2

I have written a java program. Now I would like to open my console java application without IDE, Eclipse etc., but just by double clicking on the executable version on my Desktop.

I have exported the java project in Runnable .JAR file, but it cannot be opened. When I tried to open the application with cmd. java -jar ApplicatonName.jar and everything is fine. But this process is too complicated, and it's not user-friendly.

So is there any possible way to do such thing with JAVA ?

Thanks in advance :)

  • Maybe check out Launch4j – Mike Christensen Mar 11 '14 at 22:55
  • This will come down to what the OS associates with *.jar - The other issue is, normally, double clicking icons is associated with GUI based applications, not console based applications, so why double clicking the icon might appear to do nothing, the application has been started, but it has nothing to show... – MadProgrammer Mar 11 '14 at 22:55
3

Create a bat or sh file, depending on the operating system, and put java -jar ApplicationName.jar in that file.

You can double click on that file to launch your application.

Example for Windows:

Create a file MyProgram.bat. Open the file in a text editor. Add java -jar MyApplicationName.jar (replace MyApplicationName by the name of your application/the name of the jar). Save the file. Double click the created file to open your program.

1

I had the same problem this morning, searched a bit, and create a static class from the available knowledge. It solves the problem for Windows, but users of other systems should be able to easily add what's necessary - I just didn't know the correct system command (if there is one). I left the printEnvironmentInfo() method in for assistance.

What it does:

It enables double-click start for standard Java console applications without altering the operating system or creating files. The procedure is this:

  1. It just returns in case you are in the IDE.

  2. It just returns in case you have a console.

  3. It starts the currently running .jar file in a new console and EXITS.

How to use:

  1. Create Java console application.

  2. Create class file AutoRunFromConsole and paste the below code under the package statement, replacing everything.

  3. As (one of) the first statement(s) in your main method, do AutoRunFromConsole.runYourselfInConsole(true); (or false if you want the console to close once your application has ended).

How it works:

The .jar file name of the running Java application is determined, and it's checked if that file actually exists in the current directory and if it is actually a file.

If this does not work, we must be in the IDE and hence have a console. This should be reliable, but there is an alternative approach: A different call to the (overloaded) method allows you to hand over your main method's command line arguments. If the first argument is "ide" (Case is ignored.), the method just returns. When this other call is used, then if the executable name could not be determined (For which you can even give a fallback.), a message is shown (see below).

Checks if System.console() returns null. If not, it just returns.

Determines a command line string based on operating system (SO FAR ONLY FOR WINDOWS, but you just need to fill in the blanks) and then executes it with Runtime.getRuntime().exec();. In case the OS is not supported yet, a message window is shown saying that the program needs to be run from the console, incl. the syntax.

In case you have improvements (especially working command line strings for other systems), please let me know.

import javax.swing.*;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.security.CodeSource;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Properties;




/**
 * Created by Reddit user king_of_the_universe / StackOverflow user Dreamspace President / dreamspace-president.com
 * <p>
 * v[(2), 2015-11-13 13:00 UTC]
 * <p>
 * One static method call will start a new instance of *THIS* application in the console and will EXIT the current
 * instance. SO FAR ONLY WORKS ON WINDOWS! Users of other systems need to assist here. The methods are all in place.
 */
final public class AutoRunFromConsole {


    final private static String FAILMESSAGE_TITLE = "Please run in console.";
    final private static String FAILMESSAGE_BODY = "This application must be run in the console (or \"command box\").\n\nIn there, you have to type:\n\njava -jar nameofprogram.jar";


    private static void showFailMessageAndExit() {

        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, FAILMESSAGE_BODY, FAILMESSAGE_TITLE, JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
        System.exit(0);
    }


    private enum OSType {
        UNDETERMINED, WINDOWS, LINUX, MACOS
    }


    private static OSType getOsType() {

        //        final String osName = System.getProperty("os.name");
        //        final String osVersion = System.getProperty("os.version");
        //        final String osArchitecture = System.getProperty("os.arch");
        //        System.out.println("\n\nOSNAME: " + osName);
        //        System.out.println("\n\nOSVERSION: " + osVersion);
        //        System.out.println("\n\nOSARCHITECTURE: " + osArchitecture);

        final String osName = System.getProperty("os.name", "").toLowerCase();
        if (osName.startsWith("windows")) {
            return OSType.WINDOWS;
        } else if (osName.startsWith("linux")) {
            return OSType.LINUX;
        } else if (osName.startsWith("mac os") || osName.startsWith("macos") || osName.startsWith("darwin")) {
            return OSType.MACOS;
        }

        return OSType.UNDETERMINED;
    }


    /**
     * Checks if the program is currently running in console, and if not, starts the program from console and EXITS this
     * instance of the program. Should be (one of) the first calls in your program.
     * <p>
     * This is the less safe variant of the method: To check if you're currently in the IDE, it just tries to find the
     * executable name and if it exists in the current path. This should word perfectly at all times in IntelliJ - I
     * don't know what values getExecutableName() returns inside Eclipse, but I suspect it will work just as well.
     * <p>
     * It's also less safe because you can't give a fallback executable name, but I believe it should do the trick in
     * all situations.
     * <p>
     * If this is used on a system other than Windows, a message box is shown telling the user to start the program from
     * the console. BECAUSE I DON'T KNOW HOW TO OPEN A CONSOLE ON OTHER SYSTEMS. SEE startExecutableInConsole();
     */
    public static void runYourselfInConsole(final boolean stayOpenAfterEnd) {

        runYourselfInConsole(false, stayOpenAfterEnd, null, null);
    }


    /**
     * Checks if the program is currently running in console, and if not, starts the program from console and EXITS this
     * instance of the program. Should be (one of) the first calls in your program.
     * <p>
     * This is the safer variant of the method: The first command line argument GIVEN BY THE IDE'S RUN CONFIGURATION
     * should be "ide" (Case is ignored.), which this method will use to determine if it's running from the IDE.
     * <p>
     * It is also safer because you can give a fallback executable name in case getExecutableName() could not determine
     * it.
     * <p>
     * Ultimately, it is safer because if the executable could not be determined, it shows a message box telling the
     * user to start the program from the console.
     * <p>
     * You will probably never make use of this variant. It's meant to be a solution if all else seems to fail (e.g.
     * customer calls and you need a quick fix).
     * <p>
     * If this is used on a system other than Windows, a message box is shown telling the user to start the program from
     * the console. BECAUSE I DON'T KNOW HOW TO OPEN A CONSOLE ON OTHER SYSTEMS. SEE startExecutableInConsole();
     *
     * @param psvmArguments          The arguments given to the main method.
     * @param fallbackExecutableName Can be null. In case getExecutableName() can't determine the proper name, the
     *                               fallback is used.
     */
    public static void runYourselfInConsole(final String[] psvmArguments, final String fallbackExecutableName, final boolean stayOpenAfterEnd) {

        runYourselfInConsole(true, stayOpenAfterEnd, psvmArguments, fallbackExecutableName);
    }


    /**
     * see the other two methods
     */
    private static void runYourselfInConsole(final boolean useSaferApproach, final boolean stayOpenAfterEnd, final String[] psvmArguments, final String fallbackExecutableName) {

        String executableName = getExecutableName(fallbackExecutableName);

        if (useSaferApproach) {
            if (isRunFromIDE(psvmArguments)) {
                return;
            }
        } else {
            if (executableName == null) {
                // Running from IDE.
                return;
            }
        }

        if (isRunningInConsole()) {
            return;
        }

        if (executableName == null) {
            showFailMessageAndExit();
        }

        startExecutableInConsole(executableName, stayOpenAfterEnd);

        System.exit(0);
    }


    /**
     * Opens a console window and starts the Java executable there.
     * <p>
     * If this is used on a system other than Windows, a message box is shown telling the user to start the program from
     * the console. BECAUSE I DON'T KNOW HOW TO OPEN A CONSOLE ON OTHER SYSTEMS.
     *
     * @param executableName   the full file name of the executable (without path)
     * @param stayOpenAfterEnd If true (and if someone can figure out the necessary parameters for other systems than
     *                         Windows), the console will not close once the executable has terminated. This is useful
     *                         e.g. if you want to give some kind of bye bye message because you actually assumed that
     *                         people start the program from console manually.
     */
    private static void startExecutableInConsole(final String executableName, final boolean stayOpenAfterEnd) {

        String launchString = null;

        switch (getOsType()) {
        case UNDETERMINED:
            break;
        case WINDOWS:
            if (stayOpenAfterEnd) {
                launchString = "cmd /c start cmd /k java -jar \"" + executableName+"\""; // No, using /k directly here DOES NOT do the trick.
            } else {
                launchString = "cmd /c start java -jar \"" + executableName+"\"";
            }
            break;
        case LINUX:
            break;
        case MACOS:
            // launchString="/usr/bin/open -a Terminal /path/to/the/executable";
            break;
        }

        if (launchString == null) {
            showFailMessageAndExit();
        }

        try {
            Runtime.getRuntime().exec(launchString);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }


    /**
     * @param args the args as given to PSVM
     * @return whether the first command line argument was "ide" (ignoring case). Don't forget to change your IDE's run
     * configuration accordingly.
     */
    private static boolean isRunFromIDE(final String[] args) {

        return args != null && args.length > 0 && args[0].equalsIgnoreCase("ide");
    }


    /**
     * @return if System.console() is available. DOES NOT WORK properly from IDE, will return false then even though it
     * should be true. Use isRunFromIDE or other means additionally.
     */
    private static boolean isRunningInConsole() {

        return System.console() != null;
    }


    /**
     * @param fallbackExecutableName Can be null. In the very unlikely case this method can't determine the executable,
     *                               the fallback will also be checked. But if the fallback also doesn't exist AS A FILE
     *                               in the CURRENT path, null will be returned regardless, even if you're sure that
     *                               your fallback should be correct.
     * @return the name of the running jar file, OR NULL if it could not be determined (which should be a certainty
     * while in IDE, hence can be abused for determining that).
     */
    public static String getExecutableName(final String fallbackExecutableName) {

        // APPROACH 1 - THE ONE EVERYBODY ON STACKOVERFLOW IS REPEATING
        String executableNameFromClass = null;
        final CodeSource codeSource = AutoRunFromConsole.class.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource();
        if (codeSource == null) {
            System.err.println("UNEXPECTED: Main.class.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource() returned null");
        } else {
            final String path = codeSource.getLocation().getPath();
            if (path == null || path.isEmpty()) {
                System.err.println("UNEXPECTED: codeSource.getLocation().getPath() returned null or empty");
            } else {

                executableNameFromClass = new File(path).getName();

            }
        }


        // APPROACH 2 - QUERY SYSTEM PROPERTIES
        final Properties properties = System.getProperties();
        final String executableNameFromJavaClassPathProperty = properties.getProperty("java.class.path");
        final String executableNameFromSunJavaCommandProperty = properties.getProperty("sun.java.command");


        //        System.out.println("\n\nexecutableNameFromClass:\n" + executableNameFromClass);
        //        System.out.println("\n\nexecutableNameFromJavaClassPathProperty:\n" + executableNameFromJavaClassPathProperty);
        //        System.out.println("\n\nexecutableNameFromSunJavaCommandProperty:\n" + executableNameFromSunJavaCommandProperty);
        //        System.out.println("\n\nfallbackExecutableName:\n" + fallbackExecutableName);


        if (isThisProbablyTheExecutable(executableNameFromClass)) {
            return executableNameFromClass;
        }

        if (isThisProbablyTheExecutable(executableNameFromJavaClassPathProperty)) {
            return executableNameFromJavaClassPathProperty;
        }

        if (isThisProbablyTheExecutable(executableNameFromSunJavaCommandProperty)) {
            return executableNameFromSunJavaCommandProperty;
        }

        if (isThisProbablyTheExecutable(fallbackExecutableName)) {
            return fallbackExecutableName;
        }

        return null;
    }


    /**
     * @param candidateName suspected name of the running java executable
     * @return if name is not null, ends with ".jar" (Case is ignored.), and points to a FILE existing in the CURRENT
     * directory.
     */
    private static boolean isThisProbablyTheExecutable(final String candidateName) {

        if (candidateName == null || !candidateName.toLowerCase().endsWith(".jar")) {
            return false;
        }

        final File file = new File(candidateName);
        return file.exists() && file.isFile();
    }


    public static void main(final String[] args) {

        AutoRunFromConsole.runYourselfInConsole(true);
        printEnvironmentInfo();
    }


    /**
     * for debugging purposes
     */
    public static void printEnvironmentInfo() {


        System.out.println("\n\n\n\n-------------------------- System.getProperties() --------------------------");
        final Properties properties = System.getProperties();
        for (final Map.Entry<Object, Object> entry : properties.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println(entry);
        }

        System.out.println("\n\n\n\n----------------------------- System.getenv() ------------------------------");
        final Map<String, String> env = System.getenv();
        for (final Map.Entry<String, String> entry : env.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println(entry);
        }

        System.out.print("\n\n\n\n");
    }


}
  • Nice! However, I noticed a bug: If you run it by double clicking, you can't highlight text in the CMD window. – Android Dev May 27 '16 at 20:16
  • @AndroidDev Must be a problem on your end, works for me (just tested). I also wouldn't know how to change functionality of the CMD window like that (let alone via Java). – Dreamspace President May 29 '16 at 3:37

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