15

When I've made multistep forms in the past I would generally store the form data in the session before returning it to the view, that way the data persists if the user refreshes the page or clicks the browser's native back buttons.

Transferring my past logic to Laravel I built the following form consisting of three stages:

[Input -> Confirm -> Success]

Routes.php

Route::group(array('prefix' => 'account'), function(){
    Route::get('register', array(
        'before'  => 'guest',
        'as'      => 'account-create',
        'uses'    => 'AccountController@getCreate'
    ));

    Route::post('register', array(
        'before'  => 'guest|csrf',
        'as'      => 'account-create-post',
        'uses'    => 'AccountController@postCreate'
    ));

    Route::get('register/confirm', array(
        'before'  => 'guest',
        'as'      => 'account-create-confirm',
        'uses'    => 'AccountController@getCreateConfirm'
    ));

    Route::post('register/confirm', array(
        'before'  => 'guest|csrf',
        'as'      => 'account-create-confirm-post',
        'uses'    => 'AccountController@postCreateConfirm'
    ));

    Route::get('register/complete', array(
        'before'  => 'guest',
        'as'      => 'account-create-complete',
        'uses'    => 'AccountController@getCreateComplete'
    ));
});

AccountController.php

<?php
class AccountController extends BaseController {

  private $form_session = 'register_form';

  public function getCreate() 
  {
      if(Session::has($this->form_session)) 
      {
          // get forms session data
          $data = Session::get($this->form_session);

          // clear forms session data
          Session::forget($this->form_session);

          // load the form view /w the session data as input
          return View::make('account.create')->with('input',$data);
      }

      return View::make('account.create');
  }

  public function postCreate() 
  {
      // set the form input to the session
      Session::set($this->form_session, Input::all());

      $validation_rules = array(
          'email'         => 'required|max:50|email|unique:users',
          'password'      => 'required|max:60|min:6',
          'password_conf' => 'required|max:60|same:password'                    
      );

      $validator = Validator::make(Input::all(), $validation_rules);

      // get forms session data
      $data = Session::get($this->form_session);

      // Return back to form w/ validation errors & session data as input
      if($validator->fails()) {
        return  Redirect::back()->withErrors($validator);
      } 

      // redirect to the confirm step
      return Redirect::route('account-create-confirm');
  }

  public function getCreateConfirm() 
  {
      // prevent access without filling out step1
      if(!Session::has($this->form_session)) {
        return Redirect::route('account-create');
      }

      // get forms session data
      $data = Session::get($this->form_session);

      // retun the confirm view w/ session data as input
      return View::make('account.create-confirm')->with('input', $data);
  }

  public function postCreateConfirm() 
  {
      $data = Session::get($this->form_session);

      // insert into DB
      // send emails 
      // etc.

      // clear forms session data
      Session::forget($this->form_session);

      // redirect to the complete/success step
      return Redirect::route('account-create-complete');
  }

  public function getCreateComplete() {
      return View::make('account.create-complete');
  }
}

create.blade.php

<form action="{{ URL::route('account-create-post') }}" method="post">

    Email: <input type="text" name="email" value="{{ (isset($input['email'])) ? e($input['email']) : '' }}">
    @if($errors->has('email'))
        {{ $errors->first('email') }} 
    @endif
    <br />

    Password: <input type="text" name="password" value="">
    @if($errors->has('password'))
        {{ $errors->first('password') }} 
    @endif
    <br />

    Password Confirm: <input type="text" name="password_conf" value="">
    @if($errors->has('password_conf'))
        {{ $errors->first('password_conf') }} 
    @endif     
    <br />

    {{ Form::token() }}

    <input type="submit" value="Confirm">

</form>

create-confirm.blade.php

Email: {{ $input['email']; }}
Password: {{ $input['password']; }}

<form action="{{ URL::route('account-create-confirm-post') }}" method="post">
    {{ Form::token() }}
    <a href="{{ URL::previous() }}">return</a> 
    <input type="submit" name="submit_forward" value="Submit">
</form>

The above works fine, however I am wondering if this is the best way to approach multi-step forms in Laravel?

  • 4
    why not use multi step form in client side? just wondering.... ofcourse you can use sessions but in client side, it also can easily be done. – itachi Mar 13 '14 at 7:54
  • Never even considered using javascript. How would you suggest handling validation, serverside though ajax? – Jeemusu Mar 14 '14 at 1:20
  • Did you choose to use this way, or did you find a better approach for multi-step forms? – LoveAndHappiness Jun 2 '14 at 16:45
  • I am pretty much using this as is. The only changes I since made are to trim the controller down a bit by moving validation out to a validation service, and database/email functionality to a repository. – Jeemusu Jun 4 '14 at 4:10
7
+50

When I have created multi-part forms, I have always done it in a way so that the user can always come back and finish the form later, by making each form persist what they have to the database.

For instance


Step 1 - Account Creation

I would have the user create their authentication details at this step, create the user account (with password) here and also log the user in, redirecting to the dashboard. There I can do a check to see if the user has a profile and if they don't, redirect them to the profile creation form.

Step 2 - Profile Creation

Because we have an authenticated user, the profile creation form can save it's data to the currently logged in user. Subsequent sections follow the same process but check the existence of the previous step.


Your question seems to be about confirming whether a user wishes to create an account. What I would do in your situation would be, on the form you created to confirm the user account, I would keep the users data in hidden input fields.

Email: {{ $input['email'] }}
Password: {{ $input['password'] }}

<form action="{{ URL::route('account-create-confirm-post') }}" method="post">
    <input type="hidden" name="email" value="{{ $input['email'] }}">
    <input type="hidden" name="password" value="{{ $input['password'] }}">
    {{ Form::token() }}
    <a href="{{ URL::previous() }}">return</a> 
    <input type="submit" name="submit_forward" value="Submit">
</form>

Although displaying the users chosen password back to them on this page seems to be a bit superfluous when you ask them to confirm their password on the previous page, plus some users might question why their password is being shown in plaintext on the screen, especially if they are accessing the site from a public computer.


The third option I would suggest would be to create the user account and soft-delete it (Laravel 4.2 Docs / Laravel 5 Docs), returning the users account number to the new form:

Email: {{ $input['email'] }}
Password: {{ $input['password'] }}

<form action="{{ URL::route('account-create-confirm-post') }}" method="post">
    <input type="hidden" name="id" value="{{ $user_id }}">
    {{ Form::token() }}
    <a href="{{ URL::previous() }}">return</a> 
    <input type="submit" name="submit_forward" value="Submit">
</form>

then undo the soft-delete when the user confirms their account. This has the added bonus that you could track people trying to sign up multiple times for an account and not completing the process and see if there's a problem with your UX.


Conclusion

Of course, you could also still do it the way you always have with a session, all I have tried to do here is show you some other ways you can approach it, as with everything to do with the best way of doing something, this is a highly opinionated subject and is likely to get many opposing views on how it should be done. The best way to do it is the way that works best for you and your users... mainly your users.

  • Thank you for answering this question :) – Arlind Apr 25 '15 at 22:54
  • No problem, I'm glad it was helpful! – Andrew Willis Apr 25 '15 at 23:15
  • Thanks for the detailed answer. I think there are times when storing data in the database between requests has several advantages, although these mostly come down to analytics and marketing (seeing which users started a card process and never finished, etc). Doing it this way for a more simple form, i.e. a contact form would be overcomplicating the task at hand. You would also need to consider a cron job to remove data for those users who enter personal details and don't finish the form processes. – Jeemusu Apr 27 '15 at 6:29
  • Yeah you do raise valid points, I'd be more inclined to persist data in any kind of registration flow if only for the purpose of re-engagement, and as you say: analytics. If a lot of customers drop off at the same point then it's time to change your UX and attempt to re-engage them, they went through the trouble of getting to the point they are at so it makes sense. – Andrew Willis Apr 27 '15 at 7:05
  • @AndrewWillis Thank you for this answer. I have been trying to figure out a multi-step registration and was running into all kinds of problems. But after reading your answer it really came to me that it is much much better and easier to just use a simple registration process and after the user is logged in to basically finish it. – Cristian Sep 12 '15 at 1:03
1

There are two ways to do it (that i can think of). I prefer second one.

  1. Client side - everything can be handled by javascript. Basic validation (if field is email, if field has enough characters etc.) would be checked with javascript. After confirmation, AJAX request would go through server side validation and if anything went wrong you could highlight invalid inputs. "check if email is available" button (via AJAX) would be great too.
  2. Server side - pretty much what you did but I would move it to service - it would make it much cleaner.

 public function getCreate() {
      if ($this->formRememberService->hasData()) {
           return View::make('account.create')
                ->with('input', $this->formRememberService->getData());
      }
      return View::make('account.create');
 }

 public function postCreate() {
      $this->formRememberService->saveData(Input::all());
      // ...
 }

 public function postCreateConfirm() {
      // ...
      $this->formRememberService->clear();
      return Redirect::route('account-create-complete');
 }

Adding "forget me" action would be nice (especially if form requires more private data).

Why getCreate() has Session::forget()? If someone goes back to change something and accidently leaves your site his data will be lost.

  • If the user goes back, the session is cleared, but only after it has been processed by Laravel and output back into the view. You will see I put it into the $data variable before I clear it. Then when the form is submitted again, it is put back into the session. This was done to prevent form data from persisting when the users refreshes the page. The default action when a page is refreshed should be to reset the form (clear the contents). Thanks for your suggestion, I think wrapping it in a service would be a good idea. – Jeemusu Apr 23 '15 at 8:26
0

1st) Create a custom hidden field in the form containing a random md5 character set to submit it with the form... (it can be the timestamp, the user ip address, and country concatenated together as 3 md5 strings separated by whatever character , or #, so it can be working as a token of the form)

2nd) pass the hidden field into your controller and validate it after getting the user input from the form by generating the same values in your controller, encrypting these values as md5 too, then concatenate them all together, and compare the values that is coming from the user input form with the values you are generating in your controller.

3rd) Put the values of the form in your controller in a session then regenerate the session id every visit to every view the user is going to visit.

4th) update the timestamp in your session according the timestamp the user is visiting every page.

  • 1
    What if you have files too? – user2879055 Jan 29 at 22:01
  • You can encrypt any file using base64 and do not forget to add the header to it containing the MIME type of the file, then do the above steps as is. And this can be a perfect replacement to the regular file upload. – Mostafa A. Hamid Jan 30 at 17:29
-2

Just because you know Laravel, does not mean you have to do everything in Laravel.

Multi-step forms should never involve server-side magic. The best and easiest you can do is to hide certain steps with display:none; and switch to the next step using javascript toggling visibilities only.

  • "Multi-step forms should never involve server-side magic." Never is a very strong word. Why never? – Jeemusu Nov 29 '16 at 2:53
  • "Multi-step wizard pages" is basically a frontend concept. It's not so MVC to mess up your controller and model classes just because the frontend is changing. And of course my solution is 2 minutes of development, the other one is long hours... – Rápli András Nov 29 '16 at 9:10
  • 3
    @RápliAndrás And if javascript is disabled on the users browser then what would you suggest? – Birdy Jan 3 '17 at 12:46

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