105

I want to find out how much time a certain function takes in my C++ program to execute on Linux. Afterwards, I want to make a speed comparison . I saw several time function but ended up with this from boost. Chrono:

process_user_cpu_clock, captures user-CPU time spent by the current process

Now, I am not clear if I use the above function, will I get the only time which CPU spent on that function?

Secondly, I could not find any example of using the above function. Can any one please help me how to use the above function?

P.S: Right now , I am using std::chrono::system_clock::now() to get time in seconds but this gives me different results due to different CPU load every time.

  • 2
    For Linux use: clock_gettime.. gcc defines other clocks as: typedef system_clock steady_clock; typedef system_clock high_resolution_clock; on Windows, use QueryPerformanceCounter. – Brandon Mar 13 '14 at 18:39
  • Isn't this question a duplicate of this one or do the scenarios make the solutions different? – northerner Jan 23 at 18:55
  • I have two implementations of a function and would like to find which performs better. – northerner Jan 23 at 18:55
209

It is a very easy-to-use method in C++11. You have to use std::chrono::high_resolution_clock from <chrono> header.

Use it like so:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

void function()
{
    long long number = 0;

    for( long long i = 0; i != 2000000; ++i )
    {
       number += 5;
    }
}

int main()
{
    auto t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    function();
    auto t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();

    auto duration = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::microseconds>( t2 - t1 ).count();

    std::cout << duration;
    return 0;
}

This will measure the duration of the function.

NOTE: You will not always get the same timing for a function. This is because the CPU of your machine can be less or more used by other processes running on your computer, just as your mind can be more or less concentrated when you solve a math exercise. In the human mind, we can remember the solution of a math problem, but for a computer the same process will always be something new; thus, as I said, you will not always get the same result!

  • When I use this function, on first run it gave me 118440535 microseconds and on second run of the same function it gave me 83221031 microseconds. Shouldn't the two time measurements be equal when I am measuring the duration of that function only ? – Xara Mar 13 '14 at 18:48
  • 1
    No. The processor of your computer can be used less or more. The high_resolution_clock will give you the physical and real time that your function takes to run. So, in your first run, your CPU was being used less than in the next run. By "used" I mean what other application work uses the CPU. – Victor Mar 13 '14 at 18:50
  • 1
    Yes, if you need the average of the time, that is a good way to get it. take three runs, and calculate the average. – Victor Mar 13 '14 at 18:54
  • 3
    Could you please post code without "using namespace" in general. It makes it easier to see what comes from where. – Snowman Mar 19 at 17:38
  • 2
    @Snowman your wish is my command – Kyle Jul 31 at 20:25
13

Here's a function that will measure the execution time of any function passed as argument:

#include <chrono>
#include <utility>

typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point TimeVar;

#define duration(a) std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(a).count()
#define timeNow() std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now()

template<typename F, typename... Args>
double funcTime(F func, Args&&... args){
    TimeVar t1=timeNow();
    func(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    return duration(timeNow()-t1);
}

Example usage:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

typedef std::string String;

//first test function doing something
int countCharInString(String s, char delim){
    int count=0;
    String::size_type pos = s.find_first_of(delim);
    while ((pos = s.find_first_of(delim, pos)) != String::npos){
        count++;pos++;
    }
    return count;
}

//second test function doing the same thing in different way
int countWithAlgorithm(String s, char delim){
    return std::count(s.begin(),s.end(),delim);
}


int main(){
    std::cout<<"norm: "<<funcTime(countCharInString,"precision=10",'=')<<"\n";
    std::cout<<"algo: "<<funcTime(countWithAlgorithm,"precision=10",'=');
    return 0;
}

Output:

norm: 15555
algo: 2976
  • 2
    @RestlessC0bra : It's implementaion defined, high_resolution_clock may be an alias of system_clock (wall clock), steady_clock or a third independent clock. See details here. For cpu clock, std::clock may be used – Jahid Jan 24 '17 at 11:39
  • 1
    Two macros and a global typedef - none of which safe a single keytroke - is certainly nothing I'd call elegant.Also passing a function object and perfectly forwarding the arguments separately is a bit of an overkill (and in the case of overloaded functions even inconvenient), when you can just require the timed code to be put in a lambda. But well, as long as passing arguments is optional. – MikeMB Mar 3 '17 at 12:30
  • 1
    And this is a justification for violating each and every guideline about the naming of macros? You don't prefix them, you don't use capital letters, you pick a very common name that has a high probability of colliding with some local symbol and most of all: Why are you using a macro at all (instead of a function)? And while we are at it: Why are you returning the duration as a double representing nanoseconds in the first place? We should probably agree that we disagree. My original opinion stands: "This is not what I'd call elegant code". – MikeMB May 8 '17 at 20:44
  • 1
    The problem is they are unscoped.What I'm worried about is that such macros end up in a header file that gets(maybe indirectly as part of a library) included in my code.If you want to have a taste of what happens if common names are used for macros,include windows.h in a non-trivial c++ project. Regarding assert first of all: "quod licet iovi non licet bovi" ;). Second, not all decision in the standard library (sometimes dating back decades) are actually considered a good idea by modern standards. There is a reason,why the c++ modules designer try very hard not to export macros by default. – MikeMB Jun 20 '17 at 8:44
  • 2
    @Jahid: Thanks. In that case consider my comments void and null. – MikeMB Jun 20 '17 at 9:00
9

simple program to find a function execution time taken.

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime> // time_t
#include <cstdio>

void function()
{
     for(long int i=0;i<1000000000;i++)
     {
        // do nothing
     }
}

int main()
{

time_t begin,end; // time_t is a datatype to store time values.

time (&begin); // note time before execution
function();
time (&end); // note time after execution

double difference = difftime (end,begin);
printf ("time taken for function() %.2lf seconds.\n", difference );

return 0;
}
  • 4
    it's very inaccurate, shows only seconds, but no milliseconds – user25 May 17 '18 at 19:59
4

In Scott Meyers book I found an example of universal generic lambda expression that can be used to measure function execution time. (C++14)

auto timeFuncInvocation = 
    [](auto&& func, auto&&... params) {
        // get time before function invocation
        const auto& start = high_resolution_clock::now();
        // function invocation using perfect forwarding
        std::forward<decltype(func)>(func)(std::forward<decltype(params)>(params)...);
        // get time after function invocation
        const auto& stop = high_resolution_clock::now();
        return stop - start;
     };

The problem is that you are measure only one execution so the results can be very differ. To get a reliable result you should measure a large number of execution. According to Andrei Alexandrescu lecture at code::dive 2015 conference - Writing Fast Code I:

Measured time: tm = t + tq + tn + to

where:

tm - measured (observed) time

t - the actual time of interest

tq - time added by quantization noise

tn - time added by various sources of noise

to - overhead time (measuring, looping, calling functions)

According to what he said later in the lecture, you should take a minimum of this large number of execution as your result. I encourage you to look at the lecture in which he explains why.

Also there is a very good library from google - https://github.com/google/benchmark. This library is very simple to use and powerful. You can checkout some lectures of Chandler Carruth on youtube where he is using this library in practice. For example CppCon 2017: Chandler Carruth “Going Nowhere Faster”;

Example usage:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <vector>
auto timeFuncInvocation = 
    [](auto&& func, auto&&... params) {
        // get time before function invocation
        const auto& start = high_resolution_clock::now();
        // function invocation using perfect forwarding
        for(auto i = 0; i < 100000/*largeNumber*/; ++i) {
            std::forward<decltype(func)>(func)(std::forward<decltype(params)>(params)...);
        }
        // get time after function invocation
        const auto& stop = high_resolution_clock::now();
        return (stop - start)/100000/*largeNumber*/;
     };

void f(std::vector<int>& vec) {
    vec.push_back(1);
}

void f2(std::vector<int>& vec) {
    vec.emplace_back(1);
}
int main()
{
    std::vector<int> vec;
    std::vector<int> vec2;
    std::cout << timeFuncInvocation(f, vec).count() << std::endl;
    std::cout << timeFuncInvocation(f2, vec2).count() << std::endl;
    std::vector<int> vec3;
    vec3.reserve(100000);
    std::vector<int> vec4;
    vec4.reserve(100000);
    std::cout << timeFuncInvocation(f, vec3).count() << std::endl;
    std::cout << timeFuncInvocation(f2, vec4).count() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

EDIT: Ofcourse you always need to remember that your compiler can optimize something out or not. Tools like perf can be useful in such cases.

  • Interesting -- what's the benefit of using a lambda here over a function template? – user48956 Feb 11 at 19:23
  • 1
    Main difference would be that it is a callable object but indeed you can get something very similar with variadic template and std::result_of_t. – Krzysztof Sommerfeld Feb 14 at 10:11
3

Easy way for older C++, or C:

#include <time.h> // includes clock_t and CLOCKS_PER_SEC

int main() {

    clock_t start, end;

    start = clock();
    // ...code to measure...
    end = clock();

    double duration_sec = double(end-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    return 0;
}

Timing precision in seconds is 1.0/CLOCKS_PER_SEC

  • 1
    This is not portable. It measures processor time on Linux, and clock time on Windows. – BugSquasher Mar 30 at 15:11
2
  • It is a very easy to use method in C++11.
  • We can use std::chrono::high_resolution_clock from header
  • We can write a method to print the method execution time in a much readable form.

For example, to find the all the prime numbers between 1 and 100 million, it takes approximately 1 minute and 40 seconds. So the execution time get printed as:

Execution Time: 1 Minutes, 40 Seconds, 715 MicroSeconds, 715000 NanoSeconds

The code is here:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

using namespace std;
using namespace std::chrono;

typedef high_resolution_clock Clock;
typedef Clock::time_point ClockTime;

void findPrime(long n, string file);
void printExecutionTime(ClockTime start_time, ClockTime end_time);

int main()
{
    long n = long(1E+8);  // N = 100 million

    ClockTime start_time = Clock::now();

    // Write all the prime numbers from 1 to N to the file "prime.txt"
    findPrime(n, "C:\\prime.txt"); 

    ClockTime end_time = Clock::now();

    printExecutionTime(start_time, end_time);
}

void printExecutionTime(ClockTime start_time, ClockTime end_time)
{
    auto execution_time_ns = duration_cast<nanoseconds>(end_time - start_time).count();
    auto execution_time_ms = duration_cast<microseconds>(end_time - start_time).count();
    auto execution_time_sec = duration_cast<seconds>(end_time - start_time).count();
    auto execution_time_min = duration_cast<minutes>(end_time - start_time).count();
    auto execution_time_hour = duration_cast<hours>(end_time - start_time).count();

    cout << "\nExecution Time: ";
    if(execution_time_hour > 0)
    cout << "" << execution_time_hour << " Hours, ";
    if(execution_time_min > 0)
    cout << "" << execution_time_min % 60 << " Minutes, ";
    if(execution_time_sec > 0)
    cout << "" << execution_time_sec % 60 << " Seconds, ";
    if(execution_time_ms > 0)
    cout << "" << execution_time_ms % long(1E+3) << " MicroSeconds, ";
    if(execution_time_ns > 0)
    cout << "" << execution_time_ns % long(1E+6) << " NanoSeconds, ";
}
0

Here is an excellent header only class template to measure the elapsed time of a function or any code block:

#ifndef EXECUTION_TIMER_H
#define EXECUTION_TIMER_H

template<class Resolution = std::chrono::milliseconds>
class ExecutionTimer {
public:
    using Clock = std::conditional_t<std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::is_steady,
                                     std::chrono::high_resolution_clock,
                                     std::chrono::steady_clock>;
private:
    const Clock::time_point mStart = Clock::now();

public:
    ExecutionTimer() = default;
    ~ExecutionTimer() {
        const auto end = Clock::now();
        std::ostringstream strStream;
        strStream << "Destructor Elapsed: "
                  << std::chrono::duration_cast<Resolution>( end - mStart ).count()
                  << std::endl;
        std::cout << strStream.str() << std::endl;
    }    

    inline void stop() {
        const auto end = Clock::now();
        std::ostringstream strStream;
        strStream << "Stop Elapsed: "
                  << std::chrono::duration_cast<Resolution>(end - mStart).count()
                  << std::endl;
        std::cout << strStream.str() << std::endl;
    }

}; // ExecutionTimer

#endif // EXECUTION_TIMER_H

Here are some uses of it:

int main() {
    { // empty scope to display ExecutionTimer's destructor's message
         // displayed in milliseconds
         ExecutionTimer<std::chrono::milliseconds> timer;

         // function or code block here

         timer.stop();

    } 

    { // same as above
        ExecutionTimer<std::chrono::microseconds> timer;

        // code block here...

        timer.stop();
    }

    {  // same as above
       ExecutionTimer<std::chrono::nanoseconds> timer;

       // code block here...

       timer.stop();

    }

    {  // same as above
       ExecutionTimer<std::chrono::seconds> timer;

       // code block here...

       timer.stop();

    }              

    return 0;
}

Since the class is a template we can specify real easily in how we want our time to be measured & displayed. This is a very handy utility class template for doing bench marking and is very easy to use.

  • Personally, the stop() member function isn't needed because the destructor stops the timer for you. – Casey Feb 22 '18 at 13:59
  • @Casey The design of the class doesn't necessarily need the stop function, however it is there for a specific reason. The default construct when creating the object before your test code starts the timer. Then after your test code you explicitly use the timer object and call its stop method. You have to invoke it manually when you want to stop the timer. The class doesn't take any parameters. Also if you used this class just as I've shown you will see that there is a minimal elapse of time between the call to obj.stop and its destructor. – Francis Cugler Feb 23 '18 at 3:15
  • @Casey ... This also allows to have multiple timer objects within the same scope, not that one would really need it, but just another viable option. – Francis Cugler Feb 23 '18 at 3:17
  • This example cannot be compiled in the presented form. The error is related to "no match for operator<< ..."! – Celdor Apr 16 at 14:52
  • @Celdor do you have to appropriate includes; such as <chrono>? – Francis Cugler Apr 16 at 20:57
0

I recommend using steady_clock which is guarunteed to be monotonic, unlike high_resolution_clock.

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>

using namespace std;

unsigned int stopwatch()
{
    static auto start_time = chrono::steady_clock::now();

    auto end_time = chrono::steady_clock::now();
    auto delta    = chrono::duration_cast<chrono::microseconds>(end_time - start_time);

    start_time = end_time;

    return delta.count();
}

int main() {
  stopwatch(); //Start stopwatch
  std::cout << "Hello World!\n";
  cout << stopwatch() << endl; //Time to execute last line
  for (int i=0; i<1000000; i++)
      string s = "ASDFAD";
  cout << stopwatch() << endl; //Time to execute for loop
}

Output:

Hello World!
62
163514

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