84

I'm very new to C++ and struggling to figure out how I should iterate through a list of objects and access their members.

I've been trying this where data is a std::list and Student a class.

std::list<Student>::iterator<Student> it;
for (it = data.begin(); it != data.end(); ++it) {
    std::cout<<(*it)->name;
}

and getting the following error:

error: base operand of ‘->’ has non-pointer type ‘Student’
1
  • 2
    First you need to read more about how to declare iterator variables. Hint: They are not templates. Secondly, while the iterator can in some ways be treated as a pointer, once you dereference it it's not longer a "pointer" but a value. Mar 8, 2014 at 12:42

5 Answers 5

141

You're close.

std::list<Student>::iterator it;
for (it = data.begin(); it != data.end(); ++it){
    std::cout << it->name;
}

Note that you can define it inside the for loop:

for (std::list<Student>::iterator it = data.begin(); it != data.end(); ++it){
    std::cout << it->name;
}

And if you are using C++11 then you can use a range-based for loop instead:

for (auto const& i : data) {
    std::cout << i.name;
}

Here auto automatically deduces the correct type. You could have written Student const& i instead.

3
  • For the C++11 version, what s the maximum number of elements before a possible internal loop indice is overflown if any? I m talking about Visual Studio and gcc on Linux. Jan 1, 2021 at 19:55
  • @user2284570 There isn't any loop-index involved, only iterators. May 28, 2021 at 3:20
  • @Deduplicator I was meaning internally by the compiler. May 28, 2021 at 9:44
14

Since C++ 11, you could do the following:

for(const auto& student : data)
{
  std::cout << student.name << std::endl;
}
4
  • 2
    Is const mandatory in range-based loop or is avoiding it a bad habbit?
    – IzZy
    Aug 21, 2020 at 19:31
  • 2
    It's a best-practice to prevent you (or whoever modifies it after you) from changing the contents of the vector as it's iterating. If you're implementing a transformative function, you may want to mutate the vector and therefore drop the const. But it's typically not recommended to write code that does that in most industry standards.
    – jhill515
    Aug 22, 2020 at 23:23
  • For the C++11 version, what s the maximum number of elements before a possible internal loop indice is overflown if any? I m talking about Visual Studio and gcc on Linux. Jan 1, 2021 at 20:00
  • 1
    @user2284570 To my knowledge, you'll be limited to the maximum value of std::vector<T>::size_type, which is 2^64 / sizeof(T) (that is, the maximum number of objects that can be represented in the address space of memory. This is also why you shouldn't use STL containers to replace database in some situations.
    – jhill515
    Jan 3, 2021 at 21:06
3

-> it works like pointer u don't have to use *

for( list<student>::iterator iter= data.begin(); iter != data.end(); iter++ )
cout<<iter->name; //'iter' not 'it'
3

It is also worth to mention, that if you DO NOT intent to modify the values of the list, it is possible (and better) to use the const_iterator, as follows:

for (std::list<Student>::const_iterator it = data.begin(); it != data.end(); ++it){
    // do whatever you wish but don't modify the list elements
    std::cout << it->name;
}
1
  • 4
    Since C++11 we have cbegin() and cend().
    – Mikhail
    Nov 19, 2017 at 20:50
2

if you add an #include <algorithm> then you can use the for_each function and a lambda function like so:

for_each(data.begin(), data.end(), [](Student *it) 
{
    std::cout<<it->name;
});

you can read more about the algorithm library at https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm

and about lambda functions in cpp at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/cpp/cpp/lambda-expressions-in-cpp?view=vs-2019

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