493

Just downloaded 3.1 and found in the docs...

Turn any fixed-width grid layout into a full-width layout by changing your outermost .container to .container-fluid.

Looking in bootstrap.css, it appears that .container-fluid is identical to .container. Both have the same CSS, and every instance of .container-fluid is paired with .container, and all column classes are specified in percentages.

When twiddling with examples I could not see any difference, as everything seemed fluid.

As I'm new to Bootstrap, I assume I'm missing something. Could someone take a minute and enlighten me?

  • 4
    I saw that one. It was posted a few revs back. container-fluid was taken out for 3.0, and added back for 3.1. – FatFingers Mar 8 '14 at 0:14
  • 1
    @Ranveer Definitely not a duplicate as this refers to > BS3 that is BS2.3 - Since that question doesn't answer could you please remove to not confuse future users – PW Kad Aug 28 '14 at 4:01
  • From the docs fluid covers the width of the whole viewport. (or is that of the whole current container or containing element?) In any case, why the name fluid? What is fluid as opposed to the non-fluid container? – pashute Dec 5 '18 at 14:07
684

Quick version: .container has one fixed width for each screen size in bootstrap (xs,sm,md,lg); .container-fluid expands to fill the available width.


The difference between container and container-fluid comes from these lines of CSS:

@media (min-width: 568px) {
  .container {
    width: 550px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 992px) {
  .container {
    width: 970px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 1200px) {
  .container {
    width: 1170px;
  }
}

Depending on the width of the viewport that the webpage is being viewed on, the container class gives its div a specific fixed width. These lines don't exist in any form for container-fluid, so its width changes every time the viewport width changes.

So for example, say your browser window is 1000px wide. As it's greater than the min-width of 992px, your .container element will have a width of 970px. You then slowly widen your browser window. The width of your .container won't change until you get to 1200px, at which it will jump to 1170px wide and stay that way for any larger browser widths.

Your .container-fluid element, on the other hand, will constantly resize as you make even the smallest changes to your browser width.

  • @jkillian That mean if I want to build full width layout, I should use .container-fluid and .container for boxed width, is it right? – Hung PD Oct 28 '14 at 17:36
  • 1
    @TheHung Depends exactly what you mean by 'full width', but container-fluid is what I'd go for in your case as far as I can tell – JKillian Oct 28 '14 at 17:39
  • @JKillian As many themes nowadays, they always have 2 layouts: Boxed and wide layout. Hope you can understand what I explaining. Sorry for bad english. – Hung PD Oct 28 '14 at 17:46
  • @JKillian How about use .container and .container-fluid in some cases? Ex.: (design.davidrozando.com/drew-html-v1.1/…). – Brightweb Apr 15 '15 at 4:02
  • 5
    @JKillian So why is container-fluid even needed? – user3638471 Nov 26 '15 at 23:47
176

I think you are saying that a container vs container-fluid is the difference between responsive and non-responsive to the grid. This is not true...what is saying is that the width is not fixed...its full width!

This is hard to explain so lets look at the examples


Example one

container-fluid:

http://www.bootply.com/119981

So you see how the container takes up the whole screen...that's a container-fluid.

Now lets look at the other just a normal container and watch the edges of the preview

Example two

container

http://www.bootply.com/119982

Now do you see the white space in the example? That's because its a fixed width container ! It might make more sense to open both examples up in two different tabs and switch back and forth.

EDIT

Better yet here is an example with both containers at once! Now you can really tell the difference!

http://www.bootply.com/119983

I hope this helped clarify a little bit!

  • the example with both types of containers have items that both change width. – ahnbizcad Jun 22 '14 at 23:37
  • 6
    Even knowing what the difference is, I found the "both" example confusing because of the shading. I forked your code to make what may be a clearer example for some: bootply.com/119983 (Also, .row-fluid is not needed in Bootstrap 3. Just use .row whether your container is fluid or not.) – Carl Bussema Jul 10 '14 at 13:56
  • Carl, your link goes to the same example as the original. If you still have your forked version, can you post the link? – Mike T Jul 18 '14 at 2:00
  • 5
    Here is a good fork example link, in case anyone else runs into this in the future. – Mike Collins Mar 29 '15 at 23:14
  • Thanks Mike the other example they looked the exact same on my browser. – eric Sep 22 '17 at 13:55
165

Both .container and .container-fluid are responsive (i.e. they change the layout based on the screen width), but in different ways (I know, the naming doesn't make it sound that way).

Short Answer:

.container is jumpy / choppy resizing, and

.container-fluid is continuous / fine resizing at width: 100%.

From a functionality perspective:

.container-fluid continuously resizes as you change the width of your window/browser by any amount, leaving no extra empty space on the sides ever, unlike how .container does. (Hence the naming: "fluid" as opposed to "digital", "discrete", "chunked", or "quantized").

.container resizes in chunks at several certain widths. In other words, it will be different specific aka "fixed" widths different ranges of screen widths.

Semantics: "fixed width"

You can see how naming confusion can arise. Technically, we can say .container is "fixed width", but it is fixed only in the sense that it doesn't resize at every granular width. It's actually not "fixed" in the sense that it's always stays at a specific pixel width, since it actually can change size.

From a fundamental perspective:

.container-fluid has the CSS property width: 100%;, so it continually readjusts at every screen width granularity.

.container-fluid {
  width: 100%;
}

.container has something like "width = 800px" (or em, rem etc.), a specific pixel width value at different screen widths. This of course is what causes the element width to abruptly jump to a different width when the screen width crosses a screen width threshold. And that threshold is governed by CSS3 media queries, which allow you to apply different styles for different conditions, such as screen width ranges.

@media screen and (max-width: 400px){
  .container {
    width: 123px;
  }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 401px) and (max-width: 800px){

  .container {
    width: 456px;
  }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 801px){
  .container {
    width: 789px;
  }
}

Beyond

You can make any fixed widths element responsive via media queries, not just .container elements, since media queries is exactly how .container is implemented by bootstrap in the background (see JKillian's answer for the code).

  • 1
    isn't the more accurate behavior for .container is Adaptive as opposed to Responsive? – ayjay Aug 20 '15 at 20:59
  • @ayjay you bring up a good point. Having terms to distinguish the continual resizing vs jumpy resizing would be useful. – ahnbizcad Aug 20 '15 at 21:33
  • 1
    @ayjay Adaptive detects the type of device the client is, and renders things server-side. Responsive doesn't care what device type the client is; it only cares about the width (due to media queries). As such, responsive is rendered client-side (css, javascript). see huffingtonpost.com/garrett-goodman/… and amberweinberg.com/is-it-adaptive-or-responsive-web-design IMO responsive is much easier to maintain and build than having completely different versions of your site for different devices. But your CSS has to account for all browsers. – ahnbizcad Aug 20 '15 at 21:35
  • @ajay Revisitingng this semantic question of adaptive vs responsive... since adaptive means it is detecting the device, and spitting out different html / css / js accordingly... it is conceivable that the html / css /js can contain a css style of width:100%;. and it can be for every device. In such a case, it is all adaptive, but still resizes continuously rather than abruptly in chunks... Thus it is not semantically correct to call it adaptive vs responsive – ahnbizcad Oct 29 '15 at 20:02
24

Use .container-fluid when you want your page to shapeshift with every little difference in its viewport size.

Use .container when you want your page to shapeshift to only 4 kinds of sizes, which are also known as "breakpoints".

The breakpoints corresponding to their sizes are:

  • Extra Small: (Only Mobile Resolution)
  • Small: 768px (Tablets)
  • Medium: 992px (Laptops)
  • Large: 1200px (Laptops/Desktops)
10

Updated 2019

The basic difference is that container is scales responsively, while container-fluid is always width:100%. Therefore in the root CSS definitions, they appear the same, but if you look further you'll see that .container is bound to media queries.

Bootstrap 4

The container has 5 widths...

.container {
  width: 100%;
}

@media (min-width: 576px) {
  .container {
    max-width: 540px;
  }
}

@media (min-width: 768px) {
  .container {
    max-width: 720px;
  }
}

@media (min-width: 992px) {
  .container {
    max-width: 960px;
  }
}

@media (min-width: 1200px) {
  .container {
    max-width: 1140px;
  }
}

Bootstrap 3

The container has 4 sizes. Full width on xs screens, and then it's width varies based on the following media queries..

    @media (min-width: 1200px) {
        .container {
            width: 1170px;
        }
    }
    @media (min-width: 992px) {
        .container {
            width: 970px;
        }
    }
    @media (min-width: 768px) {
        .container {
            width: 750px;
        }
    }

container vs. container-fluid demo

  • This has nothing to do with the question. Nice info but not relevant here. – BeNice Jun 21 at 12:45
  • Zim he was asking what was the DIFFERENCE between .container-fluid and .container. That was the info I was looking for. Your info is interesting but, when I came looking for the answer really confused the heck out of me for a couple of minutes. If it was listed AFTER the answers that answered the question that would be great but SO does not seem to let us suggest our own order. And reading my original comment I was not as clear as I could have been. Anyhoo thanks for the info. – BeNice Jun 21 at 16:51
  • In short, .container changes width according to media queries and .container-fluid changes width in real time (according to view-port width) – Hassan Tareq Aug 20 at 2:33
6

.container has a max width pixel value, whereas .container-fluid is max-width 100%.

.container-fluid continuously resizes as you change the width of your window/browser by any amount.

.container resizes in chunks at several certain widths, controlled by media queries (technically we can say it’s “fixed width” because pixels values are specified, but if you stop there, people may get the impression that it can’t change size – i.e. not responsive.)

  • Seems like overall container-fluid is better? More responsive to mobile phones which is a huge thing these days... – user9008566 Sep 24 '18 at 14:11
4

From a display perspective .container gives you more control over the what the users are seeing, and makes it easier to see what the users will see as you only have 4 variations of display (5 in the case of bootstrap 5) because the sizes relate to the same as the grid sizes. e.g. .col-xs, .col-sm, .col, and .col-lg.

What this means, is that when you are doing user testing if you test on a displays with the 4 different sizes you see all the veriations in display.

When using .container-fluid because the witdh is related to the viewport width the display is dynamic, so the varations are much greater and users with very large screens or uncommon screen widths may see results you weren't expecting.

0

You are right in 3.1 .container-fluid and .container are same and works like container but if you remove them it works like .container-fluid (full width). They had removed .container-fluid for "Mobile First Approach", but now it's back in 3.3.4 (and they will work differently)

To get latest bootstrap please read this post on stackoverflow it will help check it out.

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