11

I have a javascript structure like below (nested arrays of objects)

var categoryGroups = [
    {
        Id: 1, Categories: [
            { Id: 1 },
            { Id: 2 }, 
        ]

    },
    {
        Id: 2, Categories: [
            { Id: 100 },
            { Id: 200 },
        ]

    }
]

I want to find a child Category object matching an Id, assuming the Category Id's are all unique.

I've got this below, but was wondering if there is a more concise way of doing it:

var category, categoryGroup, found = false;
for (i = 0; i < categoryGroups.length ; i++) {
    categoryGroup = categoryGroups[i];
    for (j = 0; j < categoryGroup.Categories.length; j++) {
        category = categoryGroup.Categories[j];
        if (category.Id === id) {
            found = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (found) break;
}
| |
  • 1
    I think there is a bug in your code. The condition if (category.Id === id) should actually be if (category.Id === categoryGroup.Id). Correct me if I am wrong – Raghu Mar 12 '14 at 6:22
  • I'd recommend using a library like lodash or underscore. More specifically, look at the find method of lodash. – Vahe Khachikyan Mar 12 '14 at 6:23
  • Lets say you want to find an item with id 100, do you want to get the output as { Id: 100 }? – thefourtheye Mar 12 '14 at 6:25
  • Does the nesting go further than two levelo? – Ja͢ck Mar 12 '14 at 6:25
11

Caveat: This uses a couple of Array.prototype functions that were only added in ECMAScript 5 and thus will not work with older browsers unless you polyfill them.

You can loop over all first-level objects in your array, and then filter the categories based on your condition and collect all matches in an array. Your final result will be the first element in the array of matches (no match found if array is empty).

var matches = [];
var needle = 100; // what to look for

arr.forEach(function(e) {
    matches = matches.concat(e.Categories.filter(function(c) {
        return (c.Id === needle);
    }));
});

console.log(matches[0] || "Not found");

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/b7ktf/1/

References:

Array.prototype.forEach
Array.prototype.concat
Array.prototype.filter

| |
5

Using flatMap in ES2019

const category = categoryGroups.flatMap(cg => cg.Categories).find(c => c.Id === categoryId);
| |
1

check the code in the fiddle

var categoryGroups = [
    {
        Id: 1, Categories: [
            { Id: 1 },
            { Id: 2 }, 
        ]

    },
    {
        Id: 2, Categories: [
            { Id: 100 },
            { Id: 200 },
        ]

    }
]
var id = 100;
var x = 'not found';
var category, categoryGroup, found = false;
for (i = 0; i < categoryGroups.length ; i++) {
    categoryGroup = categoryGroups[i];
    for (j = 0; j < categoryGroup.Categories.length; j++) {
        category = categoryGroup.Categories[j];
        if (category.Id == id) {
            var x = category.Id;
            found = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (found) break;
}
alert(x);

The above code checks if id = 100 is found in the array. If found will alert the value else alerts that its not found. value '100' has been hardcoded for the sake of demo

| |
  • Can you explain why you have set the id = 100? – Raghu Mar 12 '14 at 6:36
  • @Raghu : instead of an input i just hardcoded the value to be checked .. that has to be replaced by the value to b checked as per requirement – A J Mar 12 '14 at 6:38
  • got it. would have been great if you could create a function to make it mor e clearer. something like function getCategory(groups, id) – Raghu Mar 12 '14 at 6:39
  • @Raghu : Thanks .. but I just wanted to respond fast to the post. – A J Mar 12 '14 at 6:51
1

You could wrap it inside a function to get rid of the awkward break; syntax and you can load each element into a variable inside the for(;;) construct to shave off a few lines.

function subCategoryExists(groups, id)
{
  for (var i = 0, group; group = groups[i]; ++i) {
    for (var k = 0, category; category = group.Categories[k]; ++k) {
      if (category.Id == id) {
        return true;
      }
    }
  }
  return false;
}

var found = subCategoryExists(categoryGroups, 100);
| |
  • 1
    This piece of code will not work, if the nesting increases to multiple levels. Thus, it's not scalable. – Sahil Babbar Aug 23 '18 at 5:51
  • 1
    @SahilBabbar okay, but why did you only leave that comment on this answer? – Ja͢ck Aug 23 '18 at 5:52
  • @AnzilkhaN yeah, you may need a recursive approach if you want to traverse to unknown depths – Ja͢ck Oct 10 '19 at 6:38
1

Easy way using lodash library of NodeJS (assuming you are using NodeJS):

const _ = require('lodash');
let category ;
let categoryGroup = _.find(categoryGroups, (element)=>{
  category = _.find(element.Categories, {Id : 100});
  return category;
});

console.log(categoryGroup); // The category group which has the sub category you are looking for
console.log(category); // The exact category you are looking for
| |
1

Using reduce and recursion :

function nestedSearch(value) {
    return categoryGroups.reduce(function f(acc, val) {
        return (val.Id === value) ? val :
            (val.Categories && val.Categories.length) ? val.Categories.reduce(f, acc) : acc;
    });
}

> try on JSFiddle

| |
1

Using only Array.prototype.filter():

If you are sure that the id you are looking for exists, you can do:

var id = 200; // surely it exists
var category = arr.filter(g => g.Categories.filter(c => c.Id === id)[0])[0].Categories.filter(c => c.Id === id)[0];

If you are not sure that it exists:

var id = 201; // maybe it doesn't exist
var categoryGroup = arr.filter(e => e.Categories.filter(c => c.Id === id)[0])[0]; 
var category = categoryGroup ? categoryGroup.Categories.filter(c => c.Id === id)[0] : null;

jsfiddle

| |
0

You could use underscore:

var cat = _(categoryGroups).
  chain().
  pluck('Categories').
  flatten().
  findWhere({Id: 2}).
  value();

What I'm doing here is that I'm extracting all Categories values in a single array and then grepping for the correct categories.

EDIT: sorry, didn't get your question right the first time. As the comments suggest, you might not want to use underscore just for that, but that's how I would do it :)

| |
  • I think he wants to find by category id – Thank you Mar 12 '14 at 6:29
  • what if my project doesnt want to use underscore? His question is pretty clear he wants the optimization done in native javascript. – Raghu Mar 12 '14 at 6:29
  • @Raghu, yeah, i wouldn't add underscore for this one task unless you're already using it. – Thank you Mar 12 '14 at 6:38
  • Maybe underscore isn't a good fit for your project, but this is a great option for those who don't mind adding underscore. – xbonez Mar 12 '14 at 6:46
  • No, but it gives enough information that anyone familiar with JS can extend it to peek one level deeper. – xbonez Mar 12 '14 at 7:07
0

If you want to actually return the inner category (instead of just checking for it's presence) you can use reduce:

return categoryGroups.reduce((prev, curr) => {
    //for each group: if we already found the category, we return that. otherwise we try to find it within this group
    return prev || curr.Categories.find(category => category.Id === id);
}, undefined);

This short-circuits on the inner categories, and touches each categoryGroup once. It could be modified to short-cicuit on the categoryGroups as well.

Here's a JS Fiddle demonstration.

| |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.