They appear to give the same result to me:

In [32]: s
Out[32]: '\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x15\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00'

In [27]: np.frombuffer(s, dtype="int8")
Out[27]:
array([ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0, 21,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0], dtype=int8)

In [28]: np.fromstring(s, dtype="int8")
Out[28]:
array([ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0, 21,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0], dtype=int8)

In [33]: b = buffer(s)

In [34]: b
Out[34]: <read-only buffer for 0x035F8020, size -1, offset 0 at 0x036F13A0>

In [35]: np.fromstring(b, dtype="int8")
Out[35]:
array([ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0, 21,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0], dtype=int8)

In [36]: np.frombuffer(b, dtype="int8")
Out[36]:
array([ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0, 21,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,
    0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0], dtype=int8)

When should one be used vs. the other?

  • Have you read the documentation? frombuffer creates a 1d array from a buffer-object and fromstring creates a 1d array from a binary or string representation. – msvalkon Mar 6 '14 at 21:52
  • Please edit in what s is. – msvalkon Mar 6 '14 at 21:53
  • Whether s is a string of bytes or a buffer doesn't matter in my simple example. – user202987 Mar 6 '14 at 22:00
up vote 17 down vote accepted

From a practical standpoint, the difference is that:

x = np.fromstring(s, dtype='int8')

Will make a copy of the string in memory, while:

x = np.frombuffer(s, dtype='int8')

or

x = np.frombuffer(buffer(s), dtype='int8')

Will use the memory buffer of the string directly and won't use any* additional memory. Using frombuffer will also result in a read-only array if the input to buffer is a string, as strings are immutable in python.

(*Neglecting a few bytes of memory used for an additional python ndarray object -- The underlying memory for the data will be shared.)


If you're not familiar with buffer objects (memoryview in python3.x), they're essentially a way for C-level libraries to expose a block of memory for use in python. It's basically a python interface for managed access to raw memory.

If you were working with something that exposed the buffer interface, then you'd probably want to use frombuffer. (Python 2.x strings and python 3.x bytes expose the buffer interface, but you'll get a read-only array, as python strings are immutable.)

Otherwise, use fromstring to create a numpy array from a string. (Unless you know what you're doing, and want to tightly control memory use, etc.)

  • Thanks for the background info on buffer objects. – user202987 Mar 6 '14 at 22:52
  • @joe-kington Are you sure that np.frombuffer() doesn't make a copy of the buffer? If I run buffer(np.frombuffer(buffer(s), dtype='int8')) repeatedly, I get a new buffer location each time, and it's always different from buffer(s). – Matthias Fripp Aug 4 '16 at 21:17
  • @mfripp - You're getting new objects (e.g. a new ndarray each time), but they reference the same memory. If you'd like to verify this, try using something that's mutable (e.g. an array.array) instead of a string and modify the contents. You'll see all of the numpy views and the buffers change. – Joe Kington Aug 10 '16 at 21:21
  • @JoeKington, thanks. I experimented a little using multiprocessing.Array as the buffer and found they used the same memory. The string representation of the buffer object seems to be misleading; maybe it shows the location of the variable rather than the underlying buffer. A better way to check seems to be id(buffer[0]). – Matthias Fripp Aug 11 '16 at 0:43

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