9

How to check file owner in linux

i am trying to run this bash file

#!/bin/bash
uname2=$(ls -l $1 | awk '{print $3}');
if [ $uname2 == $USER ]
then echo owner
else echo no owner
fi

it gives error ==' unary operator expected. what is wrong? ubuntu server 10.04.

2
  • command works at home and doesn't work at work pc. Don't know why. Works without double quotes. Very strange... Mar 13, 2014 at 17:30
  • 3
    Don't parse the output of ls... Better to use stat -c %U file.dat...
    – twalberg
    Mar 13, 2014 at 18:47

4 Answers 4

21

Use = not == for comparison. The test(1) man page says:

STRING1 = STRING2
        the strings are equal

I'd also recommend using stat to find out the owner instead of some ls hacks. Some double quotes and an extra x would also be nice.

#!/bin/bash
uname2="$(stat -c '%U' "$1")"  # change this if not using Linux
if [ "x${uname2}" = "x${USER}" ]; then
    echo owner
else
    echo no owner
fi

If you're using GNU coreutils, you can replace stat -c with stat --format to make the script more readable. If you're using FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD or DragonFly you need to replace it with stat -f.

2
  • 8
    The extra "x" is only needed in, I think, the original Bourne shell, or at least in implementations that had trouble with empty strings. It is unnecessary today; [ "" = "$USER" ] will work in any POSIX-compatible shell, and especially in bash.
    – chepner
    Mar 13, 2014 at 19:51
  • 1
    under busybox use stat -c '%U' Nov 4, 2017 at 11:19
13

The -O file option tests if file exists and is owned by the effective user ID.

if [[ -O "$0" ]]; then
    echo "owner"
else
    echo "no owner"
fi
2

You forgot to put " next to variables.

uname2=$(ls -l $1 | awk '{print $3}');
if [ "$uname2" == "$USER" ]
then echo owner
else echo no owner
fi
1

Try running your script with bash -x and you can see exactly what's going on. I bet that one of your variables is empty. You can protect against this by quoting the variables, like this:

if [ "$uname2" == "$USER" ]

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