1

I am doing some Http request processing using Spray. For a request I spin up an actor and send the payload to the actor for processing and after the actor is done working on the payload, I call context.stop(self) on the actor to wind the actor down.The idea is to prevent oversaturation of actors on the physical machine.

This is how I have things set up..

In httphandler.scala, I have the route set up as follows:

path("users"){
   get{
      requestContext => {
         val userWorker = actorRefFactory.actorOf(Props(new UserWorker(userservice,requestContext)))
        userWorker ! getusers //get user is a case object 
      }
   }
} ~ path("users"){
     post{
       entity(as[UserInfo]){
          requestContext => {
          userInfo => {
             val userWorker = actorRefFactory.actorOf(Props(new UserWorker(userservice,requestContext)))
             userWorker ! userInfo
           }
         }
       }
     }
 }

My UserWorker actor is defined as follows:

trait RouteServiceActor extends Actor{
  implicit val system = context.system
  import system.dispatcher
  def processRequest[responseModel:ToResponseMarshaller](requestContex:RequestContext)(processFunc: => responseModel):Unit = {
       Future{
         processFunc
       } onComplete {
          case Success(result) => {
            requestContext.complete(result)
          }
          case Failure(error) => requestContext.complete(error)
       }
  }
}

class UserWorker(userservice: UserServiceComponent#UserService,requestContext:RequestContext) extends RouteServiceActor{
 def receive = {
    case getusers => processRequest(requestContext){
         userservice.getAllUsers
    }
    context.stop(self)
  }
  case userInfo:UserInfo => {
    processRequest(requestContext){
         userservice.createUser(userInfo)
    }
    context.stop(self) 
 }  

}

My first question is, am I handling the request in a true asynchronous fashion? What are some of the pitfalls with my code?

My second question is how does the requestContext.complete work? Since the original request processing thread is no longer there, how does the requestContext send the result of the computation back to the client.

My third question is that since I am calling context.stop(self) after each of my partial methods, is it possible that I terminate the worker while it is in the midst of processing a different message.

What I mean is that while the Actor receives a message to process getusers, the same actor is done processing UserInfo and terminates the Actor before it can get to the "getusers" message. I am creating new actors upon every request, but is it possible that under the covers, the actorRefFactory provides a reference to a previously created actor, instead of a new one?

I am pretty confused by all the abstractions and it would be great if somebody could break it down for me.

Thanks

  • 1
    Besides your original questions on which @jrudolph has already answered : if you want to return some result from your actor to the HTTP user then you should use akka ask pattern: (get & path("users")) { complete { (userWorker ? getusers).mapTo[PutResultTypeHere] } } And in your UserWorker: case getusers => sender ! processRequest(...) – Sergiy Prydatchenko Mar 12 '14 at 12:06
12

1) Is the request handled asynchronously? Yes, it is. However, you don't gain much with your per-request actors if you immediately delegate the actual processing to a future. In this simple case a cleaner way would be to write your route just as

path("users") {
   get {
      complete(getUsers())
   }
}

def getUsers(): Future[Users] = // ... invoke userservice

Per-request-actors make more sense if you also want to make route-processing logic run in parallel or if handling the request has more complex requirements, e.g. if you need to query things from multiple service in parallel or need to keep per-request state while some background services are processing the request. See https://github.com/NET-A-PORTER/spray-actor-per-request for some information about this general topic.

2) How does requestContext.complete work? Behind the scenes it sends the HTTP response to the spray-can HTTP connection actor as a normal actor message "tell". So, basically the RequestContext just wraps an ActorRef to the HTTP connection which is safe to use concurrently.

3) Is it possible that "the worker" is terminated by context.stop(self)? I think there's some confusion about how things are scheduled behind the scenes. Of course, you are terminating the actor with context.stop but that just stops the actor but not any threads (as threads are managed completely independently from actor instances in Akka). As you didn't really make use of an actor's advantages, i.e. encapsulating and synchronizing access to mutable state, everything should work (but as said in 1) is needlessly complex for this use case). The akka documentation has lots of information about how actors, futures, dispatchers, and ExecutionContexts work together to make everything work.

  • Thanks for all the info. This was very helpful – sc_ray Mar 12 '14 at 18:24
2

In addition to jrudolph answer your spray routing structure shouldn't even compile, cause in your post branch you don't explicitly specify a requestContext. This structure can be simplified a bit to this:

def spawnWorker(implicit ctx: RequestContext): ActorRef = {
  actorRefFactory actorOf Props(new UserWorker(userservice, ctx))
}

lazy val route: Route = {
  path("users") { implicit ctx =>
    get {
      spawnWorker ! getUsers
    } ~
    (post & entity(as[UserInfo])) { 
      info => spawnWorker ! info 
    }
  }
}

The line info => spawnWorker ! info can be also simplified to spawnWorker ! _.

Also there is an important point concerning explicit ctx declaration and complete directive. If you explicitly declared ctx in your route, you can't use complete directive, you have to explicitly write ctx.complete(...), link on this issue

  • @Alexlv - I have mixed in the HttpService in the trait where I am defining the route. Shouldn't the requestContext be implicitly defined within the HttpService trait? – sc_ray Mar 12 '14 at 18:26
  • @sc_ray why is that? Take a look at HttService code, and how is that possible if requestContext can be obtained only from the request itself. Actually that what directives are for, take a look at Directive.apply method apply[L <: Hlist](r: L => Route): Route, where Route is RequestContext => Unit function. – 4lex1v Mar 12 '14 at 18:29
  • @Alexlv - This is interesting since my code does compile and the request handling is being done the way it is desired.Maybe the implicit is defined in one of my package imports. – sc_ray Mar 12 '14 at 20:28
  • I was talking about requestContext in new UserWorker(userservice,requestContext) in your post branch. The one you declaring in the get branch, shouldn't be visible in the post branch. Or am i missing something? – 4lex1v Mar 12 '14 at 20:32
  • Oh right..That's a miss. Thanks for pointing that out. I will edit it. I am just confused by who creates the RequestContext that's passed implicitly to the GET/POSTs. – sc_ray Mar 12 '14 at 20:40

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