13

Let's say I have something like:

#define SIZE 32

/* ... */

unsigned x;

/* ... */

x %= SIZE;

Would the x % 32 generally be reduced to x & 31 by most C/C++ compilers such as GCC?

  • @JonathonReinhart Whoops, I meant x % 32 and x & 31. – Matt Mar 17 '14 at 3:32
21

Yes, any respectable compiler should perform this optimization. Specifically, a % X operation, where X is a constant power of two will become the equivalent of an & (X-1) operation.

GCC will even do this with optimizations turned off:

Example (gcc -c -O0 version 3.4.4 on Cygwin):

unsigned int test(unsigned int a) {
   return a % 32;
}

Result (objdump -d):

00000000 <_test>:
   0:   55                      push   %ebp
   1:   89 e5                   mov    %esp,%ebp
   3:   8b 45 08                mov    0x8(%ebp),%eax
   6:   5d                      pop    %ebp
   7:   83 e0 1f                and    $0x1f,%eax          ;; Here
   a:   c3                      ret
  • Would it do that without optimizations enabled just like it reduces (5 + 5) to 10? – Matt Mar 17 '14 at 3:38
  • 4
    @Matt Updated. Yes, GCC does. Also, showing you these commands should empower you to try any ideas like this out yourself. – Jonathon Reinhart Mar 17 '14 at 3:40
  • 1
    Trying it myself will only tell me about my particular implementation. – Matt Mar 17 '14 at 3:44
  • 3
    Common misconception here ... -O0 doesn’t disable optimizations in GCC. The GCC documentation says that -O0 will reduce compilation time and make debugging produce the expected results. For example, on GCC Debian 6.3.0, gcc -O0 -Q --help=optimizers | grep enabled | wc -l suggests that 53 optimizations remain enabled. – Matthew Cole Nov 1 '17 at 14:58

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