13

Below is my pseudo code.

function highest(i, j, k)
{
  if(i > j && i > k)
  {
    return i;
  }
  else if (j > k)
  {
    return j;
  }
  else
  {
    return k;
  }
}

I think that works, but is that the most efficient way in C++?

8
  • Could you use this at all? cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/max
    – alex
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:02
  • 15
    In this case if it is homework, it's OK, since the questioner has made an attempt, shown his code and is asking for improvement. That meets all the guidelines for posting homework questions on SO.
    – Jasarien
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:03
  • @ Robert Greiner ha ha, no. though it would make a great homework question, no?
    – Stephano
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:03
  • 4
    @Stephano: You profile it and determine if it's the main slow-down in your program. It's a common error to worry about the efficiency of everything; just make the code easy to understand and easy to write, and let the compiler do it's part.
    – GManNickG
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:07
  • 9
    Here's the most efficient way possible: /* Precondition: i is the largest value of the three. */ int max(int i, int j, int k) { return i; } or possibly just return 42.
    – Skurmedel
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:09

13 Answers 13

26

To find the greatest you need to look at exactly 3 ints, no more no less. You're looking at 6 with 3 compares. You should be able to do it in 3 and 2 compares.

int ret = max(i,j);
ret = max(ret, k);
return ret;
11
  • 4
    Could make a nice little function: template <typename T> const T& max(const T& pA, const T& pB, const T& pC){ return max(pA, max(pB, pC)); }
    – GManNickG
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:04
  • 9
    max(i, max(j, k)) saves it to one line. I like the template version too Feb 9 '10 at 23:05
  • 1
    Of course, if max is a macro or an inline function, max(i, max(j, k)) is going to expand to something along the lines of i > ( j > k ? j : k ) ? i : ( j > k ? j : k ) (CSE optimization notwithstanding) and if it isn't, you have function call overhead. Are we talking about programmer efficiency or computational efficiency?
    – Duncan
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:21
  • 1
    @Duncan: You're wrong about when it's an inline function, and since this question is C++, we're talking about std::max. A macro named 'max' is, in C++, pure abomination.
    – Roger Pate
    Feb 10 '10 at 0:18
  • 1
    @Roger Pate: Macros are an abomination even in C :). Perhaps I should have said "..a template or inline ...." So what happens for an inline expression? Surely that will inline to something like rv1 = j > k ? j : k; rv2 = i > rv1 ? i : rv1; return rv2; which is the same thing only with CSE. Have I missed something? Perhaps things have changed in the 2 decades since I last bothered looking at generated assembly language. I don't mind being told I'm wrong, though I do prefer to be told why :)
    – Duncan
    Feb 10 '10 at 1:11
16

Pseudocode:

result = i
if j > result:
  result = j
if k > result:
  result = k
return result
3
  • I like that you only used if statements. This is a clean answer.
    – Stephano
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:31
  • Excellent! Very clear, and makes it very likely that if the hardware has predicated instructions like cmov, the compiler will use them. +1 (wish I could +10 past the evil max) Feb 10 '10 at 0:14
  • Great answer. As simple as it could get with no attempt at being clever. +1 for humility.
    – IV.
    Feb 10 '10 at 1:04
13

How about

return i > j? (i > k? i: k): (j > k? j: k);

two comparisons, no use of transient temporary stack variables...

2
  • 6
    +1. Nifty. Mesmerizing and hurtful to the eyes at the same time.
    – Skurmedel
    Feb 9 '10 at 23:17
  • +1 for being the first person to mention the one-line solution. i may loath the idea of trying to make everything shorter, but every now and again someone shows me a 1-liner that is quite impressive.
    – Stephano
    Feb 12 '10 at 3:11
8

Your current method: http://ideone.com/JZEqZTlj (0.40s)

Chris's solution:

int ret = max(i,j);
ret = max(ret, k);
return ret;

http://ideone.com/hlnl7QZX (0.39s)

Solution by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams:

result = i;
if (j > result)
  result = j;
if (k > result)
  result = k;
return result;

http://ideone.com/JKbtkgXi (0.40s)

And Charles Bretana's:

return i > j? (i > k? i: k): (j > k? j: k);

http://ideone.com/kyl0SpUZ (0.40s)

Of those tests, all the solutions take within 3% the amount of time to execute as the others. The code you are trying to optimize is extremely short as it is. Even if you're able to squeeze 1 instruction out of it, it's not likely to make a huge difference across the entirety of your program (modern compilers might catch that small optimization). Spend your time elsewhere.

EDIT: Updated the tests, turns out it was still optimizing parts of it out before. Hopefully it's not anymore.

2
  • ok, I'm (slightly) happier with the updated version. SO won't let me remove the -1 though ("Vote too old to be changed, unless this answer is edited"), sorry. Feb 10 '10 at 10:45
  • 2
    Wow, sweet. I had no idea ideone existed. this gives me something to do when I can't sleep :) .
    – Stephano
    Feb 12 '10 at 3:12
6

For a question like this, there is no substitute for knowing just what your optimizing compiler is doing and just what's available on the hardware. If the fundamental tool you have is binary comparison or binary max, two comparisons or max's are both necessary and sufficient.

I prefer Ignacio's solution:

result = i;
if (j > result)
  result = j;
if (k > result)
  result = k;
return result;

because on the common modern Intel hardware, the compiler will find it extremely easy to emit just two comparisons and two cmov instructions, which place a smaller load on the I-cache and less stress on the branch predictor than conditional branches. (Also, the code is clear and easy to read.) If you are using x86-64, the compiler will even keep everything in registers.

Note you are going to be hard pressed to embed this code into a program where your choice makes a difference...

4

I like to eliminate conditional jumps as an intellectual exercise. Whether this has any measurable effect on performance I have no idea though :)

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

inline int max(int a, int b)
{
    int difference = a - b;
    int b_greater = difference >> std::numeric_limits<int>::digits;
    return a - (difference & b_greater);
}

int max(int a, int b, int c)
{
    return max(max(a, b), c);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << max(1, 2, 3) << std::endl;
    std::cout << max(1, 3, 2) << std::endl;
    std::cout << max(2, 1, 3) << std::endl;
    std::cout << max(2, 3, 1) << std::endl;
    std::cout << max(3, 1, 2) << std::endl;
    std::cout << max(3, 2, 1) << std::endl;
}

This bit twiddling is just for fun, the cmov solution is probably a lot faster.

1
  • The shifting plus binary-anding is clever! Aug 15 '13 at 4:32
3

Not sure if this is the most efficient or not, but it might be, and it's definitely shorter:

int maximum = max( max(i, j), k);
1

There is a proposal to include this into the C++ library under N2485. The proposal is simple, so I've included the meaningful code below. Obviously, this assumes variadic templates

template < typename T >
const T & max ( const T & a )
{ return a ; }

template < typename T , typename ... Args >
const T & max( const T & a , const T & b , const Args &... args )
{ return  max ( b > a ? b : a , args ...); }
0
public int maximum(int a,int b,int c){
    int max = a;
    if(b>max)
        max = b;
    if(c>max)
        max = c;
    return max;
}
0
0

I think by "most efficient" you are talking about performance, trying not to waste computing resources. But you could be referring to writing fewer lines of code or maybe about the readability of your source code. I am providing an example below, and you can evaluate if you find something useful or if you prefer another version from the answers you received.

/* Java version, whose syntax is very similar to C++. Call this program "LargestOfThreeNumbers.java" */
class LargestOfThreeNumbers{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        int x, y, z, largest;
        x = 1;
        y = 2;
        z = 3;
        largest = x;
        if(y > x){
            largest = y;
            if(z > y){
                largest = z;
            }
        }else if(z > x){
            largest = z;
        }
        System.out.println("The largest number is: " + largest);
    }
}
0
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int a,b,c,d,e;
    scanf("%d %d %d",&a,&b,&c);
    d=(a+b+abs(a-b))/2;
    e=(d+c+abs(c-d))/2;
    printf("%d is Max\n",e);
    return 0;
}
-1

The easiest way to find a maximum or minimum of 2 or more numbers in c++ is:-

int a = 3, b = 4, c = 5;
int maximum = max({a, b, c});

int a = 3, b = 4, c = 5;
int minimum = min({a, b, c});

You can give as many variables as you want.

Interestingly enough it is also incredibly efficient, at least as efficient as Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams'solution (https://godbolt.org/z/j1KM97):

        mov     eax, dword ptr [rsp + 8]
        mov     ecx, dword ptr [rsp + 4]
        cmp     eax, ecx
        cmovl   eax, ecx
        mov     ecx, dword ptr [rsp]
        cmp     eax, ecx
        cmovl   eax, ecx

Similar with GCC, while MSVC makes a mess with a loop.

-1

In C# finding the greatest and smallest number between 3 digit

static void recorrectFindSmallestNumber()
{
int x = 30, y = 22, z = 11;
if (x < y)
{
if (x < z)
{
Console.WriteLine("X is Smaller Numebr {0}.", x);
}
else
{
Console.WriteLine("z is Smaller Numebr {0}.", z);
}
}
else if (x > y)
{
if (y < z)
{
Console.WriteLine("y is Smaller number.{0}", y);
}
else
{
Console.WriteLine("z is Smaller number.{0}", z);
}
}
 else
{

}
}

=================================================================

static void recorrectFindLargeNumber()
{
int x, y, z;
Console.WriteLine("Enter the first number:");
x = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
Console.WriteLine("Enter the second number:");
y = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
Console.WriteLine("Enter the third nuumnber:");
z = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
if (x > y)
{
if (x > z)
{
Console.WriteLine("X is Greater numbaer: {0}.", x);
}
else
{
Console.WriteLine("Z is greatest number: {0}.", z);
}
}
else if (x < y)
{
if (y > z)
{
Console.WriteLine("y is Greater Number: {0}", y);
}
else 
{
Console.WriteLine("Z is Greater Number; {0}", z);                
}
}
else
{
                
}
}

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