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I'm trying to understand the benefits of using abstract base classes. Consider these two pieces of code:

Abstract base class:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod, abstractproperty

class CanFly:
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    @abstractmethod
    def fly(self):
        pass

    @abstractproperty
    def speed(self):
        pass


class Bird(CanFly):

    def __init__(self):
        self.name = 'flappy'

    @property
    def speed(self):
        return 1

    def fly(self):
        print('fly')


b = Bird()

print(isinstance(b, CanFly))  # True
print(issubclass(Bird, CanFly))  #  True

Plain inheritance:

class CanFly(object):

    def fly(self):
        raise NotImplementedError

    @property
    def speed(self):
        raise NotImplementedError()


class Bird(CanFly):

    @property
    def speed(self):
        return 1

    def fly(self):
        print('fly')


b = Bird()

print(isinstance(b, CanFly))  # True
print(issubclass(Bird, CanFly))  # True

As you see, both methods support inflection using isinstance and issubclass.

Now, one difference I know is that, if you try to instantiate a subclass of an abstract base class without overriding all abstract methods/properties, your program will fail loudly. However, if you use plain inheritance with NotImplementedError, your code won't fail until you actually invoke the method/property in question.

Other than that, what makes using abstract base class different?

  • possible duplicate of Why use Abstract Base Classes in Python? – Jayanth Koushik Mar 17 '14 at 8:01
  • 1
    @JayanthKoushik I don't think this question is a duplicate of that question, because this is asking about abstract base classes vs. plain inheritance, while the other question is asking about abstract base classes vs. duck typing. – DataMan Mar 15 '18 at 13:19

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