explained. ( !A && !B && !C ) != !( A && B && C ) – Zaid Mar 5 '14 at 16:18
  • 4
    ...and thus, it could be written unless (A || B || C) {. But don't you dare. – ikegami Mar 5 '14 at 16:29
  • @ikegami Is that considered bad practice ? – Hunter McMillen Mar 5 '14 at 16:37
  • @HunterMcMillen YES. unless tends to be terribly confusing for anything else than return unless defined $foo. Fortunately perlcritic tends to react rather allergic on unless. While writing my answer, I had considerable difficulty following the if (not(A || B || C)) with the conditions from the question, and just decided to trust the math instead. – amon Mar 5 '14 at 16:40
  • I disagree with the anti-unless crowd in this case. I read Perl as English a lot of the time and for me, unless a or b or c is easier to follow/parse than if not a or b or c. – Ashley Mar 5 '14 at 18:36
1

The non-equivalence of the two logics become clear when you test the string 'cks'.

The first logic would evaluate to false, the second would evaluate to true, since it does not contain the string 'aab' or 'lam'.

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