This question already has an answer here:

All I want is for bool(myInstance) to return False (and for myInstance to evaluate to False when in a conditional like if/or/and. I know how to override >, <, =)

I've tried this:

class test:
    def __bool__(self):
        return False

myInst = test()
print bool(myInst) #prints "True"
print myInst.__bool__() #prints "False"

Any suggestions?

(I am using Python 2.6)

marked as duplicate by wim python Jan 5 '17 at 3:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Is this Python 2.x or Python 3.x? For Python 2.x you are looking to override __nonzero__ instead.

class test:
    def __nonzero__(self):
        return False
  • 1
    Thanks for this... I was looking for a way to test the __nonzero__ class method for testing False here – TrinitronX Sep 24 '14 at 3:21

If you want to keep your code forward compatible with python3 you could do something like this

class test:
    def __bool__(self):
        return False
    __nonzero__=__bool__

if test is list-like, define len and bool(myInstanceOfTest) will return True/False if there are 1+ or 0 items. This worked for me.

class MinPriorityQueue(object):
    def __init__(self, iterable):
        self.priorityQueue = heapq.heapify(iterable)
    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.priorityQueue)

>>> bool(MinPriorityQueue([])
False
>>> bool(MinPriorityQueue([1,3,2])
True
  • 1
    That's handy. Thanks for this alternate solution. – Ponkadoodle Nov 20 '13 at 0:44
  • This is actually the best solution as it is compatible with both Python3 and Python2 to my knowledge. Even if it is not an iterable you could implement something to mock it. – cal97g May 2 at 18:06

test.__nonzero__()

  • 1
    It is short and code only (with a link) but it does answer the question... – rene Jan 1 '14 at 20:01

Similar to John La Rooy, I use:

class Test(object):
    def __bool__(self):
        return False

    def __nonzero__(self):
        return self.__bool__()

[this is a comment to the answer from @john-la-rooy but I cannot comment yet :) ]

For Python3 compatibility you can do (I was looking for this)

class test(object):
    def __bool__(self):
        return False

    __nonzero__=__bool__

only problem is that you need to repeat the __nonzero__ = __bool__ everytime you change __bool__ in subclasses. Otherwise __nonzero__ will be kept from the superclass. You can try

from builtins import object  # needs to be installed !

class test(object):
    def __bool__(self):
        return False

    __nonzero__=__bool__

which should work (not confirmed) or write a metaclass :) yourself.

  • Or use the approach from tknickman to avoid this issue. It will add another function call though! – jhp Jan 11 '17 at 10:13

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