34

I am wondering if there is a way to use functions with summarise (dplyr 0.1.2) that return multiple values (for instance the describe function from psych package).

If not, is it just because it hasn't been implemented yet, or is there a reason that it wouldn't be a good idea?

Example:

require(psych)
require(ggplot2)
require(dplyr)

dgrp <- group_by(diamonds, cut)
describe(dgrp$price)
summarise(dgrp, describe(price))

produces: Error: expecting a single value

  • Could you clairify with some sample data? It's not clear what output you're hoping for. I know with ddply from the plyr package you can get multiple values with a function: ddply(df, .(group_variables),summarise,name=function(input)) – Christie Haskell Marsh Mar 7 '14 at 3:33
  • @86smopuiM, this is currently not possible. See this issue on dplyr github. See also this question and its comments – Henrik Mar 7 '14 at 5:48
  • @crmhaske, the diamonds data ships with ggplot. – Henrik Mar 7 '14 at 5:49
  • Next time, please try to search for the error message. – Henrik Mar 7 '14 at 6:02
  • There is the issue dplyr#2326 on GitHub where the devs try to find a syntax for this. – akraf Oct 16 '19 at 12:31
41

With dplyr >= 0.2 we can use do function for this:

library(ggplot2)
library(psych)
library(dplyr)
diamonds %>%
    group_by(cut) %>%
    do(describe(.$price)) %>%
    select(-vars)
#> Source: local data frame [5 x 13]
#> Groups: cut [5]
#> 
#>         cut     n     mean       sd median  trimmed      mad   min   max range     skew kurtosis       se
#>      (fctr) (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)  (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)
#> 1      Fair  1610 4358.758 3560.387 3282.0 3695.648 2183.128   337 18574 18237 1.780213 3.067175 88.73281
#> 2      Good  4906 3928.864 3681.590 3050.5 3251.506 2853.264   327 18788 18461 1.721943 3.042550 52.56197
#> 3 Very Good 12082 3981.760 3935.862 2648.0 3243.217 2855.488   336 18818 18482 1.595341 2.235873 35.80721
#> 4   Premium 13791 4584.258 4349.205 3185.0 3822.231 3371.432   326 18823 18497 1.333358 1.072295 37.03497
#> 5     Ideal 21551 3457.542 3808.401 1810.0 2656.136 1630.860   326 18806 18480 1.835587 2.977425 25.94233

Solution based on the purrr (purrrlyr since 2017) package:

library(ggplot2)
library(psych)
library(purrr)
diamonds %>% 
    slice_rows("cut") %>% 
    by_slice(~ describe(.x$price), .collate = "rows")
#> Source: local data frame [5 x 14]
#> 
#>         cut  vars     n     mean       sd median  trimmed      mad   min   max range     skew kurtosis       se
#>      (fctr) (dbl) (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)  (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl) (dbl) (dbl) (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)
#> 1      Fair     1  1610 4358.758 3560.387 3282.0 3695.648 2183.128   337 18574 18237 1.780213 3.067175 88.73281
#> 2      Good     1  4906 3928.864 3681.590 3050.5 3251.506 2853.264   327 18788 18461 1.721943 3.042550 52.56197
#> 3 Very Good     1 12082 3981.760 3935.862 2648.0 3243.217 2855.488   336 18818 18482 1.595341 2.235873 35.80721
#> 4   Premium     1 13791 4584.258 4349.205 3185.0 3822.231 3371.432   326 18823 18497 1.333358 1.072295 37.03497
#> 5     Ideal     1 21551 3457.542 3808.401 1810.0 2656.136 1630.860   326 18806 18480 1.835587 2.977425 25.94233

But it so simply with data.table:

as.data.table(diamonds)[, describe(price), by = cut]
#>          cut vars     n     mean       sd median  trimmed      mad min   max range     skew kurtosis       se
#> 1:     Ideal    1 21551 3457.542 3808.401 1810.0 2656.136 1630.860 326 18806 18480 1.835587 2.977425 25.94233
#> 2:   Premium    1 13791 4584.258 4349.205 3185.0 3822.231 3371.432 326 18823 18497 1.333358 1.072295 37.03497
#> 3:      Good    1  4906 3928.864 3681.590 3050.5 3251.506 2853.264 327 18788 18461 1.721943 3.042550 52.56197
#> 4: Very Good    1 12082 3981.760 3935.862 2648.0 3243.217 2855.488 336 18818 18482 1.595341 2.235873 35.80721
#> 5:      Fair    1  1610 4358.758 3560.387 3282.0 3695.648 2183.128 337 18574 18237 1.780213 3.067175 88.73281

We can write own summary function which returns a list:

fun <- function(x) {
    list(n = length(x),
         min = min(x),
         median = as.numeric(median(x)),
         mean = mean(x),
         sd = sd(x),
         max = max(x))
}
as.data.table(diamonds)[, fun(price), by = cut]
#>          cut     n min median     mean       sd   max
#> 1:     Ideal 21551 326 1810.0 3457.542 3808.401 18806
#> 2:   Premium 13791 326 3185.0 4584.258 4349.205 18823
#> 3:      Good  4906 327 3050.5 3928.864 3681.590 18788
#> 4: Very Good 12082 336 2648.0 3981.760 3935.862 18818
#> 5:      Fair  1610 337 3282.0 4358.758 3560.387 18574
  • 3
    Advice for future visitors: dplyr::do() does not work with dplyr::rowwise(). df %>% rowwise() %>% do(...) will replace all variables in df instead of adding on to them. You can, however, group with dplyr::group_by_all() which does the same thing as rowwise() unless you have rows which are exactly identical that you want to preserve. – divibisan Mar 29 '18 at 23:18
  • Also for future visitors, since 2017, the functions slice_rows and by_slice are not in the package purrr anymore (maybe in the package purrrlyr). – Dan Chaltiel Jan 20 at 20:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.