1275

We all know you can't do the following because of ConcurrentModificationException:

for (Object i : l) {
    if (condition(i)) {
        l.remove(i);
    }
}

But this apparently works sometimes, but not always. Here's some specific code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Collection<Integer> l = new ArrayList<>();

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        l.add(4);
        l.add(5);
        l.add(6);
    }

    for (int i : l) {
        if (i == 5) {
            l.remove(i);
        }
    }

    System.out.println(l);
}

This, of course, results in:

Exception in thread "main" java.util.ConcurrentModificationException

Even though multiple threads aren't doing it. Anyway.

What's the best solution to this problem? How can I remove an item from the collection in a loop without throwing this exception?

I'm also using an arbitrary Collection here, not necessarily an ArrayList, so you can't rely on get.

1

30 Answers 30

1657

Iterator.remove() is safe, you can use it like this:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

// This is a clever way to create the iterator and call iterator.hasNext() like
// you would do in a while-loop. It would be the same as doing:
//     Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator();
//     while (iterator.hasNext()) {
for (Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator(); iterator.hasNext();) {
    String string = iterator.next();
    if (string.isEmpty()) {
        // Remove the current element from the iterator and the list.
        iterator.remove();
    }
}

Note that Iterator.remove() is the only safe way to modify a collection during iteration; the behavior is unspecified if the underlying collection is modified in any other way while the iteration is in progress.

Source: docs.oracle > The Collection Interface


And similarly, if you have a ListIterator and want to add items, you can use ListIterator#add, for the same reason you can use Iterator#remove — it's designed to allow it.


In your case you tried to remove from a list, but the same restriction applies if trying to put into a Map while iterating its content.

16
  • 20
    What if you want to remove an element other than the element returned in the current iteration?
    – Eugen
    Apr 22, 2013 at 9:51
  • 2
    You have to use the .remove in the iterator and that is only able to remove the current element, so no :)
    – Bill K
    Apr 22, 2013 at 18:00
  • 1
    Be aware that this is slower compared to using ConcurrentLinkedDeque or CopyOnWriteArrayList (at least in my case)
    – Dan
    Oct 24, 2014 at 1:43
  • 1
    Is it not possible to put the iterator.next() call in the for-loop? If not, can someone explain why?
    – Blake
    Apr 12, 2016 at 13:22
  • 1
    @GonenI It's implemented for all iterators from collections which aren't immutable. List.add is "optional" in that same sense too, but you wouldn't say it's "unsafe" to add to a list.
    – Radiodef
    Aug 9, 2018 at 0:33
355

This works:

Iterator<Integer> iter = l.iterator();
while (iter.hasNext()) {
    if (iter.next() == 5) {
        iter.remove();
    }
}

I assumed that since a foreach loop is syntactic sugar for iterating, using an iterator wouldn't help... but it gives you this .remove() functionality.

2
  • 48
    foreach loop is syntactic sugar for iterating. However as you pointed out, you need to call remove on the iterator - which foreach doesn't give you access to. Hence the reason why you can't remove in a foreach loop (even though you are actually using an iterator under the hood)
    – madlep
    Oct 21, 2008 at 23:30
  • 36
    +1 for example code to use iter.remove() in context, which Bill K's answer does not [directly] have.
    – Eddified
    Oct 3, 2012 at 17:01
236

With Java 8 you can use the new removeIf method. Applied to your example:

Collection<Integer> coll = new ArrayList<>();
//populate

coll.removeIf(i -> i == 5);
6
  • 3
    Ooooo! I was hoping something in Java 8 or 9 might help. This still seems rather verbose to me, but I still like it. Sep 23, 2015 at 18:25
  • Is implementing equals() recommended in this case too? Dec 11, 2015 at 8:57
  • by the way removeIf uses Iterator and while loop. You can see it at java 8 java.util.Collection.java Oct 31, 2016 at 14:10
  • 3
    @omerhakanbilici Some implementations like ArrayList override it for performance reasons. The one you are referring to is only the default implementation.
    – Didier L
    Mar 31, 2017 at 8:33
  • @AnmolGupta: No, equals is not used at all here, so it doesn't have to be implemented. (But of course, if you use equals in your test then it has to be implemented the way you want it.)
    – Lii
    Jan 3, 2019 at 10:31
44

Since the question has been already answered i.e. the best way is to use the remove method of the iterator object, I would go into the specifics of the place where the error "java.util.ConcurrentModificationException" is thrown.

Every collection class has a private class which implements the Iterator interface and provides methods like next(), remove() and hasNext().

The code for next looks something like this...

public E next() {
    checkForComodification();
    try {
        E next = get(cursor);
        lastRet = cursor++;
        return next;
    } catch(IndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
        checkForComodification();
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    }
}

Here the method checkForComodification is implemented as

final void checkForComodification() {
    if (modCount != expectedModCount)
        throw new ConcurrentModificationException();
}

So, as you can see, if you explicitly try to remove an element from the collection. It results in modCount getting different from expectedModCount, resulting in the exception ConcurrentModificationException.

1
  • 1
    Very interesting. Thank you! I often don't call remove() myself, I instead favour clearing the collection after iterating through it. Not to say that's a good pattern, just what I've been doing lately. Sep 23, 2015 at 18:27
28

You can either use the iterator directly like you mentioned, or else keep a second collection and add each item you want to remove to the new collection, then removeAll at the end. This allows you to keep using the type-safety of the for-each loop at the cost of increased memory use and cpu time (shouldn't be a huge problem unless you have really, really big lists or a really old computer)

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Collection<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    Collection<Integer> itemsToRemove = new ArrayList<>();
    for (int i=0; i < 10; i++) {
        l.add(Integer.of(4));
        l.add(Integer.of(5));
        l.add(Integer.of(6));
    }
    for (Integer i : l)
    {
        if (i.intValue() == 5) {
            itemsToRemove.add(i);
        }
    }

    l.removeAll(itemsToRemove);
    System.out.println(l);
}
6
  • 7
    this is what i normally do, but the explicit iterator is a more elgant solution i feel.
    – Claudiu
    Oct 21, 2008 at 23:51
  • 1
    Fair enough, as long as you aren't doing anything else with the iterator - having it exposed makes it easier to do things like call .next() twice per loop etc. Not a huge problem, but can cause issues if you are doing anything more complicated than just running through a list to delete entries.
    – RodeoClown
    Oct 21, 2008 at 23:58
  • @RodeoClown: in the original question, Claudiu is removing from the Collection, not the iterator.
    – matt b
    Oct 22, 2008 at 14:29
  • 1
    Removing from the iterator removes from the underlying collection... but what I was saying in the last comment is that if you are doing anything more complicated than just looking for deletes in the loop (like processing correct data) using the iterator can make some errors easier to make.
    – RodeoClown
    Oct 22, 2008 at 18:35
  • If it is a simple delete values that aren't needed and the loop is only doing that one thing, using the iterator directly and calling .remove() is absolutely fine.
    – RodeoClown
    Oct 22, 2008 at 18:36
19

In such cases a common trick is (was?) to go backwards:

for(int i = l.size() - 1; i >= 0; i --) {
  if (l.get(i) == 5) {
    l.remove(i);
  }
}

That said, I'm more than happy that you have better ways in Java 8, e.g. removeIf or filter on streams.

4
  • 2
    This is a good trick. But it wouldn't work on non-indexed collections like sets, and it'd be really slow on say linked lists.
    – Claudiu
    Aug 29, 2014 at 16:12
  • @Claudiu Yes, this is definitely just for ArrayLists or similar collections.
    – Landei
    Aug 30, 2014 at 15:47
  • I'm using an ArrayList, this worked perfectly, thanks. Feb 21, 2018 at 6:30
  • 2
    indexes are great. If it's so common why don't you use for(int i = l.size(); i-->0;) {?
    – John
    Apr 27, 2018 at 20:20
17

Same answer as Claudius with a for loop:

for (Iterator<Object> it = objects.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
    Object object = it.next();
    if (test) {
        it.remove();
    }
}
12

With Eclipse Collections, the method removeIf defined on MutableCollection will work:

MutableList<Integer> list = Lists.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
list.removeIf(Predicates.lessThan(3));
Assert.assertEquals(Lists.mutable.of(3, 4, 5), list);

With Java 8 Lambda syntax this can be written as follows:

MutableList<Integer> list = Lists.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
list.removeIf(Predicates.cast(integer -> integer < 3));
Assert.assertEquals(Lists.mutable.of(3, 4, 5), list);

The call to Predicates.cast() is necessary here because a default removeIf method was added on the java.util.Collection interface in Java 8.

Note: I am a committer for Eclipse Collections.

11

Make a copy of existing list and iterate over new copy.

for (String str : new ArrayList<String>(listOfStr))     
{
    listOfStr.remove(/* object reference or index */);
}
5
  • 19
    Making a copy sounds like a waste of resources.
    – Antzi
    Aug 21, 2013 at 12:35
  • 3
    @Antzi That depends on the size of the list and the density of the objects within. Still a valuable and valid solution.
    – mre
    May 4, 2016 at 14:14
  • I have been using this method. It takes a bit more resource, but much more flexible and clear.
    – Tao Zhang
    Feb 7, 2019 at 23:34
  • This is a good solution when you are not intending to remove objects inside the loop itself, but they are rather "randomly" removed from other threads (e.g. network operations updating data). If you find yourself doing these copies a lot there is even a java implementation doing exactly this: docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/…
    – A1m
    Oct 26, 2019 at 3:15
  • Making a copy of the list is what they are typically doing with listeners on Android. It's a valid solution for small lists.
    – Slion
    Feb 8, 2021 at 16:50
10

People are asserting one can't remove from a Collection being iterated by a foreach loop. I just wanted to point out that is technically incorrect and describe exactly (I know the OP's question is so advanced as to obviate knowing this) the code behind that assumption:

for (TouchableObj obj : untouchedSet) {  // <--- This is where ConcurrentModificationException strikes
    if (obj.isTouched()) {
        untouchedSet.remove(obj);
        touchedSt.add(obj);
        break;  // this is key to avoiding returning to the foreach
    }
}

It isn't that you can't remove from the iterated Colletion rather that you can't then continue iteration once you do. Hence the break in the code above.

Apologies if this answer is a somewhat specialist use-case and more suited to the original thread I arrived here from, that one is marked as a duplicate (despite this thread appearing more nuanced) of this and locked.

10

With a traditional for loop

ArrayList<String> myArray = new ArrayList<>();

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.size(); ) {
    String text = myArray.get(i);
    if (someCondition(text))
        myArray.remove(i);
    else
        i++;   
}
3
  • 1
    Ah, so its really just the enhanced-for-loop that throws the Exception.
    – cellepo
    Dec 20, 2018 at 0:11
  • FWIW - same code would still work after modified to increment i++ in the loop guard rather than within loop body.
    – cellepo
    Dec 20, 2018 at 0:11
  • Correction ^: That is if the i++ incrementing were not conditional - I see now that's why you do it in the body :)
    – cellepo
    Dec 20, 2018 at 0:23
4

ConcurrentHashMap or ConcurrentLinkedQueue or ConcurrentSkipListMap may be another option, because they will never throw any ConcurrentModificationException, even if you remove or add item.

2
  • Yep, and note that those are all in java.util.concurrent package. Some other similar/common-use-case classes from that package are CopyOnWriteArrayList & CopyOnWriteArraySet [but not limited to those].
    – cellepo
    Nov 19, 2018 at 3:52
  • Actually, I just learned that although those data structure Objects avoid ConcurrentModificationException, using them in an enhanced-for-loop can still cause indexing problems (i.e: still skipping elements, or IndexOutOfBoundsException...)
    – cellepo
    Dec 20, 2018 at 1:13
3

Another way is to use a copy of your arrayList just for iteration:

List<Object> l = ...
    
List<Object> iterationList = ImmutableList.copyOf(l);
    
for (Object curr : iterationList) {
    if (condition(curr)) {
        l.remove(curr);
    }
}
2
  • 2
    Note: i isn't a index but instead the object. Maybe calling it obj would be more fitting. Mar 29, 2019 at 12:05
  • 1
    Was already suggested above back in 2012:stackoverflow.com/a/11201224/3969362 Making a copy of the list is what they are typically doing with listeners on Android. It's a valid solution for small lists.
    – Slion
    Feb 8, 2021 at 16:47
2

A ListIterator allows you to add or remove items in the list. Suppose you have a list of Car objects:

List<Car> cars = ArrayList<>();
// add cars here...

for (ListIterator<Car> carIterator = cars.listIterator();  carIterator.hasNext(); )
{
   if (<some-condition>)
   { 
      carIterator().remove()
   }
   else if (<some-other-condition>)
   { 
      carIterator().add(aNewCar);
   }
}
1
  • The additional methods in the ListIterator interface (extension of Iterator) are interesting - particularly its previous method.
    – cellepo
    Dec 19, 2018 at 23:58
1

I know this question is too old to be about Java 8, but for those using Java 8 you can easily use removeIf():

Collection<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>();

for (int i=0; i < 10; ++i) {
    l.add(new Integer(4));
    l.add(new Integer(5));
    l.add(new Integer(6));
}

l.removeIf(i -> i.intValue() == 5);
0
1

Now, You can remove with the following code

l.removeIf(current -> current == 5);
1

Java Concurrent Modification Exception

  1. Single thread
Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
    String value = iter.next()
    if (value == "A") {
        list.remove(it.next()); //throws ConcurrentModificationException
    }
}

Solution: iterator remove() method

Iterator<String> iterator = list.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
    String value = iter.next()
    if (value == "A") {
        it.remove()
    }
}
  1. Multi thread
  • copy/convert and iterate over another one collection. For small collections
  • synchronize[About]
  • thread safe collection[About]
2
  • A condensed but more comprehensive answer.
    – RuneMage
    Feb 8 at 9:09
  • Your first example is not equivalent to your second, or to the OP's code.
    – user207421
    Apr 1 at 6:16
0

I have a suggestion for the problem above. No need of secondary list or any extra time. Please find an example which would do the same stuff but in a different way.

//"list" is ArrayList<Object>
//"state" is some boolean variable, which when set to true, Object will be removed from the list
int index = 0;
while(index < list.size()) {
    Object r = list.get(index);
    if( state ) {
        list.remove(index);
        index = 0;
        continue;
    }
    index += 1;
}

This would avoid the Concurrency Exception.

3
  • 2
    The question explicitly states, that the OP is not necessary using ArrayList and thus cannot rely on get(). Otherwise probably a good approach, though.
    – kaskelotti
    Apr 13, 2014 at 11:09
  • (Clarification ^) OP is using an arbitraryCollection - Collection interface does not include get. (Although FWIW List interface does include 'get').
    – cellepo
    Dec 19, 2018 at 22:31
  • I just added a separate, more detailed Answer here also for while-looping a List. But +1 for this Answer because it came first.
    – cellepo
    Dec 19, 2018 at 23:44
0
for (Integer i : l)
{
    if (i.intValue() == 5){
            itemsToRemove.add(i);
            break;
    }
}

The catch is the after removing the element from the list if you skip the internal iterator.next() call. it still works! Though I dont propose to write code like this it helps to understand the concept behind it :-)

Cheers!

0

Example of thread safe collection modification:

public class Example {
    private final List<String> queue = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>());

    public void removeFromQueue() {
        synchronized (queue) {
            Iterator<String> iterator = queue.iterator();
            String string = iterator.next();
            if (string.isEmpty()) {
                iterator.remove();
            }
        }
    }
}
0

One solution could be to rotate the list and remove the first element to avoid the ConcurrentModificationException or IndexOutOfBoundsException

int n = list.size();
for(int j=0;j<n;j++){
    //you can also put a condition before remove
    list.remove(0);
    Collections.rotate(list, 1);
}
Collections.rotate(list, -1);
0

Try this one (removes all elements in the list that equal i):

for (Object i : l) {
    if (condition(i)) {
        l = (l.stream().filter((a) -> a != i)).collect(Collectors.toList());
    }
}
0

You can use a while loop.

Iterator<Map.Entry<String, String>> iterator = map.entrySet().iterator();
while(iterator.hasNext()){
    Map.Entry<String, String> entry = iterator.next();
    if(entry.getKey().equals("test")) {
        iterator.remove();
    } 
}
1
  • The point here is not the while loop but removing via the Iterator.
    – user207421
    Apr 1 at 6:18
0

I ended up with this ConcurrentModificationException, while iterating the list using stream().map() method. However the for(:) did not throw the exception while iterating and modifying the the list.

Here is code snippet , if its of help to anyone: here I'm iterating on a ArrayList<BuildEntity> , and modifying it using the list.remove(obj)

 for(BuildEntity build : uniqueBuildEntities){
            if(build!=null){
                if(isBuildCrashedWithErrors(build)){
                    log.info("The following build crashed with errors ,  will not be persisted -> \n{}"
                            ,build.getBuildUrl());
                    uniqueBuildEntities.remove(build);
                    if (uniqueBuildEntities.isEmpty()) return  EMPTY_LIST;
                }
            }
        }
        if(uniqueBuildEntities.size()>0) {
            dbEntries.addAll(uniqueBuildEntities);
        }
0

If using HashMap, in newer versions of Java (8+) you can select each of 3 options:

public class UserProfileEntity {
    private String Code;
    private String mobileNumber;
    private LocalDateTime inputDT;
    // getters and setters here
}
HashMap<String, UserProfileEntity> upMap = new HashMap<>();


// remove by value
upMap.values().removeIf(value -> !value.getCode().contains("0005"));

// remove by key
upMap.keySet().removeIf(key -> key.contentEquals("testUser"));

// remove by entry / key + value
upMap.entrySet().removeIf(entry -> (entry.getKey().endsWith("admin") || entry.getValue().getInputDT().isBefore(LocalDateTime.now().minusMinutes(3)));
0

The best way (recommended) is use of java.util.concurrent package. By using this package you can easily avoid this exception. Refer Modified Code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Collection<Integer> l = new CopyOnWriteArrayList<Integer>();
    
    for (int i=0; i < 10; ++i) {
        l.add(new Integer(4));
        l.add(new Integer(5));
        l.add(new Integer(6));
    }
    
    for (Integer i : l) {
        if (i.intValue() == 5) {
            l.remove(i);
        }
    }
    
    System.out.println(l);
}
2
  • Did you take into account the performance hit? Each time you "write" to this structure, it's contents will be copied to a new object. All this is bad for performance.
    – Shankha057
    Jul 29, 2020 at 12:16
  • It isn't the best way and it isn't recommended. Don't use quote formatting for text that isn't quoted. If it is quoted, provide a citation.
    – user207421
    Apr 1 at 6:18
-1

In case ArrayList:remove(int index)- if(index is last element's position) it avoids without System.arraycopy() and takes not time for this.

arraycopy time increases if(index decreases), by the way elements of list also decreases!

the best effective remove way is- removing its elements in descending order: while(list.size()>0)list.remove(list.size()-1);//takes O(1) while(list.size()>0)list.remove(0);//takes O(factorial(n))

//region prepare data
ArrayList<Integer> ints = new ArrayList<Integer>();
ArrayList<Integer> toRemove = new ArrayList<Integer>();
Random rdm = new Random();
long millis;
for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
    Integer integer = rdm.nextInt();
    ints.add(integer);
}
ArrayList<Integer> intsForIndex = new ArrayList<Integer>(ints);
ArrayList<Integer> intsDescIndex = new ArrayList<Integer>(ints);
ArrayList<Integer> intsIterator = new ArrayList<Integer>(ints);
//endregion

// region for index
millis = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (int i = 0; i < intsForIndex.size(); i++) 
   if (intsForIndex.get(i) % 2 == 0) intsForIndex.remove(i--);
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - millis);
// endregion

// region for index desc
millis = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (int i = intsDescIndex.size() - 1; i >= 0; i--) 
   if (intsDescIndex.get(i) % 2 == 0) intsDescIndex.remove(i);
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - millis);
//endregion

// region iterator
millis = System.currentTimeMillis();
for (Iterator<Integer> iterator = intsIterator.iterator(); iterator.hasNext(); )
    if (iterator.next() % 2 == 0) iterator.remove();
System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - millis);
//endregion
  • for index loop: 1090 msec
  • for desc index: 519 msec---the best
  • for iterator: 1043 msec
-1

I know this question assumes just a Collection, and not more specifically any List. But for those reading this question who are indeed working with a List reference, you can avoid ConcurrentModificationException with a while-loop (while modifying within it) instead if you want to avoid Iterator (either if you want to avoid it in general, or avoid it specifically to achieve a looping order different from start-to-end stopping at each element [which I believe is the only order Iterator itself can do]):

*Update: See comments below that clarify the analogous is also achievable with the traditional-for-loop.

final List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();
for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i){
    list.add(i);
}

int i = 1;
while(i < list.size()){
    if(list.get(i) % 2 == 0){
        list.remove(i++);

    } else {
        i += 2;
    }
}

No ConcurrentModificationException from that code.

There we see looping not start at the beginning, and not stop at every element (which I believe Iterator itself can't do).

FWIW we also see get being called on list, which could not be done if its reference was just Collection (instead of the more specific List-type of Collection) - List interface includes get, but Collection interface does not. If not for that difference, then the list reference could instead be a Collection [and therefore technically this Answer would then be a direct Answer, instead of a tangential Answer].

FWIWW same code still works after modified to start at beginning at stop at every element (just like Iterator order):

final List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();
for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i){
    list.add(i);
}

int i = 0;
while(i < list.size()){
    if(list.get(i) % 2 == 0){
        list.remove(i);

    } else {
        ++i;
    }
}
3
  • This still requires very careful calculation of indicies to remove, however. Dec 19, 2018 at 23:56
  • Also, this is just a more detailed explanation of this answer stackoverflow.com/a/43441822/2308683 Dec 19, 2018 at 23:57
  • Good to know - thanks! That other Answer helped me understand that it's the enhanced-for-loop that would throw ConcurrentModificationException, but not the traditional-for-loop (which the other Answer uses) - not realizing that before is why I was motivated to write this Answer (I erroneously thought then that it was all for-loops that would throw the Exception).
    – cellepo
    Dec 20, 2018 at 0:29
-1

you can also use Recursion

Recursion in java is a process in which a method calls itself continuously. A method in java that calls itself is called recursive method.

-2

this might not be the best way, but for most of the small cases this should acceptable:

"create a second empty-array and add only the ones you want to keep"

I don't remeber where I read this from... for justiness I will make this wiki in hope someone finds it or just to don't earn rep I don't deserve.

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