59

The following code does not work.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df=pd.DataFrame(['ONE','Two', np.nan],columns=['x']) 
xLower = df["x"].map(lambda x: x.lower())

How should I tweak it to get xLower = ['one','two',np.nan] ? Efficiency is important since the real data frame is huge.

  • From v0.25 onwards, I recommend str.casefold for more aggressive case folding string comparisons. More information in this answer. – cs95 May 10 at 20:18
132

use pandas vectorized string methods; as in the documentation:

these methods exclude missing/NA values automatically

.str.lower() is the very first example there;

>>> df['x'].str.lower()
0    one
1    two
2    NaN
Name: x, dtype: object
  • interestingly this is slower than the map method in the other answer 10000 loops, best of 3: 96.4 µs per loop versus 10000 loops, best of 3: 125 µs per loop – EdChum - Reinstate Monica Mar 7 '14 at 10:44
  • 1
    @EdChum that is not surprising with only 3 elements; but it wouldn't be the case with say just 100 elements; – behzad.nouri Mar 7 '14 at 10:57
14

Another possible solution, in case the column has not only strings but numbers too, is to use astype(str).str.lower() or to_string(na_rep='') because otherwise, given that a number is not a string, when lowered it will return NaN, therefore:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df=pd.DataFrame(['ONE','Two', np.nan,2],columns=['x']) 
xSecureLower = df['x'].to_string(na_rep='').lower()
xLower = df['x'].str.lower()

then we have:

>>> xSecureLower
0    one
1    two
2   
3      2
Name: x, dtype: object

and not

>>> xLower
0    one
1    two
2    NaN
3    NaN
Name: x, dtype: object

edit:

if you don't want to lose the NaNs, then using map will be better, (from @wojciech-walczak, and @cs95 comment) it will look something like this

xSecureLower = df['x'].map(lambda x: x.lower() if isinstance(x,str) else x)
  • 1
    Thanks, man! I forgot about NaNs, I just corrected the answer – Mike W May 17 at 6:37
6

A possible solution:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

df=pd.DataFrame(['ONE','Two', np.nan],columns=['x']) 
xLower = df["x"].map(lambda x: x if type(x)!=str else x.lower())
print (xLower)

And a result:

0    one
1    two
2    NaN
Name: x, dtype: object

Not sure about the efficiency though.

  • Same as the other answer, use isinstance when checking the type of an object. – cs95 May 17 at 5:43
3

Pandas >= 0.25: Remove Case Distinctions with str.casefold

Starting from v0.25, I recommend using the "vectorized" string method str.casefold if you're dealing with unicode data (it works regardless of string or unicodes):

s = pd.Series(['lower', 'CAPITALS', np.nan, 'SwApCaSe'])
s.str.casefold()

0       lower
1    capitals
2         NaN
3    swapcase
dtype: object

Also see related GitHub issue GH25405.

casefold lends itself to more aggressive case-folding comparison. It also handles NaNs gracefully (just as str.lower does).

But why is this better?

The difference is seen with unicodes. Taking the example in the python str.casefold docs,

Casefolding is similar to lowercasing but more aggressive because it is intended to remove all case distinctions in a string. For example, the German lowercase letter 'ß' is equivalent to "ss". Since it is already lowercase, lower() would do nothing to 'ß'; casefold() converts it to "ss".

Compare the output of lower for,

s = pd.Series(["der Fluß"])
s.str.lower()

0    der fluß
dtype: object

Versus casefold,

s.str.casefold()

0    der fluss
dtype: object

Also see Python: lower() vs. casefold() in string matching and converting to lowercase.

1

you can try this one also,

df= df.applymap(lambda s:s.lower() if type(s) == str else s)
  • type(s) == str should instead be isinstance(s, str) – cs95 May 17 at 5:24
1

May be using List comprehension

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df=pd.DataFrame(['ONE','Two', np.nan],columns=['Name']})
df['Name'] = [str(i).lower() for i in df['Name']] 

print(df)
0

copy your Dataframe column and simply apply

df=data['x'] newdf=df.str.lower()

0

Use apply function,

Xlower = df['x'].apply(lambda x: x.upper()).head(10)

  • As the Efficiency is important for the user (Efficiency is important since the real data frame is huge.) and there are a few more replies, please, try to expose which one is the good point of your answer. – David García Bodego Oct 16 at 10:35

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