23

I am trying to return a specific node in a JSON object structure which looks like this

{
    "id":"0",
    "children":[
        {
            "id":"1",
            "children":[...]
        },
        {
            "id":"2",
            "children":[...]
        }
    ]
}

So it's a tree-like child-parent relation. Every node has a unique ID. I'm trying to find a specific node like this

function findNode(id, currentNode) {

    if (id == currentNode.id) {
        return currentNode;
    } else {
        currentNode.children.forEach(function (currentChild) {            
            findNode(id, currentChild);
        });
    }
}  

I execute the search for example by findNode("10", rootNode). But even though the search finds a match the function always returns undefined. I have a bad feeling that the recursive function doesn't stop after finding the match and continues running an finally returns undefined because in the latter recursive executions it doesn't reach a return point, but I'm not sure how to fix this.

Please help!

  • 1
    since it is answer, I just want to point out that foreach loop can't stop in javascript. do not use foreach in algorithm. – wayne Mar 6 '14 at 11:21
  • Why are you performing a search on a JSON object in the first place? You should maybe consider doing the search in the place where the JSON object was generated, hopefully the database. – abbaf33f Mar 5 '18 at 14:54
  • 5
    @jmb.mage because in the real world you often have to solve tasks which don't have ideal circumstances and whose details are out of your reach. This is one of them. – Dropout Mar 5 '18 at 15:41
41

When searching recursively, you have to pass the result back by returning it. You're not returning the result of findNode(id, currentChild), though.

function findNode(id, currentNode) {
    var i,
        currentChild,
        result;

    if (id == currentNode.id) {
        return currentNode;
    } else {

        // Use a for loop instead of forEach to avoid nested functions
        // Otherwise "return" will not work properly
        for (i = 0; i < currentNode.children.length; i += 1) {
            currentChild = currentNode.children[i];

            // Search in the current child
            result = findNode(id, currentChild);

            // Return the result if the node has been found
            if (result !== false) {
                return result;
            }
        }

        // The node has not been found and we have no more options
        return false;
    }
}
  • 1
    Thanks! Works perfect. – Dropout Mar 6 '14 at 11:27
  • 6
    I had to add an additional check to the for loop (i.e., for (i = 0; currentNode.children !== undefined && i < currentNode.children.length; i += 1)) to avoid the error "TypeError: Cannot read property 'length' of undefined" at leaf nodes where "children" do not exist. – Denis Weerasiri Oct 19 '15 at 6:29
  • 1
    breaks with can't find length of undefined. it's a document object. – amitava mozumder Nov 22 '18 at 10:01
4
function findNode(id, currentNode) {

    if (id == currentNode.id) {
        return currentNode;
    } else {
        var result;
        currentNode.children.forEach(function(node){
            if(node.id == id){
                result = node;
                return;
            }
        });
        return (result ? result : "No Node Found");
    }
}
console.log(findNode("10", node));

This method will return the node if it present in the node list. But this will loop through all the child of a node since we can't successfully break the forEach flow. A better implementation would look like below.

function findNode(id, currentNode) {

    if (id == currentNode.id) {
        return currentNode;
    } else {
        for(var index in currentNode.children){
            var node = currentNode.children[index];
            if(node.id == id)
                return node;
            findNode(id, node);
        }
        return "No Node Present";
    }
}
console.log(findNode("1", node));
  • Dear @Triode, You define result but never use it. – Mehrdad88sh Jun 2 at 11:33
  • 1
    @Mehr88sh Sorry, Rectified!! – Triode Jun 6 at 9:56
3

I use the following

var searchObject = function (object, matchCallback, currentPath, result, searched) {
    currentPath = currentPath || '';
    result = result || [];
    searched = searched || [];
    if (searched.indexOf(object) !== -1 && object === Object(object)) {
        return;
    }
    searched.push(object);
    if (matchCallback(object)) {
        result.push({path: currentPath, value: object});
    }
    try {
        if (object === Object(object)) {
            for (var property in object) {
                if (property.indexOf("$") !== 0) {
                    //if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(object, property)) {
                        searchObject(object[property], matchCallback, currentPath + "." + property, result, searched);
                    //}
                }
            }
        }
    }
    catch (e) {
        console.log(object);
        throw e;
    }
    return result;
}

Then you can write

searchObject(rootNode, function (value) { return value != null && value != undefined && value.id == '10'; });

Now this works on circular references and you can match on any field or combination of fields you like by changing the matchCallback function.

  • the match callback is a great idea and I also like that you get the path as well as the object. Cheers! – frumbert Jul 4 '18 at 3:43
  • @frumbert updated the code with some bug fixes! – Peter Jul 4 '18 at 7:50
  • It works, thank you. You should mention that in order to search for a specific node you should change this part: if (property.indexOf("NameOfTheNodeYouAreLookingFor") !== 0) {} And also to change to return object; instead of return result; – atfede Apr 17 at 13:44
  • @atfede the reason i return result is to allow for more then one hit. I'm a bit unsure what you mean with if (property.indexOf("NameOfTheNodeYouAreLookingFor") !== 0) {} – Peter Apr 17 at 14:02
0

I really liked a tree search! A tree is an extremely common data structure for most of today's complex structured tasks. So I just had similar task for lunch too. I even did some deep research, but havent actually found anything new! So what I've got for you today, is "How I implemented that in modern JS syntax":

// helper
find_subid = (id, childArray) => {
    for( child of childArray ) {
        foundChild = find_id( i, child ); // not sub_id, but do a check (root/full search)!
        if( foundChild ) // 200 
            return foundChild;
    }
    return null; // 404
}

// actual search method
find_id = (id, parent) => (id == parent.id) : parent : find_subid(id, parent.childArray);
0

I would try not to reinvent the wheel. We use object-scan for all our data processing needs. It's conceptually very simple, but allows for a lot of cool stuff. Here is how you would solve your specific question

Data Definition

const data = {
  "id": "0",
  "children": [{
      "id": "1",
      "children": [{
          "id": "3",
          "children": []
        },
        {
          "id": "4",
          "children": []
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "id": "2",
      "children": [{
          "id": "5",
          "children": []
        },
        {
          "id": "6",
          "children": []
        }
      ]
    }
  ]
};

Logic

const findNode = (id, input) => {
  let obj = null;
  objectScan(['**.id'], {
    filterFn: (key, value, { parents }) => {
      if (value === id) {
        obj = parents[0];
      }
    },
    breakFn: () => obj !== null
  })(data);
  return obj;
};

const result = findNode('6', data);

Output

// result =>
{
  "id": "6",
  "children": []
}

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