50

I need to be able to call a function in order to run code to dynamically retrieve the source of an image. The following code snippet shows an example of what I want:

<!-- "myFunction" exists in the current scope -->
<img ng-src="myFunction()" />

I'm sure this has to be simple but I just can't find anything in the ng-src documentation! Anyone else ever hit this?

Thanks in advance!

The Directive (Example based on answers)

Others recommended a directive. I can't post client code so I wrote a short example of what that would could look like in plunker (see here). The core directive itself is:

app.directive("imageSource", function (){
  return { link: function (scope, element, attrs){
      element.attr("src", scope.imageUrlArray[attrs.imageSource]);
    }
  };
});

I know that what I have here as an example could probably just be done with the ng-repeat using the variable in an ng-src but it serves as an example of what a directive would look like if one were necessary.

6
  • If you want to call a function like this you should really write a new Directive
    – Liam
    Mar 6, 2014 at 13:15
  • @Liam I've written many directives before. Any particular reason this is a case for a directive vs just calling the function to get the url directly?
    – drew_w
    Mar 6, 2014 at 13:16
  • 1
    ng-src is a directive, right. Your calling a directive to call a function. Why? Why not simply write a custom directive that returns what myfunction does. It'd be a whole lot neater.
    – Liam
    Mar 6, 2014 at 13:18
  • @Liam Got it! I'll definitely consider doing that. Thanks for the pointer!
    – drew_w
    Mar 6, 2014 at 13:18
  • 1
    @Liam Noted! Strictly speaking I figured that wasn't an answer to my original question but was sort of just a useful "side bar". In the future though - I'll post as an answer instead!
    – drew_w
    Mar 6, 2014 at 14:20

3 Answers 3

92
<img ng-src="{{myFunction()}}" />

Fiddle

6
  • Thanks for the answer! I should have guessed at this but since this isn't my normal pattern, I hadn't tried this before.
    – drew_w
    Mar 6, 2014 at 13:24
  • I would like to see a better solution using custom directive as @Liam suggested. Mar 6, 2014 at 13:30
  • I'll write that fast in JSFiddle and will amend my question to include that for those who have the same sort of issue in the future. Watch for that soon (if you care)!
    – drew_w
    Mar 6, 2014 at 13:34
  • 5
    I have tested this method and found out that it is not suitable for calling $http service or any other function because, angularjs continues to run the function as a loop Apr 12, 2015 at 14:45
  • 2
    Yes the answer is correct, but It loops way too many times. (if under a ng- repeat ) This is not advisable. Jun 15, 2015 at 13:08
5

Right, got there in the end:

JavaScript:

 angular.module('MyApp', [])
    .controller('Ctrl2', function($scope) {
    })
    .directive('mySrc', function() {
        return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function ( scope, elem, attrs ) {
             //replace test with whatever myFunction() does
             elem.attr('src', 'test1');
        }
      };
    });

HTML:

<div ng-app="MyApp">
  <div ng-controller="Ctrl2">
      <img my-src />
  </div>
</div>

Fiddle

2
  • 1
    What about passing myFunction as an argument to the directive?
    – Dan Tang
    Mar 6, 2014 at 15:48
  • do this method maintain angular's double data binding?
    – Typo
    Dec 9, 2017 at 1:51
0

Wouldn't it be better to pass myFunction as an argument to the custom directive? That way, we decouple the two, and can easily change which function to pass in in the future.

HTML

<body ng-app='testApp'>
    <div ng-controller='TestCtrl'>
        <img my-src callback='myFunction()' />
    </div>
</body>

JS:

angular.module('testApp', [])
.controller('TestCtrl', function($scope) {
    $scope.myFunction = function() {
        return 'http://nodejs.org/images/roadshow-promo.png';
    }
})
.directive('mySrc', function() {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        scope: {
            callback: '&'
        },
        link: function ( scope, elem, attrs ) {
            elem.attr('src', scope.callback());
        }
    };
})

http://jsfiddle.net/GLS2a/

2
  • 1
    But by doing this your effectively putting the logic (myFunction) into the view, when the logic should exist in the controller (separation of concerns). I also don't see how this is better than the solution CodeHater provided. It's the same thing, but wrapped in a slightly different way
    – Liam
    Mar 6, 2014 at 15:54
  • 1
    How is your directive different to ng-src?
    – JoeG
    Mar 6, 2014 at 15:54

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