I have the following object structure:

@Document(collection = "user")
@TypeAlias("user")
public class User {
    @Id
    private ObjectId id;
    private Contact info = new Contact();
}

and here is the Contact pojo:

public class Contact {
    @Indexed(unique = true)
    private String mail;
}

But for some reasons not known to me, I don't see Spring-data creating a unique index for the property info.mail

To summarize, I have this json structure of user object: {_id:xxxxx,info:{mail:"abc@xyz.shoes"}}

And I want to create a unique index on info.mail using Spring data with the above pojo structure. Please help.

  • which version of spring-data-mongodb are you using? – Christoph Strobl Jan 23 '15 at 14:53
up vote 16 down vote accepted

As far as I remember, annotating embedded fields with @Indexed will not work. @CompoundIndex is the way to go:

@Document(collection = "user")
@TypeAlias("user")
@CompoundIndexes({
    @CompoundIndex(name = "contact_email", def = "{ 'contact.mail': 1 }", unique = true)
})
public class User {
    @Id
    private ObjectId id;
    private Contact info = new Contact();
}

Had the same issue, it seems that your Contact class is missing the @Document annotation i.e.

@Document
public class Contact {
    @Indexed(unique = true)
    private String mail;
}

Should work, quote from the spring mongodb reference

Automatic index creation is only done for types annotated with @Document.

  • 1
    I think that any embedded document doesn't require @Document because it's not a real document, but just a filed of a Document. – db80 Feb 12 '16 at 11:16
  • Sure, but you still have to hint the Spring MongoDB DSL implementation about how to transform and use the classes it it supposed to index. The Spring MongoDB will parse the classes internally for every class that use the @Document annotation and apply the @Indexed option for it. You can apply automatic index through the mongo console or via java code if you want. But if you want to benefit from the automatic stuff that Spring does for you, you just have to follow the rules in the documentation :P – cristobal Feb 12 '16 at 12:53
  • Otherwise it would be kind of hard for the Spring Mongo implementation, to just parse all the java files in the embedded code and check all the fields for every class that is annotated with the @Indexed annotation. The larger the code base the more time it would take. So the reason they have @Document is to hint the Spring Mongo implementation about which files to check for and apply the @Indexed option if set. – cristobal Feb 12 '16 at 12:55
  • 1
    I meant that you don't need to add any annotation in the embedded document. If you need to index a field of an embedded document you should use @CompoundIndex on the parent class. – db80 Feb 12 '16 at 15:00
  • Kind of find it strange the docs for Spring Mongo clearly show all the examples of the usage @CompoundIndex in conjunction with usage of the @Docucment annotation. – cristobal Feb 12 '16 at 15:04

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