14

I am trying to make one circle inside of another circle using css, but I am having an issue making it completely centered. I am close, but still not there. Any ideas?

<div id="content">
    <h1>Test Circle</h1>
    <div id="outer-circle">
        <div id="inner-circle">
            <span id="inside-content"></span>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

Here is my CSS:

#outer-circle {
    background: #385a94;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:500px;
    width:500px;
}
#inner-circle {
    position: relative;
    background: #a9aaab;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:300px;
    width:300px;
    margin: 0px 0px 0px 100px;
}

Also, here is a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/972SF/

  • remove the margin, add left: 100px; top: 100px;. – putvande Mar 14 '14 at 13:42
  • Might need to play with z-index also, to ensure the inner circle sits on top :) – user5623896726 Mar 14 '14 at 13:43
  • @user5623896726 no need for z-index. – putvande Mar 14 '14 at 13:46
  • True, no need when the elements are nested! – user5623896726 Mar 14 '14 at 13:47

12 Answers 12

25

Ta da!

Explained in the CSS comments:

 #outer-circle {
   background: #385a94;
   border-radius: 50%;
   height: 500px;
   width: 500px;
   position: relative;
   /* 
    Child elements with absolute positioning will be 
    positioned relative to this div 
   */
 }
 #inner-circle {
   position: absolute;
   background: #a9aaab;
   border-radius: 50%;
   height: 300px;
   width: 300px;
   /*
    Put top edge and left edge in the center
   */
   top: 50%;
   left: 50%;
   margin: -150px 0px 0px -150px;
   /* 
    Offset the position correctly with
    minus half of the width and minus half of the height 
   */
 }
<div id="outer-circle">
  <div id="inner-circle">

  </div>
</div>

  • It's like magic! haha. Thank you. I will be marking you as the answer as soon as SO lets me! – scapegoat17 Mar 14 '14 at 13:45
18

You don't need extra elements in CSS3

You can do it all with one element and a box-shadow.

JSFiddle Demo.

CSS

#outer-circle {
    background: #385a94;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:300px;
    width:300px;
    position: relative;
    box-shadow: 0 0 0 100px black;
    margin:100px;
}
  • 1
    My thoughts exactly +1. – agconti Mar 14 '14 at 13:52
  • this answer is super spicy. Thanks! – Sgnl Jul 6 '17 at 2:15
3

Use position: relative on the outer circle, position:absolute on the inner circle, and set all offset to the same value. Let the automatic calculation of height and width handle the rest (JSFiddle):

#outer-circle {
    position:relative;
    background: #385a94;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:500px;
    width:500px;
}
#inner-circle { 
    position:absolute;
    background: #a9aaab;
    border-radius: 50%;
    right: 100px;
    left: 100px;
    top: 100px;
    bottom: 100px;
    /* no margin, no width, they get automatically calculated*/
}
2

Seems that top is the only thing you need to alter -> http://jsfiddle.net/972SF/12/

#inner-circle {
    position: relative;
    background: #a9aaab;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:300px;
    width:300px;
    top: 100px; /* <--- */
    margin: 0px 0px 0px 100px;
}
2

Just use box-shadow to get the effect you want:

Demo in a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/972SF/16/

The html is reduced to:

<div id="content">
    <h1>Test Circle</h1>
    <div id="circle">
    </div>
</div>

Css:

#circle {
    margin: 10em auto;
    background: #385a94;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:200px;
    width:200px;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 1px 1px 0px 100px black;
       -moz-box-shadow: 1px 1px 0px 100px black;
            box-shadow: 1px 1px 0px 100px black;
}

its simple, easy, and makes sure that your circles are always perfectly positioned next to each other.

You can change the size of the circle by changing the 4th property ( 100px ) on box-shadow to what ever you want.

1

take a look at this fiddle

which calculates centering automatically

#outer-circle {
    background: #385a94;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:500px;
    width:500px;
    display:table-cell;
    vertical-align:middle;
}
#inner-circle {
    display:inline-block;
    background: #a9aaab;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:300px;
    width:300px;
}
1

Here is an example of a circle with outer border.

HTML:

<div id="inner-circle"></div>

Styles:

    #inner-circle {
    background: #385a94;
    border : 2px solid white;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:30px;
    width:30px;
    position: relative;
    box-shadow: 0 0 0 1px #cfd1d1;
    }

See results: JSFiddle

1

Solved this by using CSS transform property:

You can refer to this JS fiddle link for below output: http://jsfiddle.net/suprabhasupi/74b1ptne/ Circle inside circle

div {
  border-radius: 50%;
  /* border: 1px solid red; */
}

.circle1 {
  position: relative;
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  background-color: red;
}

.circle2 {
  transform: translate(25%, 25%);
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: green;
}

.circle3 {
   transform: translate(48%, 46%);
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: blue;
}
<div class="circle1">
  <div class="circle2">
    <div class="circle3">
    
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

  • I edited your answer to include the code that was previously only available on your jsFiddle. In the future, please include the relevant code in your answers so that the answer is still useful in the event that a 3rd party website is removed or otherwise unavailable. Please also try to avoid posting duplicate answers or answers that are very similar, as I see you have deleted one that looks the same. – Alex W Oct 23 '18 at 16:29
0

Try,

 #inner-circle {
    position: absolute;
    background: #a9aaab;
    border-radius: 50%;
    height:300px;
    width:300px;
    margin: 15% 0px 0px 100px;
}

Here is ur Updated JSFIDDLE

0

See How I have positioned the Divs, Just border-radius should do the Job

.outer{width:500px;height:500px;background:#f00;border-radius:50%;position:relative;top:0;left:100;}
.inner{width:250px;height:250px;background:#000;border-radius:50%;position:absolute;top:125;left:125;}



   <div class="outer">

      <div class="inner">


      </div>

    </div>

DEMO

0

try to give the innercircle a top:50% and than margin-top: a nagative value from the half of the height of the innercircle.

http://jsfiddle.net/972SF/19/

0

SOLVED! Exactly the way you want:

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/aniruddha153/RLWua/

HTML:

<div id="content">
   <div id="outer-circle">
      <div id="inner-circle">
      </div>
   </div>
</div>

CSS:

#content {
   position: relative;
   width: 100%;
   padding-bottom: 100%;
}

#outer-circle {
   position: absolute;
   width: 50%;
   height: 50%;
   background-color: #000000;
   border-radius: 50%;
}

#inner-circle{
  margin-top: 25%;
  margin-left: 25%;
  position: absolute;
  width: 50%;
  height: 50%;
  background-color: #e5e5e5;
  border-radius: 50%;
}
  • @scapegoat17 Try the above solution. – Aniruddha Pondhe Mar 14 '14 at 14:15

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