0

The conventional wisdom says using your Windows user to login to SQL Server is more secure than using a SQL Server user to login. But isn't the authentication nearly identical?

When you login to SQL server with a database user, a login packet is created with the password encrypted. A certificate is attached to the packet and sent to the database. When the certificate is authenticated, the hashed password is matched to the hashed password stored in the database. If they match, you are logged in.

When you login to SQL server with a Windows user, MSGINA creates a login packet, but I'm not sure if or how it's encrypted. A certificate is attached and the packet is sent to LSA. When the certificate is authenticated, how are the credentials verified?

To make this question fair, assume the certificate service is the same, as well as the method to create the password hash. In this scenario, the two methods seem equally vulnerable to a man-in-the-middle type of attack intercepting the login packet.

2
0

Depends how you define "secure". There's more to security than the cryptographic details of the authentication mechanism. For example:

  • With SQL Server auth, accounts/passwords are under the control of the DBAs. With Windows auth (to a domain) they're under the control of the domain admins.

  • Security policy (e.g. password strength, password aging, password length, permitted login locations/times, disabling accounts) is readily administered (e.g. via group policy) and audited when using domain authentication.

  • Domain authentication can use multiple factors (e.g. security tokens), whereas SQL Server authentication (AFAIK) can't.

MITM vulns in AD authentication (and more broadly Kerberos in general) would be big news.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

Windows login is very secure - assuming Active Directory, you're sending a hash to AD to authenticate you which returns the ticket that is subsequently used to login to SQLServer.

However, this only applies to AD, local users use NTLM which is pretty old and is easily crackable by today's standards.

Windows logins are used to secure pretty much everything, including the user services like SQLServer runs as, so if its not the most secure then you have more worries than user login to your DB.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

The question is how you store the password and login information.

When you use Windows-login you can rely on authentication by your active directory server or simply the windows machine, while when login with SQL Server credentials you will need to have the password somewhere in a form that you'll need to encrypt it in order to add it to the connection string.

This might be fine if the application is on the server, but more complicated when it is a rich client which is accessing the server directly. If you have such a scenario in a company, it is better to let active directory deal with the authentication.

In general it is also easier to administrate when you have the same active directory use everywhere.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.