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I'm writing a Perl script that requires me to pull out a whole column from a file and manipulate it. For example take out column A and compare it to another column in another file

A B C

A B C

A B C

So far I have:

sub routine1
{
    ( $_ = <FILE> )

    {
        next if $. < 2; # to skip header of file

        my @array1 = split(/\t/, $_);
        my $file1 = $array1[@_];

        return $file1;
    }
}

I have most of it done. The only problem is that when I call to print the subroutine it only prints the first element in the array (i.e. it will only print one A).

  • 1
    The code you posted doesn't compile. Are you sure you don't have something more like while ($_ = <FILE>) { ... } ? – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Mar 14 '14 at 20:26
  • That's odd. It compiles for me. No, I don't have something like that. The code above is exactly how I have it. – RookieOfTheYear Mar 14 '14 at 20:28
  • What version of Perl do you have? – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Mar 14 '14 at 20:33
  • I'm currently on perl v.5.16.3. When i type in "print routine1(1)" only one A prints out instead of the whole column – RookieOfTheYear Mar 14 '14 at 20:36
  • I'm guessing you have a semi-colon after ( $_ = <FILE> ), since even in Perl 5.16.3 I get syntax error at foo line 10, near ") {" – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Mar 14 '14 at 21:04
1

I am sure that what you actually have is this

sub routine1
{
    while ( $_ = <FILE> )

    {
        next if $. < 2; # to skip header of file

        my @array1 = split(/\t/, $_);
        my $file1 = $array1[@_];

        return $file1;
    }
}

which does compile, and reads the file one line at a time in a loop.

There are two problems here. First of all, as soon as your loop has read the first line of the file (after the header) the return statement exits the subroutine, returning the only field it has read. That is why you get only a single value.

Secondly, you have indexed your @array1 with @_. What that does is take the number of elements in @_ (usually one) and use that to index @array1. You will therefore always get the second element of the array.

I'm not clear what you expect as a result, but you should write something like this. It accumulates all the values from the specified column into the array @retval, and passes the file handle into the subroutine instead of just using a global, which is poor programming practice.

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $fh, '<', 'myfile.txt' or die $!;
my @column2 = routine1($fh, 1);
print "@column2\n";

sub routine1 {

  my ($fh, $index) = @_;
  my @retval;

  while ($_ = <$fh>) {
    next if $. < 2;    # to skip header of file
    my @fields = split /\t/;
    my $field  = $fields[$index];
    push @retval, $field;
  }

  return @retval;
}

output

B B
0

Try replacing most of your sub with something like this:

 my @aColumn = ();
 while (<FILE>) 
 {
    chomp;
    ($Acol, $Bcol, $Ccol) = split("\t");
    push(@aColumn, $Acol);
  }
  return @aColumn
0

Jumping to the end, the following will pull out the first column in your file blah.txt and put it in an array for you to manipulate later:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my $file = 'blah.txt';

open my $fh, '<', $file;

my @firstcol;

while (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    my @cols = split;
    push @firstcol, $cols[0];
}

use Data::Dump;
dd \@firstcol;

What you have right now isn't actually looping on the contents of the file, so you aren't going to be building an array.

  • 1
    No need to chomp when using split w/o explicit parameters, as it'll remove the trailing newlines. – Kenosis Mar 16 '14 at 5:54
  • 1
    TY @Kenosis, I didn't know that. I'd still probably choose to write an explicit chomp in anything but a perl one-liner as I can see introducing a bug later on very easily. And I'd definitely use it when trying to teach a new person how to code, like in this example. Nevertheless, appreciate the tip. – Miller Mar 16 '14 at 6:00
  • You're most welcome. You make a very good point about using chomp explicitly when working with a person new to Perl. – Kenosis Mar 16 '14 at 6:06
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Here's are a few items for you to consider when crafting a subroutine solution for obtaining an array of column values from a file:

  • Skip the file header before entering the while loop to avoid a line-number comparison for each file line.
  • split only the number of columns you need by using split's LIMIT. This can significantly speed up the process.
  • Optionally, initialize a local copy of Perl's @ARGV with the file name, and let Perl handle the file i/o.

Borodin's solution to create a subroutine that takes both the file name column number is excellent, so it's implemented below, too:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @colVals = getFileCol( 'File.txt', 0 );
print "@colVals\n";

sub getFileCol {
    local @ARGV = (shift);
    my ( $col, @arr ) = shift;

    <>;    # skip file header
    while (<>) {
        my $val = ( split ' ', $_, $col + 2 )[$col] or next;
        push @arr, $val;
    }

    return @arr;
}

Output on your dataset:

A A

Hope this helps!

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