6

I made a class that uses a SortedDictionary to store and manipulate data. The class works great except when it is implemented in a multi-threaded environment. Now, I would like to make the class thread safe by writing a wrapper class for the internal SortedDictionary class. I would like to use the Reader-Writer Locks to implement this but for now, I'm having problems just writing the wrapper class itself. Specifically, I'm not sure how to implement the Enumerator for the dictionary. Here is my complete code for the class as it stands now.

    public class ConcurrentSortedDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>
{
    #region Variables
    SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue> _dict;
    #endregion
    #region Constructors
    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary()
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    }

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary(IComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(comparer);
    }

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary)
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(dictionary);
    }

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, IComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(dictionary, comparer);
    }
    #endregion
    #region Properties
    public IComparer<TKey> Comparer
    {
        get 
        { 
            return _dict.Comparer;
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            return _dict.Count;
        }
    }

    public TValue this[TKey key]
    { 
        get
        {
            return _dict[key];
        }

        set
        {
            _dict[key] = value;
        }
    }

    public SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.KeyCollection Keys
    {
        get
        {
            return new SortedDictionary<TKey,TValue>.KeyCollection(_dict);
        }
    }

    public SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.ValueCollection Values
    {
        get
        {
            return new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.ValueCollection(_dict);
        }
    }

    #endregion
    #region Methods
    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        _dict.Add(key, value);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        _dict.Clear();
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(TKey key)
    {
        return _dict.ContainsKey(key);
    }

    public bool ContainsValue(TValue value)
    {
        return _dict.ContainsValue(value);
    }

    public void CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int index)
    {
        _dict.CopyTo(array, index);
    }

    public override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        return _dict.Equals(obj);
    }

    IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _dict.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _dict.GetHashCode();
    }

    public bool Remove(TKey key)
    {
        return _dict.Remove(key);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _dict.ToString();
    }

    public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value)
    {
        return _dict.TryGetValue(key, out value);
    }
    #endregion
}

When I compile the code, I get the error message:

'ConcurrentSortedDictionary' does not implement interface member 'System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()'. 'ConcurrentSortedDictionary.GetEnumerator()' cannot implement 'System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()' because it does not have the matching return type of 'System.Collections.IEnumerator'.

I looked at several posts here relating to this as a reference:

How do I implement IEnumerable in my Dictionary wrapper class that implements IEnumerable<Foo>? What's the best way of implementing a thread-safe Dictionary?

But I don't see what I'm doing wrong. Any assistance greatly appreciated.

  • Think this is very useful for future reference. Can you add the full working code as answer when you have your bugs sorted out? – Patrick Hofman Mar 10 '14 at 18:25
  • Hi Patrick, My updated code is posted now. It does work but is lacking some additional functionality which I addressed in my edit to the original question. – Jason O Mar 10 '14 at 21:12
  • Thanks for posting. Can you post it as answer instead of edit of your question? Other people will look for answers and you can receive up votes on the answer too. – Patrick Hofman Mar 11 '14 at 6:25
  • Thanks for the tip. I'm new to posting on this site and am still getting familiar with the interface. I moved my edit to a new answer. – Jason O Mar 11 '14 at 14:34
  • No problem. Thanks for posting the full code. +1 from me! – Patrick Hofman Mar 11 '14 at 14:35
2

The problem is here:

IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.GetEnumerator()
{
    return GetEnumerator();
}

public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
{
    return _dict.GetEnumerator();
}

You need:

public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
{
    return _dict.GetEnumerator();
}

IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
    return _dict.GetEnumerator();
}

The second non-generic GetEnumerator() is an explicit interface implementation and is needed as an unfortunate throwback to the days before generics and generic collections existed in C#.

See also: IEnumerable<T> provides two GetEnumerator methods - what is the difference between them? (and in particular Michael B's answer).

However if you want enumeration to be thread-safe along with the rest of your class, you may also need to write your own thread-safe IEnumerator type which cooperates with the reader/writer locks in your class!

  • Hi dvnrrs, Thank you for the correction. This absolutely solved my problem! I just added the Reader-Writer implementation and updated my original question. I also added a wrapper class for IEnumerable based on a code example from codeproject.com/Articles/56575/Thread-safe-enumeration-in-C. It seems to also be working well although I ran into another problem which I mentioned in my edit to the original question. – Jason O Mar 10 '14 at 21:09
1

After implementing the suggestion by dvnrrs, I now have the class working well. I even added a wrapper class for the IEnumerable interface to protect enumerations of the SortedDictionary (code modified from this example here: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/56575/Thread-safe-enumeration-in-C). Here is the updated code with the Reader-Writer Locks included:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections;
using System.Threading;

public class SafeEnumerator<T> : IEnumerator<T>
{
    #region Variables

    // this is the (thread-unsafe)
    // enumerator of the underlying collection
    private readonly IEnumerator<T> _enumerator;

    // this is the object we shall lock on. 
    private ReaderWriterLockSlim _lock;

    #endregion 

    #region Constructor

    public SafeEnumerator(IEnumerator<T> inner, ReaderWriterLockSlim readWriteLock)
    {
        _enumerator = inner;
        _lock = readWriteLock;

        // Enter lock in constructor
        _lock.EnterReadLock();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Implementation of IDisposable

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // .. and exiting lock on Dispose()
        // This will be called when the foreach loop finishes
        _lock.ExitReadLock();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Implementation of IEnumerator

    // we just delegate actual implementation
    // to the inner enumerator, that actually iterates
    // over some collection

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        return _enumerator.MoveNext();
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        _enumerator.Reset();
    }

    public T Current
    {
        get 
        { 
            return _enumerator.Current; 
        }
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get 
        { 
            return Current; 
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

public class ConcurrentSortedDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>
{
    #region Variables

    private ReaderWriterLockSlim _readWriteLock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();
    SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue> _dict;

    #endregion

    #region Constructors

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary()
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    }

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary(IComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(comparer);
    }

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary)
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(dictionary);
    }

    public ConcurrentSortedDictionary(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, IComparer<TKey> comparer)
    {
        _dict = new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(dictionary, comparer);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    public IComparer<TKey> Comparer
    {
        get 
        {
            _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
            try
            {
                return _dict.Comparer;
            }
            finally
            {
                _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
            }
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
            try
            {
                return _dict.Count;
            }
            finally
            {
                _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
            }
        }
    }

    public TValue this[TKey key]
    { 
        get
        {
            _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
            try
            {
                return _dict[key];
            }
            finally
            {
                _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
            }
        }
        set
        {
            _readWriteLock.EnterWriteLock();
            try
            {
                _dict[key] = value;
            }
            finally
            {
                _readWriteLock.ExitWriteLock();
            }
        }
    }

    public SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.KeyCollection Keys
    {
        get
        {
            _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
            try
            {
                return new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.KeyCollection(_dict);
            }
            finally
            {
                _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
            }
        }
    }

    public SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.ValueCollection Values
    {
        get
        {
            _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
            try
            {
                return new SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>.ValueCollection(_dict);
            }
            finally
            {
                _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
            }
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region Methods

    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            _dict.Add(key, value);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            _dict.Clear();
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(TKey key)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.ContainsKey(key);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    public bool ContainsValue(TValue value)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.ContainsValue(value);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    public void CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int index)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            _dict.CopyTo(array, index);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.Equals(obj);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new SafeEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>(_dict.GetEnumerator(), _readWriteLock);
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new SafeEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>(_dict.GetEnumerator(), _readWriteLock);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.GetHashCode();
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    public bool Remove(TKey key)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.Remove(key);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.ToString();
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value)
    {
        _readWriteLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return _dict.TryGetValue(key, out value);
        }
        finally
        {
            _readWriteLock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }

    #endregion
}
  • If you have another question you should ask a new question. Asking a question in an answer is not appropriate. – Servy Mar 11 '14 at 14:46
  • Will do, thank you. – Jason O Mar 11 '14 at 15:12
  • 1
    Hi, this still gave me the error:"Collection was modified after the enumerator was instantiated." but it only happens once very rarely so vast improvement on what I was using. Cheers – Andrew Simpson Jul 20 '15 at 18:29
  • This implementation is not thread safe. Mistake is in the GetEnumerator() methods: enumerator is taken not under the lock. So the underlying collection may change in between enumerator is taken and iteration starts. – andreycha Apr 11 '17 at 13:53
  • Also, Keys and Values properties has the same issue. Keys and values collections are created under the lock, but if you later want to iterate over them, it won't be thread safe. It's better to return a snapshotted copy of all the keys/values, just like ConcurrentDictionary does. – andreycha Apr 11 '17 at 14:06

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