36

I have a time format like: 12/16/2011 3:49:37 PM and I got this format by:

var newDate = new Date(timeFromat);
timeFormat = newDate.toLocaleString();

My actual format was GMT and I converted it to my bowers time by using the code above.

and I want to change it to 24h time format so I want this date to be changed like: 12/16/2011 15:49:37 and I want to do it in javascript.

Thats what I did

var firstPartOftimeFormat = timeFormat.substring(0,9);
var secondPartOftimeFormat = timeFormat.substring(10,20);

but it does not work when the date format is like: 3/16/2011. but the following part works.

var time = $("#starttime").val();
var hours = Number(secondPartOftimeFormat.match(/^(\d+)/)[1]);
var minutes = Number(secondPartOftimeFormat.match(/:(\d+)/)[1]);
var AMPM = secondPartOftimeFormat.match(/\s(.*)$/)[1];
if(AMPM == "PM" && hours<12) hours = hours+12;
if(AMPM == "AM" && hours==12) hours = hours-12;
var sHours = hours.toString();
var sMinutes = minutes.toString();
if(hours<10) sHours = "0" + sHours;
if(minutes<10) sMinutes = "0" + sMinutes;
alert(sHours + ":" + sMinutes);

Can you suggest other approach?

thanks

4
  • 1
    Various solutions to your problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/1056728/… Mar 12, 2014 at 9:49
  • 1
    Why are you using toLocaleString (which behaves differently for different locales) when you want a specific output format? I'd use a manual formatting here. Mar 12, 2014 at 9:49
  • Do not set any time format javascript Date by default return time in 24hr. Mar 12, 2014 at 9:55
  • Thanks, but my time format was GMT and I converted it to my browers time by var newDate = new Date(timeFromat); timeFormat = newDate.toLocaleString(); and the time is a past time. Mar 12, 2014 at 10:41

14 Answers 14

69

use dateObj.toLocaleString([locales[, options]])

Option 1 - Using locales

var date = new Date();
console.log(date.toLocaleString('en-GB'));

Option 2 - Using options

var options = { hour12: false };
console.log(date.toLocaleString('en-US', options));
3
  • 8
    Doesn't seem to work by now for some reason, it still returns time in 12 hours format.
    – red-o-alf
    Feb 16, 2018 at 12:12
  • 2
    it should be selected answer! Mar 20, 2019 at 17:04
  • I mistakenly first tried date.toLocaleString(options), which didn't work but didn't fail, but then changed it to date.toLocaleString('en-US', options), which did work.
    – hBrent
    Oct 8, 2021 at 22:13
20

hourCycle: 'h23' is Perfect

Thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/users/12425695/luis-serrano

new Date().toLocaleString('ru-RU', {
    timeZone: 'Europe/Moscow',
    hourCycle: 'h23',
    year: "numeric",
    month: "2-digit",
    day: "2-digit",
    hour: "2-digit",
    minute: "2-digit",
    second: "2-digit"
});
1
  • 3
    I think nowadays you use hour12, which is a boolean. So it would be something like: hour12: false, year: "numeric", month: "2-digit", etc etc etc
    – S. Dre
    Jun 30, 2022 at 7:45
12

Using some resources
Date/toLocaleDateStringMDN
Date/toLocaleTimeStringMDN

const lang = navigator.language || navigator.languages[0];
const date = new Date();
const date_locale = date.toLocaleDateString(lang, {
  day: 'numeric',
  month: 'short',
  year: 'numeric'
});
const time_locale = date.toLocaleTimeString(lang);

const formatted = `${date_locale} ${time_locale}`;
console.log(formatted)

above we deduce the current language from the Window's Navigator object.
In case lang ends up being undefined it's perfectly fine, defaults will be used.

To force a desired format, you can manually set lang to i.e: 'en-US', 'eu', 'en-GB', 'de-DE', 'hr-HR' etc...

Here's an example for time:

const date = new Date();
console.log(date.toLocaleTimeString('en-US')) // 12h
console.log(date.toLocaleTimeString('en-GB')) // 24h
console.log(date.toLocaleTimeString())        // Default

10

To get 24hrs format:

const date = new Date();
console.log(date.toLocaleTimeString([], {
    hourCycle: 'h23',
    hour: '2-digit',
    minute: '2-digit'
}));

5

You can use the below code to get 24hrs format

new Date("3/16/2011 3:49:37 PM").getHours() // 15
new Date("3/16/2011 3:49:37 PM").getMinutes() // 49
3

try this:

// British English uses day-month-year order and 24-hour time without AM/PM
console.log(date.toLocaleString('en-GB'));
// → "20/12/2012 03:00:00"

reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date/toLocaleString

0
2

Try this, Its Perfectly Working fine for me. It gives 24 hrs time format

var Date= new Date();

var TimeFormat= date.toLocaleString('en-GB');

Your answer will be Fri Dec 14 2018 18:00:00 GMT+0530 (India Standard Time)

2

new Date().toLocaleTimeString('fa-IR', { hour12: false, hour: '2-digit', minute: '2-digit' })

this is how it worked for me!

1

Try this, It's Working fine for me. It gives 24 hrs time format.

let time = new Date(new Date().toLocaleString('en-GB', { timeZone: 'Europe/London' }));
0

Try this

var d = new Date();
alert(d.getHours());
alert(d.getMinutes());
0

Try this function

<script type="text/javascript">
    <!--
    function displayTime() {
        var currentDate = new Date();
        var currentHour = currentDate.getHours();
        var currentMinute = currentDate.getMinutes();
        var currentSecond = currentDate.getSeconds();
        document.getElementById('timeDiv').innerHTML = 'Hour: ' + currentHour + ' Minute: ' + currentMinute + ' Second: ' + currentSecond;
    }

    window.onload = function() {
        window.setInterval('displayTime()', 1000);
    }
    // -->
</script>
1
  • Thanks, but my time format was GMT and I converted it to my browers time by var newDate = new Date(timeFromat); timeFormat = newDate.toLocaleString(); and the time is a past time. but your solution does not work. since When I apply getHours() in timeFormat = newDate.toLocaleString().getHourse(); it does not work Mar 12, 2014 at 10:39
0
console.log(Utilities.formatDate(new Date(),"GMT+3","dd.MM.yy k:mm:ss"));

try in format k:m:s insted of hh:mm:ss to

Utilities.formatDate

Tutorial Class SimpleDateFormat

0

const number = moment("02:00 PM", ["h:mm A"]).format("HH:mm"); console.log(number);

0

This worked for me. de-DE can be replaced with any language string like us-GB , nl-NL, etc.

function showTime() {
    const date = new Date();
    let time = date.toLocaleTimeString('de-DE', {
        hour12: false,
        hour: '2-digit',
        minute:'2-digit',
        second:'2-digit'
    });
    document.getElementById("MyClockDisplay").innerText = time;
    setTimeout(showTime, 1000);
}

showTime();

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