189

If C does not support passing a variable by reference, why does this work?

#include <stdio.h>

void f(int *j) {
  (*j)++;
}

int main() {
  int i = 20;
  int *p = &i;
  f(p);
  printf("i = %d\n", i);

  return 0;
}

Output

$ gcc -std=c99 test.c
$ a.exe
i = 21 
  • 19
    Where in this code are you passing reference? – Atul Feb 27 '15 at 2:42
  • 11
    It should be noted that C doesn't have pass by reference, it can only be emulated using pointers. – Some programmer dude Mar 9 '16 at 13:05
  • 5
    The correct statement is "C does not support implicitly passing a variable by reference" -- you need to explicitly create a reference (with &) before calling the function and explicitly dereference it (with *) in the function. – Chris Dodd May 26 '17 at 18:49
  • 1
    Your code output exactly equals when call f(&i); this is a implementation of pass by reference, which is not exist purely in C.C pass by reference – EsmaeelE Jan 9 at 21:33

17 Answers 17

299

Because you're passing the value of the pointer to the method and then dereferencing it to get the integer that is pointed to.

  • 2
    f(p); -> does this mean passing by value? then dereferencing it to get the integer that is pointed to. -> could you please give more explanation. – bapi Mar 4 '14 at 13:02
  • 2
    @bapi, dereferencing a pointer means to "get the value that this pointer is referencing to". – Rauni Lillemets Nov 11 '14 at 13:35
  • 1
    An example would be nice ... – Pat R Ellery Jul 17 '15 at 0:20
  • What we call for the method of calling the function that takes address of the variable instead of passing the pointer. Example: func1(int &a) . Is this not a call by reference? In this case reference is really taken and in case of pointer, we are still passing by value because we are passing pointer by value only. – Jon Wheelock Oct 10 '15 at 17:14
  • When using pointers the key fact is that copy of the pointer is passed into the function. The function then uses that pointer, not the original one. This is still pass-by-value, but it works. – Danijel Nov 18 '16 at 10:24
103

That is not pass-by-reference, that is pass-by-value as others stated.

The C language is pass-by-value without exception. Passing a pointer as a parameter does not mean pass-by-reference.

The rule is the following:

A function is not able to change the actual parameters value.


Let's try to see the differences between scalar and pointer parameters of a function.

Scalar variables

This short program shows pass-by-value using a scalar variable. param is called the formal parameter and variable at function invocation is called actual parameter. Note incrementing param in the function does not change variable.

#include <stdio.h>

void function(int param) {
    printf("I've received value %d\n", param);
    param++;
}

int main(void) {
    int variable = 111;

    function(variable);
    printf("variable %d\m", variable);
    return 0;
}

The result is

I've received value 111
variable=111

Illusion of pass-by-reference

We change the piece of code slightly. param is a pointer now.

#include <stdio.h>

void function2(int *param) {
    printf("I've received value %d\n", *param);
    (*param)++;
}

int main(void) {
    int variable = 111;

    function2(&variable);
    printf("variable %d\n", variable);
    return 0;
}

The result is

I've received value 111
variable=112

That makes you believe that the parameter was passed by reference. It was not. It was passed by value, the param value being an address. The int type value was incremented, and that is the side effect that make us think that it was a pass-by-reference function call.

Pointers - passed-by-value

How can we show/prove that fact? Well, maybe we can try the first example of Scalar variables, but instead of scalar we use addresses (pointers). Let's see if that can help.

#include <stdio.h>

void function2(int *param) {
    printf("param's address %d\n", param);
    param = NULL;
}

int main(void) {
    int variable = 111;
    int *ptr = &variable;

    function2(ptr);
    printf("ptr's address %d\n", ptr);
    return 0;
}

The result will be that the two addresses are equal (don't worry about the exact value).

Example result:

param's address -1846583468
ptr's address -1846583468

In my opinion this proves clearly that pointers are passed-by-value. Otherwise ptr would be NULL after function invocation.

68

In C, Pass-by-reference is simulated by passing the address of a variable (a pointer) and dereferencing that address within the function to read or write the actual variable. This will be referred to as "C style pass-by-reference."

Source: www-cs-students.stanford.edu

48

Because there is no pass-by-reference in the above code. Using pointers (such as void func(int* p)) is pass-by-address. This is pass-by-reference in C++ (won't work in C):

void func(int& ref) {ref = 4;}

...
int a;
func(a);
// a is 4 now
  • 1
    I like the pass-by-address answer. Makes more sense. – Afzaal Ahmad Zeeshan Jun 7 '17 at 14:05
27

Your example works because you are passing the address of your variable to a function that manipulates its value with the dereference operator.

While C does not support reference data types, you can still simulate passing-by-reference by explicitly passing pointer values, as in your example.

The C++ reference data type is less powerful but considered safer than the pointer type inherited from C. This would be your example, adapted to use C++ references:

void f(int &j) {
  j++;
}

int main() {
  int i = 20;
  f(i);
  printf("i = %d\n", i);

  return 0;
}
  • 2
    That Wikipedia article is about C++, not C. References existed before C++ and don't depend on special C++ syntax to exist. – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 3:52
  • 1
    @Roger: Good point... I removed explicit reference to C++ from my answer. – Daniel Vassallo Feb 10 '10 at 8:44
  • 1
    And that new article says "a reference is often called a pointer" which isn't quite what your answer says. – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 16:13
12

You're passing a pointer(address location) by value.

It's like saying "here's the place with the data I want you to update."

6

p is a pointer variable. Its value is the address of i. When you call f, you pass the value of p, which is the address of i.

5

No pass-by-reference in C, but p "refers" to i, and you pass p by value.

5

In C everything is pass-by-value. The use of pointers gives us the illusion that we are passing by reference because the value of the variable changes. However, if you were to print out the address of the pointer variable, you will see that it doesn't get affected. A copy of the value of the address is passed-in to the function. Below is a snippet illustrating that.

void add_number(int *a) {
    *a = *a + 2;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
   int a = 2;

   printf("before pass by reference, a == %i\n", a);
   add_number(&a);
   printf("after  pass by reference, a == %i\n", a);

   printf("before pass by reference, a == %p\n", &a);
   add_number(&a);
   printf("after  pass by reference, a == %p\n", &a);

}

before pass by reference, a == 2
after  pass by reference, a == 4
before pass by reference, a == 0x7fff5cf417ec
after  pass by reference, a == 0x7fff5cf417ec
4

Because you're passing a pointer(memory address) to the variable p into the function f. In other words you are passing a pointer not a reference.

4

Short answer: Yes, C does implement parameter passing by reference using pointers.

While implementing parameter passing, designers of programming languages use three different strategies (or semantic models): transfer data to the subprogram, receive data from the subprogram, or do both. These models are commonly known as in mode, out mode, and inout mode, correspondingly.

Several models have been devised by language designers to implement these three elementary parameter passing strategies:

Pass-by-Value (in mode semantics) Pass-by-Result (out mode semantics) Pass-by-Value-Result (inout mode semantics) Pass-by-Reference (inout mode semantics) Pass-by-Name (inout mode semantics)

Pass-by-reference is the second technique for inout-mode parameter passing. Instead of copying data back and forth between the main routine and the subprogram, the runtime system sends a direct access path to the data for the subprogram. In this strategy the subprogram has direct access to the data effectively sharing the data with the main routine. The main advantage with this technique is that its absolutely efficient in time and space because there is no need to duplicate space and there is no data copying operations.

Parameter passing implementation in C: C implements pass-by-value and also pass-by-reference (inout mode) semantics using pointers as parameters. The pointer is send to the subprogram and no actual data is copied at all. However, because a pointer is an access path to the data of the main routine, the subprogram may change the data in the main routine. C adopted this method from ALGOL68.

Parameter passing implementation in C++: C++ also implements pass-by-reference (inout mode) semantics using pointers and also using a special kind of pointer, called reference type. Reference type pointers are implicitly dereferenced inside the subprogram but their semantics are also pass-by-reference.

So the key concept here is that pass-by-reference implements an access path to the data instead of copying the data into the subprogram. Data access paths can be explicitly dereferenced pointers or auto dereferenced pointers (reference type).

For more info please refer to the book Concepts of Programming Languages by Robert Sebesta, 10th Ed., Chapter 9.

3

You're not passing an int by reference, you're passing a pointer-to-an-int by value. Different syntax, same meaning.

  • 1
    +1 "Different syntax, same meaning." .. So the same thing, as the meaning matters more than the syntax. – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 3:51
  • Not true. By calling void func(int* ptr){ *ptr=111; int newValue=500; ptr = &newvalue } with int main(){ int value=0; func(&value); printf("%i\n",value); return 0; } , it prints 111 instead of 500. If you are passing by reference, it should print 500. C does not support passing parameter by reference. – Konfle Dolex Feb 24 '13 at 4:39
  • @Konfle, if you are syntactically passing by reference, ptr = &newvalue would be disallowed. Regardless of the difference, I think you are pointing out that "same meaning" is not exactly true because you also have extra functionality in C (the ability to reassign the "reference" itself). – xan Feb 24 '13 at 15:21
  • We never write something like ptr=&newvalue if it is passed by reference. Instead, we write ptr=newvalue Here is an example in C++: void func(int& ptr){ ptr=111; int newValue=500; ptr = newValue; } The value of the parameter passed into func() will become 500. – Konfle Dolex Feb 24 '13 at 17:58
  • In the case of my comment above, it is pointless to pass param by reference. However, if the param is an object instead of POD, this will make a significant difference because any changed after param = new Class() inside a function would have no effect for the caller if it is passed by value(pointer). If param is passed by reference, the changes would be visible for the caller. – Konfle Dolex Feb 24 '13 at 18:05
3

In C, to pass by reference you use the address-of operator & which should be used against a variable, but in your case, since you have used the pointer variable p, you do not need to prefix it with the address-of operator. It would have been true if you used &i as the parameter: f(&i).

You can also add this, to dereference p and see how that value matches i:

printf("p=%d \n",*p);
  • Why did you feel the need to repeat all of the code (including that comment block..) to tell him he should add a printf? – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 3:41
  • @Neil: That error was introduced by @William's edit, I'll reverse it now. And now it's apparent that tommieb is only mostly right: you can apply & to any object, not just variables. – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 5:07
2

pointers and references are two different thigngs.

A couple of things I have not seen mentioned.

A pointer is the address of something. A pointer can be stored and copied like any other variable. It thus have a size.

A reference should be seen as an ALIAS of something. It does not have a size and cannot be stored. It MUST reference something, ie. it cannot be null or changed. Well, sometimes the compiler needs to store the reference as a pointer, but that is an implementation detail.

With references you don't have the issues with pointers, like ownership handling, null checking, de-referencing on use.

1

'Pass by reference' (by using pointers) has been in C from the beginning. Why do you think it's not?

  • 6
    Because it's technically not passing by reference. – Mehrdad Afshari Feb 9 '10 at 14:32
  • 7
    Passing a pointer value is not the same as pass-by-reference. Updating the value of j (not *j) in f() has no effect on i in main(). – John Bode Feb 9 '10 at 14:34
  • 5
    It is semantically the same thing as passing by reference, and that's good enough to say it is passing by reference. True, the C Standard does not use the term "reference", but that neither surprises me nor is a problem. We are also not speaking standardese on SO, even though we may refer to the standard, otherwise we'd see no one talking about rvalues (the C Standard doesn't use the term). – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 3:45
  • 4
    @Jim: Thanks for telling us it was you that upvoted John's comment. – Roger Pate Feb 10 '10 at 3:46
1

I think C in fact supports pass by reference.

Most languages require syntactic sugar to pass by reference instead of value. (C++ for example requires & in the parameter declaration).

C also requires syntactic sugar for this. It's * in the parameter type declaration and & on the argument. So * and & is the C syntax for pass by reference.

One could now argue that real pass by reference should only require syntax on the parameter declaration, not on the argument side.

But now comes C# which does support by reference passing and requires syntactic sugar on both parameter and argument sides.

The argument that C has no by-ref passing cause the the syntactic elements to express it exhibit the underlying technical implementation is not an argument at all, as this applies more or less to all implementations.

The only remaining argument is that passing by ref in C is not a monolithic feature but combines two existing features. (Take ref of argument by &, expect ref to type by *.) C# for example does require two syntactic elements, but they can't be used without each other.

This is obviously a dangerous argument, cause lots of other features in languages are composed of other features. (like string support in C++)

1

What you are doing is pass by value not pass by reference. Because you are sending the value of a variable 'p' to the function 'f' (in main as f(p);)

The same program in C with pass by reference will look like,(!!!this program gives 2 errors as pass by reference is not supported in C)

#include <stdio.h>

void f(int &j) {    //j is reference variable to i same as int &j = i
  j++;
}

int main() {
  int i = 20;
  f(i);
  printf("i = %d\n", i);

  return 0;
}

Output:-

3:12: error: expected ';', ',' or ')' before '&' token
             void f(int &j);
                        ^
9:3:  warning: implicit declaration of function 'f'
               f(a);
               ^

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.