52

I want my .ejs files to have html syntax, however, it always opens the files as Plain Text.

In sublime you can choose "Open all with current extension as..." then choose your syntax.

sublime text3 syntax

I see that you can change the syntax in the left bottom cornersyntax change

How do you open files with a certain type with a specific syntax?

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5

Easy mode: include

If your language really is just HTML, you can set up a simple package to handle this.

Create a package called langugage-ejs and in grammars/ejs.cson you can include HTML as having the patterns you care about:

'fileTypes': [
  'ejs'
]

'name': 'Embedded JavaScript'

'patterns': [
  {
    'include': 'source.html'
  }
]

'scopeName': 'source.ejs'

language-ipynb certainly does this by extending JSON.

What about my template tags?

In reality though, you have template tags on top of HTML that you would want to make the editor recognize. The best example I can find is for erb (Embedded Ruby templates). It sources from HTML but also adds on other tags as shown in this snippet:

...
'patterns': [
  {
    'begin': '<%+#'
    'captures':
      '0':
        'name': 'punctuation.definition.comment.erb'
    'end': '%>'
    'name': 'comment.block.erb'
  }
  {
    'begin': '<%+(?!>)[-=]?'
    'captures':
      '0':
        'name': 'punctuation.section.embedded.ruby'
    'end': '-?%>'
    'name': 'source.ruby.rails.embedded.html'
    'patterns': [
      {
        'captures':
          '1':
            'name': 'punctuation.definition.comment.ruby'
        'match': '(#).*?(?=-?%>)'
        'name': 'comment.line.number-sign.ruby'
      }
      {
        'include': 'source.ruby.rails'
      }
    ]
  }
  {
    'include': 'text.html.basic'
  }
]
...
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  • package-generator:generate-language-package generates a language package skeleton that can then be easily extended. – Dmitry Zotikov Jan 6 '19 at 19:21
119

This is now in Atom core, you don't need that file-types package any more.

Where I work, we use .phl for a certain kind of PHP file. To tell Atom about this, edit config.cson like so:

core:
    customFileTypes:
      "text.html.php": [
        "phl"
      ]
    themes: [
// snip

You can find this file at ~/.atom/config.cson, or from the Settings window click the "Open Config Folder" button.

It's easy to get wrong, as evidenced by the many errors people made on the GitHub issue for the feature.

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  • 13
    This should be the top answer. – Arel Oct 6 '15 at 0:50
  • 13
    Where does the text.html.php identifier come from? Is there some reference or way to determine these for other file types? – Luke Oct 29 '15 at 7:58
  • 21
    The scope name of text.html.php comes from grammar list of Atom. You can see how it's pulled in Grammar List package source: github.com/atom/grammar-selector/blob/master/lib/… You can get a fresh list of grammars from the Atom console (cmd+shift+i or ctrl+shift+i) then paste this: atom.grammars.getGrammars().map(function (grammar) { console.log(grammar.scopeName); }); – spawnedc Jan 6 '16 at 9:46
  • 5
    Shortcut for Atom console is cmd+alt+i – BenRoe Feb 2 '16 at 22:22
  • 7
    The documentation links: Custom Language Recognition and Finding a language’s scope name are useful – Dave Andersen May 24 '16 at 18:29
6

Edit: since the time I wrote this answer, this functionality has been added to Atom core, see this answer for details.

file-types Atom package

(https://atom.io/packages/file-types)

It does exactly what the title question asks for: you can define new file extensions for existing languages with a simple edit of the config.cson file.

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5

For individual files you can use the Grammar Selector; Ctrl+Shift+L to set which language you're using on that file. Not the same as auto-detect but useful for those times when you're using a file that you don't want to set a default for.

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  • Thanks! This was impossible to find in the menu, quite ridiculously so. It never would strike me as Edit -> Select Grammer – Fractalf Mar 22 '16 at 7:23
  • You can also change it by clicking on the current syntax highlighting scheme in bottom right corner (next to encoding scheme). – Sachin Nov 16 '16 at 6:30
4

For example if you want to open all .jsx files with javascript syntax, you need to add this to your config.cson

"*":
  core:
    customFileTypes:
      "source.js": [
         "jsx"
      ]

This maps all .jsx files to open with js syntax.

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3

It looks likes there's a brand new package has been released for this. https://atom.io/packages/language-ejs.

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  • 1
    Thanks Dan! That wasn't there before. Looks like they're adding packages like gangbusters. What if I have another weird filetype that doesn't have a package yet? – NathanBrakk Mar 12 '14 at 20:35
  • 1
    "They" in this case is an external developer. You just have to create your own language pack. langugage-ejs looks like a direct port of a TextMate Bundle, which you can also create and publish. Sometimes it's as simple as including another language pack. Check out Creating a Package for more. – Kyle Kelley Mar 13 '14 at 4:55
  • I am using Version 0.120.0 (0.120.0) and I can no longer search for this package anymore. – Jason Kim Aug 6 '14 at 0:04
2

As Dave Andersen mentions in a buried comment, it is now possible to do this without any extra packages and it's documented here.

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  • 1
    +1 Simple solution with precise link - reference to finding the Language's Scope Name here – fidev Apr 18 '17 at 11:50

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