23

This code:

import Data.Char (digitToInt)

myInt :: String -> Int
myInt [] = error "bad input: empty string"
myInt (x:xs)
  | x == '-'  = -1 * myInt xs
  | otherwise = foldl convert 0 (x:xs)
  where convert acc x
        | x `elem` ['0'..'9'] = 10 * acc + digitToInt x
        | otherwise           = error ("bad input: not an int - " ++ [x])

Fails:

Prelude> :l safeListFs.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main ( safeListFs.hs, interpreted )

safeListFs.hs:9:8: parse error (possibly incorrect indentation)
Failed, modules loaded: none.

But this version:

import Data.Char (digitToInt)

myInt :: String -> Int
myInt [] = error "bad input: empty string"
myInt (x:xs)
  | x == '-'  = -1 * myInt xs
  | otherwise = foldl convert 0 (x:xs)
  where convert acc x
          | x `elem` ['0'..'9'] = 10 * acc + digitToInt x
          | otherwise           = error ("bad input: not an int - " ++ [x])

is ok:

Prelude> :l safeListFs.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main ( safeListFs.hs, interpreted )
Ok, modules loaded: Main.

I can't figure out why those two last indents matter.

4
  • 9
    This question is a good example of why I hate Haskell's whitespace syntax; it always feels unintuitive to me compared to, say, Python. Unfortunately, the only thing I dislike more is ugly curly brackets littering my code. Feb 8, 2010 at 18:00
  • 11
    book.realworldhaskell.org/read/… The offside rule seems intuitive to me. You just have to stop thinking about blocks (like Python, which doesn't make sense in Haskell) and think instead about continuations of a declaration or expression.
    – ephemient
    Feb 8, 2010 at 18:45
  • 2
    Use a clever text editor and forget about weird identation rules. Feb 9, 2010 at 0:45
  • 1
    I use vim. With haskell indentation. Still, it didn't help in this case.
    – artemave
    Feb 10, 2010 at 11:19

3 Answers 3

33

Basically, Haskell notes the column where the first non-space character after where appears (in this case, the c of convert) and treats following lines beginning in that column as new definitions inside the where.

A line that continues the definition of the previous line (such as your | guards) must be indented to the right of the first non-space character (c in your code).

A line indented to the left of c would be outside the where (for example, the start of your next top-level function).

It's the column of the first character following where that is crucial, even if it's on a new line:

  where
    convert acc x
      | ...
    anotherFunction x y

    ^ 
1
  • ++ Wonderful, I couldn't jump on board of the other answers, this is much like what @arternave suggested recently in a comment, I think this explains the issue. Feb 10, 2010 at 17:01
13

A nested context must be further indented than the enclosing context (n>m). If not, L fails, and the compiler should indicate a layout error.

From http://www.haskell.org/onlinereport/syntax-iso.html.

This would also fail:

import Data.Char (digitToInt)

myInt :: String -> Int
myInt [] = error "bad input: empty string"
myInt (x:xs)
| x == '-'  = -1 * myInt xs
| otherwise = foldl convert 0 (x:xs)
where convert acc x
        | x `elem` ['0'..'9'] = 10 * acc + digitToInt x
        | otherwise           = error ("bad input: not an int - " ++ [x])

Uh, I'm bad at explaining things. There's a new context after where keyword, because you can specify more than one function in there -- remember that your program begins with implicit module Main where, so I think it's logical to require function body to be indented, just like on the module level (compiler expects another identifier on columns M and N, and declaration bodies to be further indented).

fun = ...
^ where fun' = ...
M       ^
        N
        fun'' = ...
fun2 = ...
3
  • Although your answers is obviously correct, it doesn't target my particular confusion. Which was based on the assumption that nested scope indentation would start from 'where'. Whereas it actually starts from function name.
    – artemave
    Feb 8, 2010 at 18:36
  • I still don't understand this: speak to why the OP's example that works, works, and why the example that doesn't work, doesn't. Feb 8, 2010 at 22:46
  • I'm still not sure I understand this: the function is under the module scope with 0 indents, but the where is under the module scope with 1 indent? Feb 9, 2010 at 6:37
6

Because you should always indent function definitions. (In your case, all things started at same column in where are considered "same-level" definition).

3
  • Offtopic: I have a friend whose name is Andrei Poluektov
    – artemave
    Feb 8, 2010 at 18:31
  • I still don't understand this answer, it seems in both examples where is right under the pipe ('|') and indented the same Feb 8, 2010 at 22:23
  • @Evan, 'where' is properly indented in both cases. It is pipes after 'where' which produce the the error. Because they aren't properly indented against 'convert' (in the first example)
    – artemave
    Feb 10, 2010 at 11:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.