14

Is there a way, lib, or something in python that I can set value in list at an index that does not exist? Something like runtime index creation at list:

l = []
l[3] = 'foo'
# [None, None, None, 'foo']

And more further, with multi dimensional lists:

l = []
l[0][2] = 'bar'
# [[None, None, 'bar']]

Or with an existing one:

l = [['xx']]
l[0][1] = 'yy'
# [['xx', 'yy']]
  • If you're looking for something like autovivification, def tree(): return defaultdict(tree) will give you a dict that recursively makes new dicts when you request a nonexistent entry. – user2357112 supports Monica Mar 13 '14 at 19:49
  • Is there a reason you can't just use a dict? The only difference I see is that the lower indices are initialized to None. – Ron Mar 13 '14 at 19:59
11

There isn't a built-in, but it's easy enough to implement:

class FillList(list):
    def __setitem__(self, index, value):
        try:
            super().__setitem__(index, value)
        except IndexError:
            for _ in range(index-len(self)+1):
                self.append(None)
            super().__setitem__(index, value)

Or, if you need to change existing vanilla lists:

def set_list(l, i, v):
      try:
          l[i] = v
      except IndexError:
          for _ in range(i-len(l)+1):
              l.append(None)
          l[i] = v
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    multidimensions are difficult... let's say you do something where you want l[i] to be None if it doesn't exist - then l[3] = 'three' creates [None, None, None, 'three']. But let's say you then do l[0][3] - when the lookup for l[0] is done, the code doesn't know that you want to dereference it again, so it doesn't know to change the None to a dict, and it fails. Any multidimensional solution has the problem that it can't read minds... – Corley Brigman Mar 13 '14 at 20:16
2

If you really want the syntax in your question, defaultdict is probably the best way to get it:

from collections import defaultdict
def rec_dd(): 
    return defaultdict(rec_dd)

l = rec_dd()
l[3] = 'foo'

print l
{3: 'foo'}

l = rec_dd()
l[0][2] = 'xx'
l[1][0] = 'yy'
print l
<long output because of defaultdict, but essentially)
{0: {2: 'xx'}, 1: {0: 'yy'}}

It isn't exactly a 'list of lists' but it works more or less like one.

You really need to specify the use case though... the above has some advantages (you can access indices without checking whether they exist first), and some disadvantages - for example, l[2] in a normal dict will return a KeyError, but in defaultdict it just creates a blank defaultdict, adds it, and then returns it.

Other possible implementations to support different syntactic sugars could involve custom classes etc, and will have other tradeoffs.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is nice, but i need an array. Could you show how to transform it in one ? – user1538560 Mar 13 '14 at 20:08
  • If you need an array... you should use an array. However, you can do things like for index in range(10): do_something(l[index]) after it's populated - i.e. even though it doesn't look like an array, it acts like an array for most uses. you will need to define what it means if l[i] doesn't exist though - this will create a empty defaultdict object, but likely if you're seeing that, there's some bug in your algorithm already. – Corley Brigman Mar 13 '14 at 20:11
2

Not foolproof, but it seems like the easiest way to do this is to initialize a list much larger than you will need, i.e.

l = [None for i in some_large_number]
l[3] = 'foo'
# [None, None, None, 'foo', None, None None ... ]
| improve this answer | |
1

You cannot create a list with gaps. You could use a dict or this quick little guy:

def set_list(i,v):
    l = []
    x = 0
    while x < i:
        l.append(None)
        x += 1
    l.append(v)
    return l

print set_list(3, 'foo')
>>> [None, None, None, 'foo']
| improve this answer | |
  • But if I want to add to an existing list? like: set_list(['a', 'b'], 3, 'foo') # ['a', 'b', None, 'foo'] – user1538560 Mar 13 '14 at 19:39

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