Not sure if I am asking this the right way but essentially I am looking to "redeclare" or "reinstate" a virtual environment created in VirtualEnvWrapper.

I originally created the virtual environment and I was able to see it when I issued the workon command. However, since I was playing around with the file structure (I wanted to move all my Python files into a folder called Python and my Bootstrap files into a folder called Static) the environment no longer appears with the command workon

I thought about moving the bin folder etc. back up to the top level would fix it but this does not seem to be the case.

Yes.

Anatomy of virtualenvwrapper

The existing project has two parts:

  • the virtualenv, where python and the python libs are installed, and
  • the project directory where your code is (that uses the virtualenv).

Virtualenvwrapper adds a third part, the virtualenvwrapper hooks. These are mainly shell functions that are called at certain times in a project or virtualenvs life cycle. They live in a third directory - by default, they are installed to ~/.virtualenvs (at least that was true on my Debian system). The hooks include postactivate, which we will edit below, and a bunch of others such as premkproject, premkvirtualenv, etc. The following list of keywords gives you the flavour of the hooks: initialize, pre/post, mk/rm, project/virtualenv, activate/deactivate. virtualenvwrapper puts these scripts in $VIRTUALENVWRAPPER_HOOK_DIR, which defaults to $WORKON_HOME.

virtualenvwrapper assumes

  • all the virtualenvs are in one place ($WORKON_HOME) (defaults to ~/.virtualenvs) Let's say you have two virtualenvs, one called MYVENV and the other called MYOTHERVENV
  • all the project directories are in another place ($PROJECT_HOME). Let's say you have a project "is" in directory /home/me/where/my/proj that uses virtualenv MYVENV.

how to use workon to work on your pre-existing code and virtualenv

Here I'm assuming all your virtualenvs are in one place (in my case, they are all in /usr/local/virtualenv).

one-time operations

edit ~/.virtualenvs/postactivate to have

    case $env_name in
        MYVENV)
            cd /home/me/where/my/proj/is
            ;;
        MYOTHERVENV)
            cd /home/me/where/my/other/project/is2
            ;;
    esac

links

    for hk in get_env_details initialize postactivate postdeactivate \
            postmkproject postmkvirtualenv postrmproject postrmvirtualenv \
            preactivate predeactivate premkproject premkvirtualenv \
            prermproject prermvirtualenv; do \
        ln -s ~/.virtualenvs/$hk /usr/local/pythonenv/$hk; \
    done

any time you want to work on your project that uses MYVENV virtualenv

    WORKON_HOME=/usr/local/pythonenv workon MYVENV

Of course if all your virtualenvs are indeed in the same place, you can define WORKON_HOME in your .profile and you won't have to specify it on the command line every time.

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