15

I´m new in PHP and I´ve realised that my database connection, using a php form (with user and pass text inputs) was totally unsafe:

This was working, but was unsafe:

<?php
$link=mysqli_connect('localhost','xx','xx','xx');
$sql='  SELECT * FROM usuarios 
        WHERE username="'.$_POST['usuario'].'" 
        AND pass="'.$_POST['usuario'].'"
     ';
$rs=mysqli_query($link,$sql);
mysqli_close($link);
?>

So, I´ve read about mysqli_real_escape_string, and decided to try it out:

<?php    
$link=mysqli_connect('localhost','xx','xx','xx');
$usuario=mysqli_real_escape_string($link, $_POST["usuario"]);
$clave=mysqli_real_escape_string($link, $_POST["clave"]);
$sql='  SELECT * FROM usuarios 
        WHERE username="'.$usuario.'" 
        AND pass="'.$clave.'"
     ';
$rs=mysqli_query($link,$sql);
mysqli_close($link);
?>

Is this correct? Is this a good example of how to use mysqli_real_escape_string?

4
  • 3
    if you're using mysqli, then you shouldn't be escaping values yourself. use placeholders and let the database do all the work for you. But otherwise, yes, you're using it "correctly", inasmuch using an incorrect/obsolete coding method can be considered "correct" – Marc B Mar 10 '14 at 15:52
  • 3
    Prepared/parameterized queries are the way to go. I wouldn't call this correct. – Brad Mar 10 '14 at 15:55
  • 1
    FYI, having passwords in the database without encryption is about as bad as not escaping input. And I don't mean md5 -- use a proper one-way encryption with salt. – Ingo Bürk Jul 7 '14 at 5:09
  • Please give me example before mysqli_real_escape_string and after the string which gets generated. As it casuse confusion and no example is given. – Pratik Dec 12 '15 at 14:08
18

Is this correct?

Yes.

Is this a good example of how to use mysqli_real_escape_string?

NO

If ever used, this function have to be encapsulated into some inner processing, and never have to be called right from the application code. A placeholder have to be used instead, to represent data in your query:

$sql='SELECT * FROM usuarios WHERE username=? AND pass=?';

And then, upon processing placeholder marks, this function may be applied (if applicable) but not by itself but along ALL the formatting rules.

2
  • 6
    Please give me example before mysqli_real_escape_string and after the string which gets generated. As it casuse confusion and no example is given. – Pratik Dec 12 '15 at 14:08
  • 1
    could be mysqli_real_escape_string used together with a stored procedure? for example: $code = mysqli_real_escape_string($link, filter_var($_POST["code"], FILTER_SANITIZE_STRING)); mysqli_query($link, "CALL sp_updatetable('$code')") ? - please note: code isn't user input. – deblocker Oct 22 '17 at 22:10
7

Yes you will use it save now.

The nice thing about using mysqli is that it is Object oriented. So you can use it like this:

<?php

$mysqli = new mysqli("host", "user", "password", "database");

$usuario = $mysqli->real_escape_string($_POST["usuario"]);
$clave = $mysqli->real_escape_string($_POST["clave"]);

$sql='  SELECT * FROM usuarios 
        WHERE username="'.$usuario.'" 
        AND pass="'.$clave.'"
     ';

$mysqli->query($sql);

$mysqli->close();
?>

Or you can use PDO.

0
5

The use of mysqli() functions should only be reserved for framework developers and others who are aware of all the safety issues it can bring. For everyone else, there's PDO. It's just as easy to use as mysqli(), and far safer.

6
  • 6
    "It's just as easy to use as mysqli(), and far safer." - [citation needed] – Amal Murali Mar 10 '14 at 16:01
  • 2
    Well, the link I posted explains why PDO is safer than mysqli() and string concatenation. If you are still not convinced, there's this discussion that's from 2008, and still relevant today. Immunity against a large part of SQL attacks definitely qualifies as "far safer" in my opinion. – Ermir Mar 10 '14 at 16:05
  • 5
    I have read that article before and I don't see where it explains "PDO is safer". – Amal Murali Mar 10 '14 at 16:07
  • 1
    The article does not have to use the words "safer" to imply it. "Even if you're only going to use it once, using prepared statements will help protect you from SQL injection attacks." – Ermir Mar 10 '14 at 16:10
  • 6
    In case you didn't know that before, PDO doesn't hold the monopoly for the prepared statements. – Your Common Sense Mar 10 '14 at 16:13

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