104

Normally when using Mockito I will do something like:

Mockito.when(myObject.myFunction(myParameter)).thenReturn(myResult);

Is it possible to do something along the lines of

myParameter.setProperty("value");
Mockito.when(myObject.myFunction(myParameter)).thenReturn("myResult");

myParameter.setProperty("otherValue");
Mockito.when(myObject.myFunction(myParameter)).thenReturn("otherResult");

So rather than when just using the parameter to determine the result. It is using a value of a property inside the parameter to determine the result.

So when the code is executed it behaves like so:

public void myTestMethod(MyParameter myParameter,MyObject myObject){
    myParameter.setProperty("value");
    System.out.println(myObject.myFunction(myParameter));// outputs myResult

    myParameter.setProperty("otherValue");
    System.out.println(myObject.myFunction(myParameter));// outputs otherResult
}

Here is the current solution, hopefully something better can be suggested.

private class MyObjectMatcher extends ArgumentMatcher<MyObject> {

    private final String compareValue;

    public ApplicationContextMatcher(String compareValue) {
        this.compareValue= compareValue;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean matches(Object argument) {
        MyObject item= (MyObject) argument;
        if(compareValue!= null){
            if (item != null) {
                return compareValue.equals(item.getMyParameter());
            }
        }else {
            return item == null || item.getMyParameter() == null;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

public void initMock(MyObject myObject){
    MyObjectMatcher valueMatcher = new MyObjectMatcher("value");
    MyObjectMatcher otherValueMatcher = new MyObjectMatcher("otherValue");
    Mockito.when(myObject.myFunction(Matchers.argThat(valueMatcher))).thenReturn("myResult");
    Mockito.when(myObject.myFunction(Matchers.argThat(otherValueMatcher))).thenReturn("otherResult");
}
7
  • 1
    It's unclear from your question what is the object to be mocked and what is the object under test. Mar 11, 2014 at 23:09
  • I have added an edit to demonstrate how I would like it to behave.
    – BevynQ
    Mar 12, 2014 at 0:21
  • Any way I try to read this, it seems to me that you're mocking the object you want to test. And unless you have compelling reasons to do so and you're doing it in such a way that it doesn't impede the object's original behaviour, that defeats the purpose of testing in the first place. Mar 12, 2014 at 0:58
  • Yeah, @ylabidi really has a point. What you want to do is possible, but it "feels" or "smells" a bit awkward. You should take a step back and ask if and why this is realy necessary. That is one of the reasons for testing: bad design usually leads to hard or awkward to test classes.
    – acdcjunior
    Mar 12, 2014 at 1:37
  • 1
    If you want something better to be suggested, you shouldn't have accepted an answer. Once you accept an answer, most people won't bother supplying a different one. For what it's worth, I believe there is a better way of doing this - I might post an answer later. Mar 12, 2014 at 7:04

5 Answers 5

131

In Java 8 it is even simpler than all of the above:

when(mockObject.myMethod(anyString()))
    .thenAnswer(invocation -> 
        invocation.getArgumentAt(0, String.class));
5
  • 7
    I like the idea of this but it seems incomplete? how does this differentiate between "value" and "otherValue" and return different answers in each case?
    – owenfi
    Apr 28, 2017 at 4:43
  • 18
    You can differentiate on different parameters by making the lambda bigger. Just add a if to it to select the write. It can be like this: invocation-> { String param = invocation.getArgumentAt(0, String.class); if (param.equals("value")) return "myResultOnValue"; if (param.equals("otherParam") return "myResultOnOtherValue" else return "MyDefaultResult";
    – Sven
    May 16, 2018 at 9:37
  • 6
    No need to define type anymore. This is easier: when(mockObject.myMethod (anyString() ) ).thenAnswer(invocation -> invocation.getArgument(0)); Sep 19, 2018 at 9:20
  • Sven and @MartijnHiemstra, your answers were very helpful to me. Thank you! I wasn't sure whether to edit this answer or create a new one. Feel free to copy anything useful from mine into yours, Sven, and I can delete mine. stackoverflow.com/a/64880543/631051 Nov 17, 2020 at 17:46
  • Nice concise update @Sven! FYI the method was getArgument for me, not getArgumentAt... Not sure why. Jul 25, 2023 at 21:34
74

Here's one way of doing it. This uses an Answer object to check the value of the property.

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class MyTestClass {
    private String theProperty;
    @Mock private MyClass mockObject;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        when(mockObject.myMethod(anyString())).thenAnswer(
            new Answer<String>(){
            @Override
            public String answer(InvocationOnMock invocation){
                if ("value".equals(theProperty)){
                    return "result";
                }
                else if("otherValue".equals(theProperty)) {
                    return "otherResult";
                }
                return theProperty;
            }});
    }
}

There's an alternative syntax, which I actually prefer, which will achieve exactly the same thing. Over to you which one of these you choose. This is just the setUp method - the rest of the test class should be the same as above.

@Before
public void setUp() {
    doAnswer(new Answer<String>(){
        @Override
        public String answer(InvocationOnMock invocation){
            if ("value".equals(theProperty)){
                return "result";
            }
            else if("otherValue".equals(theProperty)) {
                return "otherResult";
            }
            return theProperty;
        }}).when(mockObject).myMethod(anyString());
}
2
  • 3
    The solution you gave doesn't allow the mock the response based on different arguments of the mocked method. In this case, if we want to return a different response based on argument of mockObject.myMethod(String argument); if during run-time of test, if "argument" is "value" then return this and if "argument" is "othervalue" then return something else. Aug 27, 2020 at 15:19
  • 1
    To get the argument, you can do something like Object[] args = invocation.getArguments(); return (String) args[0];
    – autonomy
    Jul 30, 2021 at 17:27
8

Yes you can, using a custom argument matcher.

See the javadoc of Matchers for more details, and more specifically ArgumentMatcher.

2
  • 1
    I could use it in "when" method. Mockito.argThat returns null, thus causing exception. Aug 26, 2019 at 6:44
  • @TT. Someone fixed the links. I further updated them to always point to the latest version. Nov 17, 2020 at 17:51
6

Here is how it would look like in Kotlin with mockito-kotlin library.

mock<Resources> {
    on {
        mockObject.myMethod(any())
    } doAnswer {
        "Here is the value: ${it.arguments[0]}"
    }
}
1
  • Any idea how to do with with MockK?
    – SMBiggs
    Jan 20, 2023 at 0:01
3

You can do this with Mockito 3.6.0:

when(mockObject.myMethod(anyString()))
    .thenAnswer(invocation -> myStringMethod(invocation.getArgument(0)));

This answer is based on Sven's answer and Martijn Hiemstra's comment, with getArgumentAt() changed to getArgument().

1
  • In Mockito 3.6.0, you can also do this: when(mockObject.myMethod(anyString())) .thenAnswer(AdditionalAnswers.returnsFirstArg()); Feb 2, 2022 at 16:55

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