41

When you use async module, how can you then pass arguments from the previous callback to the next?

Here is an example from the docs on github

async.series({
    one: function(callback){
        setTimeout(function(){
            callback(null, 1);
        }, 200);
    },
    two: function(callback){
        setTimeout(function(){
            callback(null, 2);
        }, 100);
    }
},
function(err, results) {
    // results is now equal to: {one: 1, two: 2}
});
  • 8
    If you want to pass data to the next callback, you're probably looking for the async.waterfall method, and not async.series – adeneo Mar 15 '14 at 13:50
85

You can chain together asynchronous functions with the async module's waterfall function. This allows you to say, "first do x, then pass the results to function y, and pass the results of that to z." Copied from the [docs][1]:

async.waterfall([
    function(callback){
        callback(null, 'one', 'two');
    },
    function(arg1, arg2, callback){
        // arg1 now equals 'one' and arg2 now equals 'two'
        callback(null, 'three');
    },
    function(arg1, callback){
        // arg1 now equals 'three'
        callback(null, 'done');
    }
], function (err, result) {
   // result now equals 'done'    
});

You don't strictly need the async module to accomplish this; this function is designed to make the code easier to read. If you don't want to use the async module, you can always just use traditional callbacks.

  • 2
    Why the first parameter of callback is always null ? – Zen Nov 13 '15 at 14:00
  • 6
    @Zen The first parameter is reserved for error callbacks if you want to add them. – AlexMA Nov 13 '15 at 14:02
  • if results are successfull then callback(null, 'done');. if you want to break the flow for special case then callback("ERROR", error_text); – Saurabh Lende Aug 10 '17 at 12:52
16

Another option is to use async.auto. With async auto you can specify the dependency data for a task and async will begin to run it when able to. There is a good example in the README.md, but here is roughly your series from above:

async.auto({
    one: function(callback){
        setTimeout(function(){
            callback(null, 1);
        }, 200);
    }, 
    // If two does not depend on one, then you can remove the 'one' string
    //   from the array and they will run asynchronously (good for "parallel" IO tasks)
    two: ['one', function(callback, results){
        setTimeout(function(){
            callback(null, 2);
        }, 100);
    }],
    // Final depends on both 'one' and 'two' being completed and their results
    final: ['one', 'two',function(err, results) {
    // results is now equal to: {one: 1, two: 2}
    }];
});
9

I spent quite a bit of time solving this issue because I encountered similar situation. I tried both async.series and async.waterfall.

async.series: Used a variable to share across the callback functions. I am not sure whether this is the best way to do it. I must give credit to Sebastian for his wonderful article about async.

var async1 = require('async');

exports.asyncSeries1 = function (req, res, callback) {

    var sharedData = "Data from : ";
    async1.series([
            // First function
            function(callback) {
                sharedData = "First Callback";
                callback();
            },
            // Second function
            function(callback){
                console.log(sharedData);
                sharedData = "Second Callback";
                callback();
            }
        ],
        // Final callback 
        function(err) {
            console.log(sharedData);
            if (err) {
                callback();
            }
            callback();
        }
    );
};

async.waterfall: I tried using another callback function using async.apply. Here is the piece of code that helped me solve the problem. `

var async2 = require('async')

exports.asyncWaterfall1 = function (arg1, arg2, cb) {
    async2.waterfall([
        // async.apply
        async2.apply(assignVariables, arg1, arg2),
        // First callback
        function(arg1, arg2, callback){
            console.log(arg1);
            console.log(arg2);
            arg1 = 5;
            arg2 = 6;
            callback(null, arg1, arg2);
        },
        // Second callback
        function(arg1, arg2, callback){
          // arg1 now equals 'one' and arg2 now equals 'two'
            console.log(arg1);
            console.log(arg2);
            arg1 = 7;
            arg2 = 8;
            callback(null, arg1, arg2);
        }
    ], 
    function (err, arg1, arg2) {
        console.log(arg1);
        console.log(arg2);  
    });
};

// Method to assign variables
function assignVariables(arg1, arg2, callback) {
    console.log(arg1);
    console.log(arg2);
    arg1 = 3;
    arg2 = 4;
    callback(null, arg1, arg2);
};

PS: Credit.

  • Both methods seems good. I have recently started using async. I just want to ask you that which is better or efficient method (for this case) async.series() or async.waterfall() – Saurabh Lende Aug 10 '17 at 13:01

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