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I'm doing the exercises in Learn Python the Hard Way! and I give them names like exercise1.py, excercise2.py and they go up to 50. I'm using Sublime Text and Cygwin on Windows.

Conceptually the computer can do lots of repetitive things really fast. Is there a way make a thing that would create a bunch of files like excercise1.py up to 50 and or open all of them up so I don't have to waste time in between the exercises manually creating and opening blank pages?

Sorry I'm kind of overwhelmed and don't have the necessary lexicon to describe what I want to do briefly/ in technical terms.

3 Answers 3

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Think about how you'd normally open a file:

file = open('exercise.py', 'w')
# do stuff to file, or just nothing
file.close()

Now we want to do this 50 times:

for i in range(50):
    file = open('exercise.py', 'w')
    file.close()

But each time we should replace 'exercise.py' with a different string. Namely, 'exercise1.py', 'exercise2.py', etc.

for i in range(50):
    filename = # some expression involving i
    file = open(filename, 'w')
    file.close()

Can you think of what should come after filename =? A basic answer could involve the + operator for concatenating strings (ie, gluing them together back-to-back), and the str function that can turn a number to a string. A slightly more sophisticated answer might involve the % operator for string formatting or the str.format method

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  • Thanks for walking me through the thinking process! Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 15:18
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This will quickly solve your problem

for each in range(1,51):
    f = open("exercise"+str(each)+".py","w")
    f.close()
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  • 1
    You could also use "exercise%d.py" % each or "exercise{}.py".format(each) instead of "exercise"+str(each)+".py"
    – alecbz
    Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 6:24
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You're using Cygwin so why not just use bash?

for i in {1..50}
do
  touch "exercise$i.py"
done
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  • You can style a block of code by indenting it by 4 spaces (or just highlighting it and hitting the "code block" button).
    – alecbz
    Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 6:22
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    Knowing when you should write an application vs when you should drop a 1 line bash script is an essential part of being a good engineer. Nicely done. Also: seq 1 50 | xargs -I{} bash -c 'touch exercise{}.py' Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 8:01
  • What's a good rule of thumb for knowing when? What about 2 lines? Commented Mar 17, 2014 at 15:19

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