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What is the difference between the functions seq? sequential? and coll?

I found some information scattered throughout the internet, but I think it would be better to centralize that information here.

27

seq? is a predicate that returns true if it's argument implements ISeq interface, which is to say it provides the methods first,rest,cons. See http://clojure.org/sequences.

(seq? [1 2])
false
(seq? (seq [1 2]))
true

sequential? is a predicate that returns true if it's argument implements Sequential interface. Sequential is a marker interface (no methods) and is a promise that the collection can be iterated over in a defined order (e.g. a list, but not a map).

(sequential? [])
true
(sequential? {})
false

coll? is a predicate that returns true if its argument implments IPersistentCollection. So for example the clojure data structures would return true, whereas native java data structures would not:

(coll? {:a 1})
true
(coll? (java.util.HashMap.))
false
  • 3
    Vectors provide first, rest, and cons, yet they aren't seq?? – FeifanZ Feb 19 '16 at 20:23
  • 2
    @FeifanZ, these(first,rest,cons) functions first call seq function for its argument. So if you use these functions for vector (clojure.lang.PersistentVector) which doesn't implement ISeq interface (seq? function return false), it means that you use these function for vector (clojure.lang.PersistentVector$ChunkedSeq) which implements ISeq interface(seq? return true). – snufkon Apr 1 '16 at 23:46
9
  • seq? is true for any sequence.
  • sequential? is true for any sequential (not associative) collection.
  • coll? is true for any Clojure collection.

seq? implies sequential? implies coll?

=> ((juxt seq? sequential? coll?) ()) ; [true true true]
=> ((juxt seq? sequential? coll?) []) ; [false true true]
=> ((juxt seq? sequential? coll?) #{}); [false false true]

Inaccurate: sequential? is related to the others purely by convention - see Kevin's answer.

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