6

I'm struggling to instantiate a class, within another class. My main concern is... Where do I place the constructor? In the header file? In the class file? Or in both? Nothing seems to work right. I'll try to put this as simple as possible. Let me know if it's too simple ;) This is how I would THINK it should be:

GameWorld.h:

#include "GameObject.h"

class GameWorld
{
protected:
    GameObject gameobject;
}

GameWorld.cpp:

#include "GameWorld.h"

void GameWorld::GameWorld()
{
    GameObject gameObject(constrctor parameters);
}

//When I compile the program, the values in the gameObject, are not set to anything.

So that's one of the things I've tried. Putting the constructor in the header, won't work either, for obvious reasons; I can't give it any parameters from GameWorld.

What is the correct way to do this?

Edit: Oops. Removed something useless.

1
  • You declare the class in the header. And in there, you declare the constructor, destructor, etc. Then in the cpp file, you define the constructor. Here you can make an initialization list to initialize all the member variables in the class. You can also take an argument list in the explicit constructor and set those inputs to whatever you want. Mar 7, 2014 at 0:03

2 Answers 2

10

You need to initialize the GameObject member in the containing class' initializer list.

// In the GameWorld.h header..
class GameWorld
{
public:
    GameWorld(); // Declare your default constructor.

protected:
    GameObject gameobject; // No () here.
}

// In the GameWorld.cpp implementation file.
GameWorld::GameWorld() // No 'void' return type here.
  : gameObject(ctorParams) // Initializer list. Constructing gameObject with args
{
}
6
  • But the constructor is already in the cpp file? Can't have two constructors :/ So I add that to the contrustor in the cpp file instead? Edit: Ah yes, this works! But how would this work with creating new objects on the fly? Dang I really need to figure out how to make my vector<GameObject> work. I guess that should be in another question? :P
    – Frederik
    Mar 7, 2014 at 0:16
  • 1
    The constructor needs to be declared in the class declaration. It then needs a definition stating what it actually does.
    – Aesthete
    Mar 7, 2014 at 0:19
  • 1
    That's what dynamic allocation is for. Have a look into pointers, new, and STL constructs like vector and map. If you have questions about that, you should post a new question.
    – Aesthete
    Mar 7, 2014 at 0:20
  • 1
    Thanks a lot for the help! I wouldn't have figured this out myself :)
    – Frederik
    Mar 7, 2014 at 0:22
  • So I have another problem now (I hope it's okay to add it here, since it's derived form this) What if I want to call the parent constructor, for the object? Example: GameWorld::GameWorld() : enemy1(parameters):GameObject(parameters) { Sadly that doesn't work, so what will? :P
    – Frederik
    Mar 7, 2014 at 1:36
0

I believe you would want to declare the GameObject within the GameWorld header, then create the GameObject object in the GameWorld constructor.

//GameWorld.h
#include GameObject.h

class GameWorld
{
private:
    GameObject object;

};

//GameWorld.cpp
#include GameWorld.h

GameWorld::GameWorld()
{
   object();
}

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