This question already has an answer here:

Im working with the gm npm module that deals with image manipulation. and i have this code.

for(i=0;i < 4;i++){
    gm("www/img/" + image[i]).crop(550, 406, 0, 0).write(function(err) {
         console.log(this.outname + " created  ::  " + arguments[3]); //success
    });
}

this loop is meant to loop through the images array and crop each photo, but it only crops the last one. i think its something to do function invocation and callbacks, but not advanced yet for that level.

marked as duplicate by user1310070, Frank van Puffelen, Royi Namir, cpburnz, Fresheyeball Mar 16 '14 at 16:26

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change your code to:

for (var i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
  (function (i) {
    gm("www/img/" + image[i]).crop(550, 406, 0, 0).write(function(err) {
         console.log(this.outname + " created  ::  " + arguments[3]); //success
    });
  }).call(this, i);
}

otherwise the value of i will be 3 each time your callback is being invoked.

  • 1
    wont work. you need to lock the var – Royi Namir Mar 16 '14 at 14:18
  • Yes, it is fixed now. – Minko Gechev Mar 16 '14 at 14:19
  • +1 For maintaining the original context this inside the anonymous function which is missing in Royi's answer as of now – sachinjain024 Mar 16 '14 at 14:24
  • 1
    arguments should also be kept. youre overriding them via call. look at my sample – Royi Namir Mar 16 '14 at 14:34
  • how about if i want to pass two variables to the inner function(closure) so for example i and b – Unknown Mar 16 '14 at 14:44

You need to create a "closure" over the variable

Js has a function scope.

for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
{
    (function (a)
    {
        gm("www/img/" + image[a]).crop(550, 406, 0, 0).write(function (err)
        {
            console.log(this.outname + " created  ::  " + arguments[3]); //success
        });
    }).call(this,i)
}

or

that=this;

for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        (function (a)
        {
            gm("www/img/" + image[a]).crop(550, 406, 0, 0).write(function (err)
            {
                console.log(that.outname + " created  ::  " + arguments[3]); //success
            });
        })(i)
    }

edit :

Also - I would also keep a reference to the arguments since now , after IIFE - the arguments is changing.

you can keep your arguments via :

var args= Array.prototype.slice.apply(arguments)

example :

function g()

{
for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        (function (a)
        {
           console.log(arguments); //huh ? arguments are not a,b,c !!! anymore
        })(i);
    }
}


g('a','b','c') // 0,1,2,3

so you do need to keep reference to the arguments cuz their changed after IIFE.

  • +1 Nice answer..Every JS beginner definitely comes across similar problem. I did too few days back :) – sachinjain024 Mar 16 '14 at 14:20
  • @blunderboy tnx - most important is to understand that JS has function scope. and that closure is merely a scope where inner function has access to it's parent scope' . – Royi Namir Mar 16 '14 at 14:21
  • Exactly and you made the answer to the point. – sachinjain024 Mar 16 '14 at 14:22
  • One thing you have missed is the context of this in the anonymous function. You should use var that = this and use that inside the function or just use call or may be use bind method. – sachinjain024 Mar 16 '14 at 14:23
  • @blunderboy this in IIFE is the global window. if you want to keep the outer IIFE scope for future using this then - than is the right way. – Royi Namir Mar 16 '14 at 14:24

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