1

Got this example from my book:

public class ForEach3 {
public static void main(String args[]){
    int sum=0;
    int numbers [][]=new int[3][5];

    for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<5;j++)
        {
            numbers[i][j]=(i+1)*(j+1);
        }
    }


    for(int x[]:numbers)
    {
        for(int y:x)
        {
            System.out.println("Number is: "+y);
            sum+=y;
        }
    }
}
}

I understand everything until it comes to this loop:

or(int x[]:numbers)
    {
        for(int y:x)

Why we had to make this loop ? : for(int y:x) Thats the part which confuse me a lot, i know how to do basic for each loop with basic array, but this confuse me a lot when i use two dimensional array..

  • 1
    uncommon syntax for for(int[] x : numbers) if that helps you understand – zapl Mar 5 '14 at 23:50
  • Still dont understand it, sorry.. – user3266796 Mar 5 '14 at 23:51
6

Ok, so consider this code:

for(int x[] : numbers) {
    for(int y : x) {
        System.out.println("Number is: " + y);
    }
}

Now, on the first line, you see some odd syntax. The int x[] is saying the same things as int[] x. (All it is, is a different way of saying the same thing.) Basically, you're declaring an array. Now the foreach loop takes each element in the array you specify after the :, or numbers, and places it into the variable you declared before the :, or x.

Now, the best way to understand this code is to understand how 2D arrays work. They aren't some new special thing, all a 2D array is, is an array of arrays. Instead of each element being a value, like in a traditional array, each element is a whole other array, with it's own set of values. So let's look at the top line of code again.

for(int x[] : numbers) {

This, in english, translates to, "For each of the elements in numbers, place it's value in x and run the code below." Remember that because numbers is an array of arrays, each of it's elements is an array. So the code runs through the first iteration, and retrieves the first element in numbers (at index 0), which is an array of ints. Then, it runs the code below:

for(int y : x) {
    System.out.println("Number is: " + y);
}

The top line of code can be translated to english as follows: "For each of the elements in x, place it's value in y and run the code below." So, it does just that. The code runs through the first iteration and retrieves the first element in x, which is an int. Then, it runs the code:

System.out.println("Number is: " + y);

Of course, that prints out the value it retrieved. Then, the inner for loop keeps going through the array x until it has reached the end. At this point, just like any other for loop, it exits.

Now, remember that you are still only on the first iteration of the for(int x[] : numbers) loop. So now that all the code inside has run, it retrieves the next element in numbers, or the next array. (Because numbers is an array of arrays) It runs the code below again, repeating until it has run the code for every element (or array) in numbers.

Hope that helps. Feel free to ask me questions in the comments.

Edit:

For your questions in the comments, let's look at this graphically.

Graphic Representation of 2D Array

So the orange box here is numbers. It is an array. Each of it's elements in one of the blue boxes. (For a total of 3). Now, look at the top blue box. It is an array. The top blue box is numbers[0], or, (during the first iteration of the outer loop) x. Now look at the inside of the top blue box, at the green boxes. Each of the blue box's elements is represented by a green box. Each green box is an int. The first green box in the first blue box is (during the first iteration of the outer loop), x[0], or (during the first iteration of both the outer and inner loops), y. So the outer loop is looping through all of the blue boxes (x) in the orange box (numbers), and the inner loop is looping through all the green boxes (y) in the blue box (x) that it was given.

Does that make more sense?

|improve this answer|||||
  • Yes, totally understand it but. i wonder why this first for(int y:x) couldnt run this println? Why it had to pass his value to variable y ? Because they have the same value.As you said: "For each of the elements in x, place it's value in y and run the code below. This is the part i dont understand why it had to pass the value to y ? – user3266796 Mar 6 '14 at 0:12
  • Because x is an array of ints. You need to iterate over each value of x. In this case, you are setting y equal to each value. This is the same as setting x equal to each int[] in the int[][] called numbers. – nrubin29 Mar 6 '14 at 0:15
  • @miljannet See my edit with the graphic for details. – Andrew Gies Mar 6 '14 at 0:28
  • Thank you Andrew ! Got it now, thank you a lot guys. – user3266796 Mar 6 '14 at 8:50
6

First, we are going to rename numbers to grid, x to row, and y to cell. Let's break it down.

for (int x[]:numbers) can be rewritten as for (int[] row : grid). This iterates over all int[]s stored in grid. For each int[], row is set to that int[].

The inner loop, for (int y : x), rewritten as for (int cell : row) is iterating over all of the values of row, which is an int[], and setting cell equal to each value. The first time the outer then inner loops run, row is equal to grid[0] and cell is equal to row[0], or grid[0][0]. This continues until every value in grid has been used.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Got it now why it is better to use int[] x, but still dont get it what is this for(int y:x) loop doing ? I understnad that x inherits the numbers from array numbers.But why this int y needs to inherits numbers from variable x ? y is same as x everytime ? – user3266796 Mar 6 '14 at 0:00
1

A 2-dimensional array is actually an array of (1-dimensional) arrays. Each row or column (depending on how you think of your 2D array) in an int[][] is a int[] and each item in there is a simple int.

With some (hopefully) less confusing names, your code becomes

int[][] grid = new int[5][5];

for (int[] row : grid)
{
    for(int cell : row)
    {
        System.out.println(cell);
    }
}

So the outer loop iterates over rows while the inner loop iterates over the elements inside those rows (and it's a different row each time) until the loop has visited every cell in the grid once.

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  • 1
    The renaming of variables is very helpful. – nrubin29 Mar 6 '14 at 0:05
1

The first loop describes the index of the first array (length == 3), in which again there are arrays with length == 5. The second loop is to walk through your numbers array and print out every single value in a new line.

So it goes from [0][0...4] to [1][0...4] and last [2][0...4] and prints out every value.

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  • The shorter version of the loop, called an enhanced for loop, allows for iteration over an array or collection without maintaining a counter variable. It's called syntactical sugar; it's a quicker way to do something. Suit yourself ;) – nrubin29 Mar 5 '14 at 23:56
  • 1
    Actually, I do like the enhanced for loop because it is less error prone (less code overall) and easier to read. – zapl Mar 6 '14 at 0:02
  • @nrubin29 Hi both, am I wrong when guessing that the enhanced for loop only can increment +1 ? Or would it then look like this when incrementing +3: for(int cell : row+3) {} Thx! – N30 Mar 6 '14 at 0:12
  • row is an int[], therefore you cannot add 3 to row. If you want to iterate over every third element, you'd use a standard for loop that increments the counter by 3. – nrubin29 Mar 6 '14 at 0:13
0
for(int x[]:numbers)

Here you iterate over numbers[0], numbers[1], numbers[2], and the value of numbers[i] is put into the variable x. Then x is a one-dimensional array you iterate over in:

for(int y:x)
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0

Here's the key point: There's actually no such thing as a "two-dimensional array". Just as an int[] is an array of int, an int[][] is an array of int[]. When you say myArray[1][2], it's not really going into coordinate (1, 2) of a grid. myArray is an array of arrays, so myArray[1] gives you an array, which is indexed by [2].

Or, to rewrite the first part of your example:

int numbers[][] = new int[3][5];
for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
    int[] array = numbers[i];
    for(int j=0;j<5;j++)
    {
        array[j]=(i+1)*(j+1);
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • I wouldn't say that there's "no such thing" as a 2D array. Oracle seems to think there is. – nrubin29 Mar 6 '14 at 0:16
  • There is such a thing as a 2D array, just not in Java. The best Java can do is a 1D array of references to further arrays. It's not the same, because they could be anywhere on the heap. This means that if you want performance, you sometimes have to use a single 1D array and compute the indices yourself. – Trejkaz Dec 30 '14 at 0:23

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