6
String.format("%1s","").equals("")); // --> return false !
String.format("%1s","").equals(" ")); // --> return true !
  • Why is this happening ?
  • Where does the space come from ?
2
  • Have you had a look through the docs of String.format? This behavior is exactly as specified. Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 16:59
  • 1
    I actually got confused with %1$s specifier, it's indeed as specified.
    – C4stor
    Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

13

The space is specified by the minimum width value 1 in the format specifier

String.format("%1s","").equals(" ")
                ^
4
  • Whao. And here I thought it was related to the order of the args passed after. Thanks
    – C4stor
    Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 17:00
  • +1. Specifically, the 1 is a width, i.e. (from the Javadoc) "the minimum number of characters to be written to the output".
    – ruakh
    Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 17:00
  • 1
    @C4stor: You're thinking of %1$s. The dollar sign is required after an argument index.
    – ruakh
    Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 17:01
  • @C4stor Right - in many cases the number following the percent sign is indicating the argument index, but only if that index is followed by a dollar sign: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/…
    – Craig Otis
    Commented Mar 6, 2014 at 17:01
3

You wanted to add an argument index like this

String.format("%1$s", ""); //returns ""
String.format("%2$s %1$s", "a", "b"); //returns "b a"

Your code defined a "width"

String.format("%3s", ""); // returns "   ";
String.format("%3s", "a"); // returns "  a";
String.format("%-3s", "a"); // returns "a  ";

Read this for more info: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Formatter.html#syntax

1

Here %1s is a format specifier which doesn't have any arguments. The general syntax for no argument format specifier is as follows

%[flags][width]conversion

where

The optional flags is a set of characters that modify the output format. The set of valid flags depends on the conversion.

and

The optional width is a non-negative decimal integer indicating the minimum number of characters to be written to the output.

So, 1 specifies the width and here is the description behind why you get " " and not ""

The width is the minimum number of characters to be written to the output. If the length of the converted value is less than the width then the output will be padded by ' ' (\u0020') until the total number of characters equals the width. The padding is on the left by default. If the '-' flag is given, then the padding will be on the right. If the width is not specified then there is no minimum.

PS: \u0020 is Unicode character for Space.

Hope this helps.

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