1

In Railscasts Episode 388 - Multitenancy with Scopes, Ryan is adding a default scope to ensure security:

Alternatively we can use an authorization library such as CanCan to handle the scoping but this isn’t designed for a multi-tenant apps and it won’t solve this problem very well. This is one case where it’s acceptable to use a default scope so that’s what we’ll do.

class Tenant < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name, :subdomain
  has_many :topics
end

class Topic < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name, :content
  belongs_to :user
  has_many :posts

  default_scope { where(tenant_id: Tenant.current_id) }
end

My question is: I want to implement authorization (for example with Cancan) and would like to define abilities like these:

class Ability
  include CanCan::Ability

  def initialize(user)
    user ||= User.new # guest user (not logged in)
    if user.admin?
      can :manage, Topic
    else
      can :read, Topic
    end
  end
end

Does the user have the ability to manage the topics of all tenants or only within the tenants scope?

Or a more general question: what's the right method of authorization for multi tenant applications?

4
+50

You are on the right track using CanCan, or CanCanCan since CanCan is deprecated, I think.

I don't like the default_scope for the reason that it is not threadsafe. The user id is stored in a class variable, which means that two or more concurrent users in your app will break this unless you use Unicorn or some other web server that makes sure no more than one single client connection will access the same thread.

You should therefore use something like Cancan.

class Ability
  include CanCan::Ability

  def initialize(user)
    user ||= User.new # guest user (not logged in)
    if user.admin?
      # User's own Topics only:
      can :manage, Topic, user_id: user.id
      # or, with a Tenant
      can :manage, Topic, tenant_id: user.tenant.id if user.tenant # User belongs_to Tenant
      can :manage, Topic, tenant_id: user.tenants.map(&:id) if user.tenants.any? # User has_many Tenants
    else
      can :read, Topic # Anyone can read any topic.
    end
  end
end

Pick the strategy you need from the three examples above.


EDIT Slightly more complicated example for Multi-Tenant Admins for @JoshDoody's question in the comments:


class Admin < User; end

class TenantAdmin
  belongs_to :tenant
  belongs_to :admin, class_name: User
end

class Ability
  include CanCan::Ability

  def initialize(user)
    user ||= User.new # guest user (not logged in)
    if user.admin?
      can :manage, Topic, tenant_id: TenantAdmin.where(admin: user).map(&:tenant_id)
    else
      can :read, Topic # Anyone can read any topic
    end
  end
end

Now, it might be that this is not as performant as you would like, but the general idea is that you have TenantAdmins who will be able to manage Topics within their Tenants.

Hope this helps.

  • This is a great answer. How might this look for a multi-tenant app where a user can have various roles per tenant. So, a user isn't just an admin, but an admin FOR A TENANT, and may not be an admin for other tenants. I would say your third example as "if a user is an admin, the user can manage Topics for all of his tenants". So that example assumes the user is an admin for the entire app, and can therefore manage Topics for all tenants in the app as long as he is a member of the tenant. But I wonder how to say, "A user can manage Topics for those tenants where he is an admin." Ideas? – JoshDoody May 4 '14 at 1:23
  • @JoshDoody I updated the answer with some sort of a solution for your case. Again, hope this helps. – wrdevos May 9 '14 at 13:30
  • This is pretty helpful - thanks! I actually built something up that I'm trying (it's similar to yours), and I'll try to post it later to see what you think. (I'll just add another answer with my code.) But this is good and helpful - thanks! – JoshDoody May 9 '14 at 14:03
  • I was just googling about this same problem and bumped into this old thread. So I obviously didn't fix my problem very well. :) Question about your last solution (which you edited specifically to address my use-case): You're suggesting something like that to switch from default_scopes to handling this EXCLUSIVELY in CanCan, correct? So, if done right, all default_scope { where(tenant_id: Tenant.current_id) } would be replaced by CanCan abilities similar to the one you show in your edited example? If so, how do you handle basic filtering (in controller) based on Tenant.current_id? – JoshDoody Oct 26 '14 at 14:59
  • @wrdevos in the railscast Ryan said: "We can find another potential issue in the Tenant model where we call cattr_accessor for the current_id attribute. While this is convenient it’s not really thread-safe so we might want to do something like this instead: Thread.current[:tenant_id] = id, Now we have getter and setter methods that use Thread.current to set the value which is more thread-safe". Do you still feel using default_scope with this implementation is not thread-safe? – Marklar Sep 2 '16 at 7:27
2

You have set ability just for Topic. So, it will check only for topic object.

To have a check for tenant level you need to set something like this:

class Ability
  include CanCan::Ability

  def initialize(user)
    user ||= User.new # guest user (not logged in)
    can :manage, Tenant do |tenant|
      if user.admin?
        `you code goes here`
      else
      end
    end
    can :read, Tenant
    can :read, Topic
  end
end
1

Му example of ability for multitenent app

class Ability
  def initialize(admin,  tenant = nil)
     user ||= User.new
     if user.admin?
       can :manage, Topic
     else
       can :manage, PostState, tenant: tenant
     end
  end
end

You may not pass tenant and use Tenant.current_id

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