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I'm playing a game that has a weapon-forging component, where you combine two weapons to get a new one. The sheer number of weapon combinations (see "6.1. Blade Combination Tables" at http://www.gamefaqs.com/ps/914326-vagrant-story/faqs/8485) makes it difficult to figure out what you can ultimately create out of your current weapons through repeated forging, so I tried writing a program that would do this for me. I give it a list of weapons that I currently have, such as:

  • francisca
  • tabarzin
  • kris

and it gives me the list of all weapons that I can forge:

  • ball mace
  • chamkaq
  • dirk
  • francisca
  • large crescent
  • throwing knife

The problem is that I'm using a brute-force algorithm that scales extremely poorly; it takes about 15 seconds to calculate all possible weapons for seven starting weapons, and a few minutes to calculate for eight starting weapons. I'd like it to be able to calculate up to 64 weapons (the maximum that you can hold at once), but I don't think I'd live long enough to see the results.

function find_possible_weapons(source_weapons)
{
    for (i in source_weapons)
    {
        for (j in source_weapons)
        {
            if (i != j)
            {
                result_weapon = combine_weapons(source_weapons[i], source_weapons[j]);

                new_weapons = array();
                new_weapons.add(result_weapon);
                for (k in source_weapons)
                {
                    if (k != i && k != j)
                        new_weapons.add(source_weapons[k]);
                }
                find_possible_weapons(new_weapons);
            }
        }
    }
}

In English: I attempt every combination of two weapons from my list of source weapons. For each of those combinations, I create a new list of all weapons that I'd have following that combination (that is, the newly-combined weapon plus all of the source weapons except the two that I combined), and then I repeat these steps for the new list.

Is there a better way to do this?

Note that combining weapons in the reverse order can change the result (Rapier + Firangi = Short Sword, but Firangi + Rapier = Spatha), so I can't skip those reversals in the j loop.

Edit: Here's a breakdown of the test example that I gave above, to show what the algorithm is doing. A line in brackets shows the result of a combination, and the following line is the new list of weapons that's created as a result:

francisca,tabarzin,kris
[francisca + tabarzin = chamkaq]
    chamkaq,kris
    [chamkaq + kris = large crescent]
        large crescent
    [kris + chamkaq = large crescent]
        large crescent
[francisca + kris = dirk]
    dirk,tabarzin
    [dirk + tabarzin = francisca]
        francisca
    [tabarzin + dirk = francisca]
        francisca
[tabarzin + francisca = chamkaq]
    chamkaq,kris
    [chamkaq + kris = large crescent]
        large crescent
    [kris + chamkaq = large crescent]
        large crescent
[tabarzin + kris = throwing knife]
    throwing knife,francisca
    [throwing knife + francisca = ball mace]
        ball mace
    [francisca + throwing knife = ball mace]
        ball mace
[kris + francisca = dirk]
    dirk,tabarzin
    [dirk + tabarzin = francisca]
        francisca
    [tabarzin + dirk = francisca]
        francisca
[kris + tabarzin = throwing knife]
    throwing knife,francisca
    [throwing knife + francisca = ball mace]
        ball mace
    [francisca + throwing knife = ball mace]
        ball mace

Also, note that duplicate items in a list of weapons are significant and can't be removed. For example, if I add a second kris to my list of starting weapons so that I have the following list:

  • francisca
  • tabarzin
  • kris
  • kris

then I'm able to forge the following items:

  • ball mace
  • battle axe
  • battle knife
  • chamkaq
  • dirk
  • francisca
  • kris
  • kudi
  • large crescent
  • scramasax
  • throwing knife

The addition of a duplicate kris allowed me to forge four new items that I couldn't before. It also increased the total number of forge tests to 252 for a four-item list, up from 27 for the three-item list.

Edit: I'm getting the feeling that solving this would require more math and computer science knowledge than I have, so I'm going to give up on it. It seemed like a simple enough problem at first, but then, so does the Travelling Salesman. I'm accepting David Eisenstat's answer since the suggestion of remembering and skipping duplicate item lists made such a huge difference in execution time and seems like it would be applicable to a lot of similar problems.

5
  • Do the tables have any duplicate pairs in (e.g., kris+kris=wombat)? – Donal Fellows Mar 17 '14 at 9:26
  • It would be nice to include the forging table you use and a few explicit instances with runtimes of your version in a format that allows us to try our own approaches without having to extract everything from that link. – Listing Mar 17 '14 at 17:22
  • @Donal Fellows Yes, there are a few cases where an item, combined with itself, creates a different item. "pole axe + pole axe = Bardysh" is one. – Josh Townzen Mar 18 '14 at 0:28
  • 1
    @Listing Here are links to the list of all weapons (pastebin.com/dm29jVVU) and the list of all weapon combinations (pastebin.com/MLhJcKV9, in the format "[source1],[source2],[result]") – Josh Townzen Mar 18 '14 at 0:44
  • Just to nitpick, you cannot actually reduce the complexity of an algorithm, the complexity is a basic property of an algorithm. If you find yourself changing the code in such a way as to get better complexity, I think you'll find that's a different algorithm :-) – paxdiablo Oct 8 '15 at 12:44
11

Start by memoizing the brute force solution, i.e., sort source_weapons, make it hashable (e.g., convert to a string by joining with commas), and look it up in a map of input/output pairs. If it isn't there, do the computation as normal and add the result to the map. This often results in big wins for little effort.

Alternatively, you could do a backward search. Given a multiset of weapons, form predecessors by replacing one of the weapon with two weapons that forge it, in all possible ways. Starting with the singleton list consisting of the singleton multiset consisting of the goal weapon, repeatedly expand the list by predecessors of list elements and then cull multisets that are supersets of others. Stop when you reach a fixed point.


If linear programming is an option, then there are systematic ways to prune search trees. In particular, let's make the problem easier by (i) allowing an infinite supply of "catalysts" (maybe not needed here?) (ii) allowing "fractional" forging, e.g., if X + Y => Z, then 0.5 X + 0.5 Y => 0.5 Z. Then there's an LP formulation as follows. For all i + j => k (i and j forge k), the variable x_{ijk} is the number of times this forge is performed.

minimize sum_{i, j => k} x_{ijk} (to prevent wasteful cycles)
for all i:   sum_{j, k: j + k => i} x_{jki}
           - sum_{j, k: j + i => k} x_{jik}
           - sum_{j, k: i + j => k} x_{ijk} >= q_i,
for all i + j => k: x_{ijk} >= 0,

where q_i is 1 if i is the goal item, else minus the number of i initially available. There are efficient solvers for this easy version. Since the reactions are always 2 => 1, you can always recover a feasible forging schedule for an integer solution. Accordingly, I would recommend integer programming for this problem. The paragraph below may still be of interest.

I know shipping an LP solver may be inconvenient, so here's an insight that will let you do without. This LP is feasible if and only if its dual is bounded. Intuitively, the dual problem is to assign a "value" to each item such that, however you forge, the total value of your inventory does not increase. If the goal item is valued at more than the available inventory, then you can't forge it. You can use any method that you can think of to assign these values.

1
  • 7
    +1 for the suggestion to hash and store the sorted lists of weapons and skip processing of duplicate lists. That dropped the run time for an eight-item list from 3.5 minutes to less than a second, and also processed a 12-item list in 19 seconds and a 13-item list in 67 seconds. – Josh Townzen Mar 17 '14 at 0:41
8

I think you are unlikely to get a good general answer to this question because if there was an efficient algorithm to solve your problem, then it would also be able to solve NP-complete problems.

For example, consider the problem of finding the maximum number of independent rows in a binary matrix.
This is a known NP-complete problem (e.g. by showing equivalence to the maximum independent set problem).

We can reduce this problem to your question in the following manner:

We can start holding one weapon for each column in the binary matrix, and then we imagine each row describes an alternative way of making a new weapon (say a battle axe). We construct the weapon translation table such that to make the battle axe using method i, we need all weapons j such that M[i,j] is equal to 1 (this may involve inventing some additional weapons).

Then we construct a series of super weapons which can be made by combining different numbers of our battle axes.

For example, the mega ultimate battle axe may require 4 battle axes to be combined.

If we are able to work out the best weapon that can be constructed from your starting weapons, then we have solved the problem of finding the maximum number of independent rows in the original binary matrix.

2
  • 2
    We don't need a general answer though. Unless the game designers embedded a super-CAPTCHA into the crafting tables, it wouldn't surprise me at all to see an integer program solver taking on full inventories at interactive speeds. – David Eisenstat Mar 17 '14 at 3:07
  • @DavidEisenstat I agree. I posted this because I thought this was a really interesting question and there should be an efficient ~O(n^2logn) dynamic programming solution to this - but I was unable to work it out. I just wanted to prevent other people from falling into the same trap. +1 to you for solving it anyway! – Peter de Rivaz Mar 17 '14 at 9:12
4

It's not a huge saving, however looking at the source document, there are times when combining weapons produces the same weapon as one that was combined. I assume that you won't want to do this as you'll end up with less weapons.

So if you added a check for if the result_weapon was the same type as one of the inputs, and didn't go ahead and recursively call find_possible_weapons(new_weapons), you'd trim the search down a little.

The other thing I could think of, is you are not keeping a track of work done, so if the return from find_possible_weapons(new_weapons) returns the same weapon that you already have got by combining other weapons, you might well be performing the same search branch multiple times.

e.g. if you have a, b, c, d, e, f, g, and if a + b = x, and c + d = x, then you algorithm will be performing two lots of comparing x against e, f, and g. So if you keep a track of what you've already computed, you'll be onto a winner...

Basically, you have to trim the search tree. There are loads of different techniques to do this: it's called search. If you want more advice, I'd recommend going to the computer science stack exchange.

If you are still struggling, then you could always start weighting items/resulting items, and only focus on doing the calculation on 'high gain' objects...

3
  • The reason that I'm not ignoring cases where a combination creates one of the two source weapons is that there are also weapon materials that I'd planned to take into account eventually. For example, a bronze scimitar + an iron scimitar would give a hagane scimitar. I may want to give up on that, though, and just worry about weapon types. – Josh Townzen Mar 16 '14 at 21:22
  • 1
    +1 I did end up testing this (skipping combinations where the result weapon was identical to one of the source ones) and it made a larger difference than I expected. It dropped the execution time of an eight-item list from around 4 minutes to just 44 seconds. This also worked well alongside David Eisenstat's suggestion of skipping duplicate source lists. Just skipping duplicate source lists gave an execution time of 43 seconds for a specific 12-item list; when I also skipped dead-end combinations, that dropped the execution time to 31 seconds for the same list. – Josh Townzen Mar 18 '14 at 1:43
  • @JoshTownzen Thanks for letting me know - it's nice to know an answer is helpful. – stormCloud Mar 22 '14 at 13:40
2

You might want to start by creating a Weapon[][] matrix, to show the results of forging each pair. You could map the name of the weapon to the index of the matrix axis, and lookup of the results of a weapon combination would occur in constant time.

7
  • I think you've missed a step. You could use this to enhance the algorithm, but it isn't the complete thing. The algorithm he's got is recursive as presumably a weapon you've made can be used to make another weapon... – stormCloud Mar 16 '14 at 20:25
  • Currently, I'm using a map<string, map<string, string>> to look up the result of forging two weapons. I plan to instead give each weapon an index number, then use a table to look up the results of each combination, but I don't think that will help it scale any better for large values of n. – Josh Townzen Mar 16 '14 at 20:25
  • Exactly how large is N? The number of possible weapon combos is only N^2 and it seems there's not a whole lot you can do about that. – La-comadreja Mar 16 '14 at 20:35
  • N can be up to 64 (the maximum number of weapons that you can hold at once), but the time complexity of my algorithm is worse than N^2; for each of the N^2 ways that I can forge a pair of the current set of weapons, I end up with a new set of weapons. I then have to recursively test that new set, which involves testing (N-1)^2 combinations, each of which generates a new set of weapons to test, and so on. I'm not sure exactly what the time complexity is, but I think it's N! or worse. – Josh Townzen Mar 16 '14 at 20:49
  • just save the forging results in a 64 x 64 matrix and store the weapons you've got as a list and it's going to be super fast. – La-comadreja Mar 16 '14 at 22:00

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